The September Garden

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It’s such an exciting month in the garden, as it is just waking up from its long Winter sleep. Every day, I look for new discoveries – fresh leaf, new blossom and the emergence of long-lost bulbs and perennials, which have disappeared over Winter. By the end of the month, the garden is positively exploding with fresh colour!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-10-27-36blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-40-24blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-13-19blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-13-14-39We have been fortunate to get good rain to start the growing season , the frosts have almost finished and the sunny days are getting longer and longer.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-08-49-57blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-09-35-29 The crab apple is in full bloom and beat the white prunus this year, though the latter quickly caught up and now dominates the garden by its sheer size!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-39-35blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-38-10 We were really thrilled to see the bluebells in bud under the crab apple !blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-11-02-25blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-11-02-48 The white mulberry and the maples have new leaf and buds forming, as have a number of the shrubs like the new pink weigela and spireae and viburnum, the latter two now opening up.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-13-15-21blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-12-12-11-13blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-36-43The garden is experiencing the changing of the guard from the final blooms of Winter honeysuckle and daphne to the yellow banksia rose and white maybush;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-23-23blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-23-35The violets to the new maple leaf and bulbs of the treasure garden in early September,blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-02-18-38-02blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-19-00-04blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-15-21-56 the latter in turn to be supplanted by the cutting garden as the month progressed;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-11-05-26 The pink violets to the red grevillea, Lady X;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-14-11-36-09 The japonicas, camellias and hellebores to the exochorda, lilacs, red rhododendron and roses; blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-50-13blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-35-46blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-33-13 blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-16-28-01The deep red hellebore finally got its act together with a late show of flowers.blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1147The roses have been shooting new leaves proliferously and the early roses are in bud: Chateau de Clos Vougeot (photo below) is the most advanced this year; the Banksia rose and Fortuneana are set to explode and we have new buds on Viridiflora and Countess Bertha,  Alister Stella Gray,  Stanwell Perpetual and Mutabilis,  Adam and the new Souvenir de la Malmaison.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-17-22-03Along the back path, the lilies are shooting madly, the acanthus has new flower spikes and the Italian lavender and daisies are in full bloom.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-10-32blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-15-16-51-28blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-12-41-11The sunny heads of the calendula complement the bright golden laburnum nearby.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-10-53blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-08-48-49The Peony has finally surfaced, as have the Snakes’ Head Fritillaries, whose pendant buds have such a distinctive chequerboard pattern. Here is the bud opening over the week.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-24-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-23-18-28-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-09-54-55A sole blossom on Narcissus panizzianus (1st photo below) has joined the clivea buds, which have opened into clear orange bells.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-00-56blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-10-30-52 The Cutting Garden is gaining more and more colour every day.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-13-14blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-46-36 blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-18-00-06We started the season with Bokassa Gold and Clusiana species tulips, which are now guarded by wire cages, since their first bloom (photo 2) was decapitated by the bower birds!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-13-32-44blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-13-02-15blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-09-17-39-14blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-13-30-16 The tulips are now in full steam. In order, two photos of each : Lily Tulips Claudia and Synaeda Orange; Destiny Parrot Tulip; Bokassa Red and Verandi; and pale pink Monet Tulips.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-12-11-42-43blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-24-33blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-45-55blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-09-13-55-35blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-54blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-04blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-30blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-11-52blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-46-27blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-11-32blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-12-46-49blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-13-47 In the daffodil row, Golden Dawn and Winter Sun have been joined by the delicate Actaea and luscious Acropolis.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-16-14-30blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-16-14-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-44-11blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-10-59-57 The divinely-scented freesias have finally opened, as well as a few blue  cornflower blooms and  a golden Iceberg Poppy from last year.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-23-18-31-29blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-32-54blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-14-11-24-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-34-43 And our first ranunculus is in bloom!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-12-47-51We labelled all the daffodil and tulip bulbs, so that when their foliage dies, I can transplant them to new areas around the garden.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-11-05-26In the Soho Bed, the loyal Wallflowers are now joined by pink verbena blooms, Italian Lavender, pink thrift and recovering catmint , as well as masses of sweet little forget-me-knots. We have even had our first wild poppy!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-10-27-55blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-25-34blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-13-13-58blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-10-56-33blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-41-23blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-10-38-23 We still need to thin out the peony poppies, which self-seeded from last year’s crop, but we have done the deed in the hand-sown bed, so it is looking much more ordered!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-18-17-18 Ross made a separate strawberry bed behind the peony poppies. blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-18-17-24 We weeded the Moon Bed.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-07-11-06-53 Ross has also done lots of work in the vegetable garden, including making protective wire guards. He has also potted new cuttings and planted out the rose cuttings, which were struck last year.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-09-36-14I too have been busy! In early September, I made a second batch of Spring bulb cushion panels, as well as some based on spring blossom and tulips, to keep me occupied until the garden started exploding in Spring growth. It is such an exciting time of year!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-00-16blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-18-36-17blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-10-14-00The birds are also loving the Spring! The female blackbird has made a nest in the giant bamboo, well away from the neighbourhood cats, but her mate still keeps a watchful eye on proceedings!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-09-54-36blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-14-46-05The male bower bird is in full decorating mode in his attempts to impress a mate! We caught him in the act, plucking a blue cornflower, the colour complementing his violet-blue eyes!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-09-50-40The Red-browed Firetail Finches and Eastern Spinebills are loving the insect life in the fresh new foliage.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-09-55-02blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-23-41blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-23-30The Silvereyes, Crimson Rosellas, King Parrots, and Satin Bowerbirds are feasting on the blossom!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-10-46-59blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-43-44 The latter two are also testing out the ripeness of the loquat fruit on a daily basis.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-17-15-44blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-18-06-12blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-18-08-04 It’s lovely to watch the parrots grazing in amongst the bluebells, the grass kept unmown for the bulbs, though I still hate it when the birds (I blame the bowerbirds!) cut off flower heads and new growth! Even the roses and grevillea have been attacked!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-08-46blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-08-34 And if that weren’t enough food, there is always grain to scavenge from my daughter’s budgie cage on the verandah! These birds are such characters!

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Do you think we should?
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What are they up to?
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Got it!
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I only have eyes for you!
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Lean pickings!
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A very handsome bird!

Finally, a few photos of special moments this first month of Spring… a spider web caught in the dew;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-10-06-25blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-10-07-10 a new sun for my daughter’s birthday;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-08-51-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-08-52-27 a rising moon and a beautiful fluffy sunset cloud.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-19-35-58blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1084blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1091

Favourite Private Country Gardens: Part 2

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Last week, we started looking at some of the beautiful private country gardens, which we visited during our time in Victoria. Here are a few more stunning gardens:

1. Villa Lettisier

1936 Boneo Rd Flinders   0.8 ha (2 acres)

Situated at the end of the Mornington Peninsula, we visited this amazing garden on the morning of 1st November 2009 through the Australian Open Gardens Scheme. Inspired by a love of Italy and the magnificent coastal scenery and clifftop views, the owners built a Palladian-style house (based on the 16th century architecture of Andrea Palladio) on an imposing site and commissioned well-known garden designer, Paul Bangay, to design a formal garden to complement the perfectly symmetrical villa.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 235BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 108BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 109 BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 174Originally an old dairy farm, mature pre-existing cypress, oaks and Moreton Bay figs provided a framework for the garden.  The grand driveway curves through this parkland, with the odd glimpse of the house and ocean, then straightens up to provide a long formal approach to the gravel forecourt in front of the villa.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 228BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 201BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 210 An old dairy shed was retained as a reminder of the property’s history.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 124 I loved the entrance to the walled garden with deep red climbing roses growing against bright ochre walls.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 110

The walled garden provides essential shelter against the coastal winds and echoes the symmetry and formality of the villa. It is divided into a series of garden rooms.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 203BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 206BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 133BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 126BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 127 The initial forecourt contains climbing and  bush roses and a Rugosa hedge of  ‘Blanc Double de Coubert’.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 202BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 115BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 116BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 111BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 204 Leading towards the villa are four beds of pillar roses- two pink and red; two cream and apricot, each with their own obelisk for a climbing rose and many irises. Here, the garden walls are covered with espaliered Magnolia grandiflora ‘Little Gem’. Olives provide a secondary axis, their silver grey foliage contrasting with the glossy green magnolia leaves.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 120BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 121BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 128BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 130 The centre room is created by a huge hedge of Leyland cypress, edged with clipped rosemary. Here the secondary axis is provided by fountains with wisteria. The next room is lined with walls, covered in the fragrant Rugosa rose ‘Roseraie de l’Haie’, one of my favourites, and contains four reflection pools.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 129BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 132BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 134BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 135There are two more walled areas: a delightful formal vegetable garden and a long aqua pool, set in grass. The vegetable garden is entered through a tunnel, formed by espaliered fruiting pear trees, trained over a metal arch.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 176

The walls are covered with espaliered lemon trees and the four garden beds divided by low hedges of box, lavender and curry plants.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 188BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 183BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 181BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 190BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 192 Obelisks, in the centre of the beds, support apple trees.

BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 178BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 185 The long skinny pool is lined with a hedge of box, in front of walls covered with fruiting figs.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 175And then, there were the mind-blowingly, stunning perennial borders either side of the walls, a later addition to the overall design and continuing the symmetry, equilibrium and balance of the garden.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 155BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 137BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 142BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 148BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 223BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 147BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 151 Gates were put into the walls on either side to access the perennial beds and hedges of olive trees protect the borders. BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 159BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 141One side was all pastel colours, while the other side featured a bold, dramatic colour range.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 161BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 162BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 166BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 169BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 226 This garden is rarely open to the public, but it was open last March as part of the Mornington Peninsula Garden Tour, a full day costing $195 per person and run by Open Gardens Victoria and featuring four gardens : The Garden Vineyard already discussed; Rick Eckersley’s Musk Cottage, a garden I have yet to visit and not to be confused with Musk Farm Garden, described later in this post; Cruden Farm (see : https://candeloblooms.com/2016/08/02/part-2-favourite-private-gardens-historic-gardens-part-2/ ) and Villa Lettisier. Who knows, maybe you might be able to get a personalised tour, like we did with the gardener’s friendly basset hound, Bella!BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 2532. Barb and Pete’s Garden

283 Keys Rd Flinders     1.2 ha  (3 acres)

The same day (1st November 2009), we visited Barbara and Peter Labb’s garden, also open through the Open Gardens Scheme and  equally impressive, but in a totally different way. Peter and Barbara bought the small farm in 1994.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 355There was an established garden and windbreaks along the driveway and the south side of the house, as well as young plantations of Swamp Gum (Eucalyptus ovata) in the damp gullies of the paddocks. Barb and Pete were keen to link the garden with the paddock plants to create a wildlife corridor, and to this end, they built an informally shaped dam with a floating island and planted the dam walls with native trees and the house paddock with hardy shrubs with aromatic foliage and nectar-producing flowers.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 319BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 367BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 366BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 385BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 269 BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 362BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 360BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 307BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 371They now have plenty of birds and six frog species frequenting the dam.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 330BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 333There was also a long preexisting pergola, which initially finished at the start of the paddock. It was extended in 2004 to connect the old garden with the newer parts of the garden. The pergola is covered in climbing roses.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 295BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 304BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 370 Pete and Barb love their old roses and have planted over 200 different types from old-fashioned Ramblers to Rugosas and Species roses, like the wonderful hedge of Stanwell Perpetual, which lines the driveway (Photo 4). Photo 5 is Mutabilis.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 317BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 309BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 321BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 337BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 260 They are under-planted with lots of drought-tolerant annuals and perennials: self-seeding poppies and forget-me-nots; geraniums and catmints; culinary herbs like borage, thyme and lemon verbena and companion plants for pest control (pyrethrum and nasturtiums).BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 323BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 338BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 344 They use comfrey, with its deep roots, to bring up nutrients from the subsoil, and mulch to break down the heavy clay soil. Dense planting also shades the soil and prevents runoff.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 325BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 327 The lawn is planted with an avenue of claret ash. Asparagus, rhubarb and sweet peas are planted in the vegetable garden and there is a worm farm and beehives, as well as a new orchard.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 256BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 257BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 258BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 331In 2004, their son David built a glass shed, timber studio and loggia, overlooking the dam, for family gatherings.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 267BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 300BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 284 The new garden around the buildings was designed with climate change in mind and contains native flora and succulents amongst the gravel.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 390BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 276BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 285BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 272BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 286BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 277BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 283 It even has its own little creek with its own ecosystem.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 391 It is an interesting garden with lots of colour and texture and lots of grasses and sedges.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 290BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 291BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 382BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 402BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 381BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 398BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 397 I loved all the sculptures.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 288BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 261BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 282 I also loved the fire pit and the seating and the huge plate glass windows, looking into the garden and over the dam –a perfect position to view all the visiting wildlife and unwind!BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 270BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 271BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 265BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 306

3. Musk Farm

11 School Rd. Musk  Between Trentham and Daylesford   3.5 acre garden, 32 ha property

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s3711069.htmBlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 199BlogPrivCountry20%Reszd2016-07-14 15.12.19We visited another inspirational garden on 25th October 2009 : Musk Farm, which was created on an old school playground by Stuart Rattle, a leading Australian interior designer. The 1871 rural school was closed in 1992 and the school gardens, for which the students had won numerous awards, fell into disrepair and were smothered by weeds and blackberries. When Stuart bought the place in 1998, there was a windbreak of mature Monterey Cypress trees, a large Blue Cedar planted in the late 1870s; a school oval, an old tennis court, a toilet block (which became a potting shed), a small shelter shed from the 1950s (which was transformed into a Summer House) and miles of concrete paths. The map comes from the Musk Farm garden guide book, which we bought on the day that we visited.

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He renovated the 1870s schoolhouse, then developed a beautiful romantic garden, inspired by the English Arts and Crafts movement.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 127 A series of defined areas are integrated into a whole by walkways, interconnecting architectures, extensive hedging and garden ornamentation.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 166BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 216BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 149BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 155BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 152BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 157The garden is more formal on the upper areas near the house and becomes increasingly informal toward the wild and wooded areas beyond the old oval.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 154BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 209BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 179BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 186BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 192BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 187 The garden displays strong design principles, as well as allowing Stuart to indulge in his  individual plant passions (eg his collections of Galanthus, Rhododendrons and Viburnums).BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 161BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 177

With rich volcanic soil, a cool climate and an annual rainfall of 1000 mm, Stuart was spoilt for choice when it came to plant selection, although the long drought from 2001 to 2009 was a major challenge for the lawn and the rhododendrons!BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 156BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 175 The garden is constantly changing and evolving.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 131BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 145BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 146 The 14 garden rooms include : a Motor Court; a Rondel; a Trellis Garden; a Shade Garden; a Summer Garden; a Terrace; a Picking Garden; a Chestnut Lawn and Viburnum Border; a Pear Walk (Manchurian Pears, under-planted with Hypericum); a Court Garden on the old tennis court; Galanthus beds; a Rhododendron Garden; the Oval and Basin (a pond replacing the old school cricket pitch); a Woodland with thousands of daffodils and bluebells; and an Autumn Garden.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 200 The rooms are divided by large clipped hedges of English Box (Buxus sempervirens), Viburnum tinus, and the traditional Edwardian hedging plant, Privet (Ligustrum vulgare). There are so many treasures in this garden from the  rare Galanthus to some of my favourite climbing old roses and species roses ; the viburnum and rhododendron collections; the tree fuschias, hellebore species, self-seeding aquilegia, dwarf gladioli and bearded iris.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 182BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 174 I particularly loved the Picking Garden with its twin blue urns, the masses of recurrent scented roses and buddlejas, dianthus, geranium, herbaceous peonies and a 4o year old Tree Peony.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 142Unfortunately, Stuart met an untimely end in 2013 and Musk Farm Garden  was sold in 2014. While it may not be possible to visit the garden, you can visit it in a book, recently written by Paul Bangay, called ‘Stuart Rattle’s Musk Farm’, now available online on Paul’s website: http://www.paulbangay.com.au/stuart-rattles-musk-farm-now-available/

4. Lixouri

24 Hague’s Rd Barkers Creek    20 acre property; 2 to 3 acre garden      Ph (03) 5474 2747

http://www.gardenatlixouri.com/Lixouri_Site/Garden_History.html

I was blown away by this beautiful Mediterranean garden, which we visited on 31st October, 2009, as part of the Castlemaine and District Festival of Gardens Inc. Max and Margaret Beyer bought the land in 1980, after spending 7 months with their two young daughters on the Greek island of Cephalonia. They had previously spent 8 months in Greece, back in the mid 1960s, and had a love affair with the Mediterranean style and way of life.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 028BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 029They built a two-storey mud brick house over a period of 20 years, starting in 1983, and by 2000, the garage/gallery and Margaret’s stained glass studio were completed.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 060BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 063 They were keen to be as self-sufficient as possible and are totally reliant on their own solar power, with the odd use of a backup generator in Winter. Heating (and cooking) is provided by a slow combustion heater, with a hydronic heating system attached, and they have a solar hot water system.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 082BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 032BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 050 They planted 260 olive trees of 3 different varieties : ‘Barouni’; ‘Californian Queen’ and an Italian variety ‘Fratoia’ along the gravel driveway in 1981, having to hand-water every single one by bucket during the 1981 to 1982 drought, but it was worth it, as they produced 125 litres of olive oil from the 2014 crop.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 035The north-facing terrace garden in front of the house was the first part of the garden to be planted, but the combination of drought and the hard, compacted clay soil made growth difficult and slow. The climate of Central Victoria is very similar to the Mediterranean climate with short, clear seasons: a cool sunny Spring with showers; hot dry Summers; a rainy Autumn, which can have crisp sunny days and wet cold Winters, also with crisp sunny days. The garden owes much of its success to clever plant selection, soil improvement with organic mushroom compost and old cow manure and heavy mulching, with a  7 cm  layer of pea straw, cane or lucerne, to reduce water evaporation and keep the soil cool. Most of the plants are hardy and drought-tolerant.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 033BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 047Here is a photograph of a map of the garden, taken from page 172 of ‘Gardens of the Goldfields: A central Victorian Sojourn’ by Mandy Stroebel (2010) :BlogPrivCountry20%Reszd2016-07-14 16.41.13The house is shaded in the front by a large post-and-beam pergola, covered in the Cherokee Rose, Rosa laevigata, a white muscat grapevine and a purple wisteria, grown from cuttings of an old vine on a house near Barkers Creek School.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 042BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 040

Earthen pots and elegant urns hold colourful succulents and bonsai conifers, which thrive in the dappled shade underneath the pergola. The use of large terracotta pots is repeated throughout the garden and reinforces the Mediterranean feel.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 031BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 038BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 037The front garden is divided into three terraces by sandstone walls, built by local stone mason, Russell Jenkins. BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 081Recycled brick, sandstone steps and gravel (locally sourced from Dunolley) paths wind through the garden beds and terraces to the olive grove and down to a tranquil dam with a sandy beach and a wooden jetty, whose steps are flanked by bowls of succulents. The dam is fringed with yellow water iris, grevilleas, birch and willow and white gums and is set against a backdrop of blue gums, paperbarks and almonds. Max buried water pipes under all the garden beds and driveways, so that every single drop of water feeds into the dam.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 083BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 045BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 036BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 079 Above the dam are two smaller ponds, which filter the water en route and are lined with prostrate grevilleas, water iris, grasses and small trees.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 068BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 061

The terrace garden is a mixture of native and exotic plants and trees : tightly clipped, rounded forms of white cistus, hebes, grevilleas, westringia  and salvias and soft flowing plantings of old roses; self-seeded Flanders poppies and Queen Anne’s Lace; artemisias and echiums , bearded iris; euphorbias; lavenders, carpet thyme and rosemary are set against accent plants, like the upright punctuation marks of pencil pines and the structural shapes of cordylines, yuccas and New Zealand flax plants.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 044BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 039BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 051

A tall curved wall, between the house front and the garage, divides the terrace garden and the studio garden and protects a mature lemon tree from frost.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 080

It is covered with buttercup-yellow ‘Mermaid’ rose blooms in Spring and Summer and has an arched gateway, topped with a tiny belfry, redolent of Mediterranean villages, and iron gates designed by  local artist, Trefor Prest, which lead from the eastern courtyard to the gallery/garage and Margaret’s studio.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 065BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 048BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 052

A porch with a balcony and wrought iron balustrade, added in 2005, reinforces the Mediterranean feel.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 070BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 064BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 066 The bank below the garage/ gallery is covered in rock and planted with ground covers and thymes.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 077The studio garden overlooks a natural reflective pond and contains a Japanese maple, a white Judas Tree and a Sorbus, which has white Spring flowers and orange Autumn berries. There are plans to build a wooden Japanese bath house behind the garage.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 043BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 062BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 069The vegetable garden is directly behind the house and is very productive in Spring and Autumn with carrots, lettuce, broccoli, chard, garlic and Spring and brown onions, mixed in with sweet peas, oriental and Flanders poppies, lavender and sunflowers. Summer vegetable gardening is limited by the heat and the hot dry winds.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 072BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 074BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdearly nov 2010 073 The vegetable bed is edged with  dry sandstone walls and screened from the house by the southern embankment, which has been planted up with native and exotic shrubs and plantings including: a Chinese Pistaccio, a flowering cherry and dogwoods; coastal banksias, correas, bottlebrush and grevilleas; ceanothus; hardenbergias; roses; hollyhocks, wall flowers and self-seeded Californian poppies. Other deciduous trees in the garden include oaks, a Japanese Pagoda tree, an Albizia with lime-green flowers, a Manchurian pear and a medlar.

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Lixouri is a very impressive garden with a lovely warm feel and is well worth visiting if you get a chance. The garden is open by arrangement or can be visited during the annual Castlemaine and District Festival of gardens Inc. This year’s festival is from 29th October to the 6th November 2016. See : http://www.festivalofgardens.org/.

These are only a small number of the amazing gardens we saw in Victoria and I haven’t even started on the other Australian states! I will also be writing a few in-depth posts in the future on individual gardens like Red Cow Farm, Sutton Forest, Southern NSW, and Glenrock, Tenterfield, Northern NSW. Next month, I will be focusing on specialty private gardens.

 

 

Favourite Private Country Gardens: Part 1

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There are so many beautiful country gardens in Australia and many highly talented gardeners and garden designers. The wide variety of climatic conditions, altitudes and soil types allow for a huge variation in gardens and the size of country gardens is only limited by  the time required to maintain them. During our sojourn in Victoria from 2009 to 2014 , we were lucky enough to visit a large number of gardens through the Australian Open Gardens Scheme and local garden festivals , including the Castlemaine and District Festival of Gardens Inc.  and the Dandenongs Garden Festival. Fortunately, it is still possible to visit these gardens through these local festivals and Open Gardens Victoria has taken up where the Australian Open Garden Scheme left off, though the number of open gardens is greatly reduced. Some properties have since been sold or are up for sale and some are or have become accommodation, so it is still possible to visit most of them, even if it does cost a bomb! I guess at least you get them to yourselves, rather than having to contend with huge crowds! Because this post is so large, I have divided it into two sections:

Part 1 : Beechmont; Westport; Bringalbit; Corinella Country House; and The Garden Vineyard

Part 2 : Villa Lettisier; Barb and Pete’s Garden; Musk Farm; and Lixouri

1.Beechmont  

12 Mernda Rd Olinda (3km from Olinda) 4.05 Ha (of which the garden is 2.3 hectares)BlogPrivCountry20%Reszd2016-07-13 15.05.18Illustrated map from Open Gardens visit.

We visited this lovely garden on the 11th  October 2009, as part of the Dandenongs Garden Festival: Inspiring in Spring, and it certainly was! At the time, it was owned by Simon and Marcia Begg, who bought the hilltop garden with its 1970s house and separate 2 bedroom cottage in January 1997.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 075BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 016The flat area on the north side of the house already had established garden beds containing viburnums, rhododendrons, edgeworthii, camellias, magnolias, cornus and other exotics.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 034BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 028BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 030 There were a number of large native and exotic trees including Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans); Blackwood Wattle (Acacia melanoxylon); a very tall Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera); a Bunya Bunya Pine and Hoop Pine and 8o year old Beech trees of the Fagus and Nothofagus genera, hence the name: ‘Beechmont’. Marcia and Simon were keen to collect as many beeches from both genera as possible.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 092BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 091BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 061Most of their initial efforts were directed to the south side of the house, converting an old horse paddock to sweeping lawns and garden beds with strong vistas and focal points and a natural progression from one are to the next. At the front of the house, a blue crystal-glazed porcelain urn marks the top of a serpentine rill (pebble water run), which flows down the hill to a large reflective pond.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 066BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 063BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 062They raised many of the plants themselves, including shrubs, cottage garden plants and Vireya rhododendrons. Garden beds are heavily mulched and watered by drip irrigation. An  irrigation bore, installed in 2004, was a godsend during the drought and is supplemented by large rain water tanks.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 093BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 036BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 022BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 014BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 012In 2002, they remodelled the old tennis court on the north side of the house into a walled garden with a central pond and perennial borders, affectionately dubbing the project ‘the SKI garden’ (‘Spending the Kids Inheritance’). The old tennis court fence is clothed in clematis and wisteria. The entrance is marked with the owners’ initials. The walled garden is connected to the South Garden by the Blueberry Avenue, which contains scented plants and a daphne collection.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 042BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 047BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 046In 2006, the nursery was replaced with a parterre garden, inspired by Alice In Wonderland. Hedged flower beds in the shape of card suits (hearts, diamonds, clubs and spades) frame a central garden bed with a terracotta urn.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 049 Two recently-released Wollemi Pines, Wollemi nobilis, were planted in the north and south lawn. Smaller beds were extended to get the proportions right in the garden and the hen yard became another Vireya garden. In 2009. a new shade house and propogation bed for vireyas was built.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 055BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 051Other features of the garden include: a hidden secret garden; a wheel parterre; a native garden with spectacular views as far as the Mornington Peninsula on a clear day; a South African bed; a rare plants bed; a bed of maples and deciduous azaleas;  a rockery with small ponds and quirky sculptures throughout the garden.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 076BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 079BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 074BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdoctober 2 041In November 2012, the Beggs sold to Cherrie Miriklis, the owner of Flowers Vasette, the well-known Fitzroy florist (http://flowersvasette.com.au/). Read her story on : http://www.yarravalleymagazine.com.au/beechmont-olinda/.

The house, now known as Beechmont Garden Retreat, is used for luxury accommodation. See : http://www.vrgetaways.com.au/beechmont-gardens/.

2.Westport

74 Ferrier Rd New Gisborne   1.6 ha (4 acres)  3km to Gisborne; 52 km to Melbourne CBD.

Set at the foot of Mt. Macedon, Westport is another lovely garden to visit in the Spring-time. We discovered this garden on 8th September 2014.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 062BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 060 At the time, it was owned by Neil Robertson, who was the National Executive Officer of the Australian Open Gardens Scheme from 1990 to 2010. He did have the property on the market in October 2014, so I don’t know if he still owns it. His forebears by marriage, the  Ferrier-Hamiltons, were the original squatters in the area in the 1840s and when Thomas Ferrier-Hamilton died, he left each child 80 acres of land. His son, Vereker, who married Neil’s Great Aunt Nina, in 1898, built a country house on his portion.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 033BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 034BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 037BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 109 Vereker and Nina were keen gardeners and planted many trees, which still exist today: pines on the Western boundary; oaks lining the driveway; pinoaks near the house; a weeping elm; a large collection of Arbutus and a grove of silver birches, as well as thousands of daffodils, some bred by Alister Clark.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 118BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 096BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 106BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 019BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 016BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 011Neil bought Westport from a cousin 32 years ago. The house had been let for 25 years and the middle storey of the original garden had disappeared, except for 5 camellias, a couple of rhododendrons, a winter woodbine and roses.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 050BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 041BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 043BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 044BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 047 Over the past 30 years, Neil planted more trees, shrubs and bulbs within the framework of the old garden, defined by the mature trees.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 077BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 081BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 080BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 083 Shrubberies screen garden rooms, creating surprise and illusion across the flat site. Plants had to cope with poor drainage, frosts, hot Summers and hot, dry northerly winds.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 111BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 120BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 066BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 055Shrubs include : camellias, viburnums, daphne, spireae, magnolis, forsythias, Winter woodbine, wintersweet, chaenomeles and lots of old roses!BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 071BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 054BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 048BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 051 There are hellebores and masses of bulbs- daffodils, muscari and bluebells.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 122BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 101BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 074BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 113BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 049BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 012And lots of pot plants.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 036BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 0323a.Bringalbit

512 Sidonia Rd Sidonia via Kyneton   4 ha garden  Susan Fox   Ph (03) 5423 7223

http://bringalbit.com.au

We first discovered this lovely garden on 6th September 2009, as part of the annual Kyneton Daffodil and Arts Festival, then stayed here in a delightful old rustic cottage on the weekend of the 6th – 7th June 2014.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4385BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 150 This historic property on the granite hills, 18 km north of Kyneton, is owned by the Fox family and has an 1870s granite homestead and 10 acres (4 ha) of parkland and garden, developed over 130 years. Here is Susan’s map of the property, which hangs on the wall of the cottage, as well as photos of Susan and her dogs.

BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4463BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4462BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4442Originally 1263 acres of land, the property was settled by John Apperley in 1858. Between 1866 and 1877, the current homestead was built in stages by John Lang, starting in 1871. William Fysh, who owned the property between 1887 and 1908, landscaped the lake and planted the surrounding parkland with oaks, deodars, pine windbreaks and poplar stands. Exotic trees surround the ornamental lake, which looks beautiful in December with its pink and white water lilies in flower. The walk down to the lake is enhanced by a mass planting of deep roses, salvias and agapanthus on the embankment of the old tennis court. The 1km long driveway is lined with Mahogany Gums.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4433BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4424The Fox family bought the property in 1990 and restored the house and garden.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4482BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 146 There were no garden beds, so they developed a paddock on the northern side of the house into a garden, containing a crab apple walk, a quince walk, shrubs and perennial borders, a vegetable garden, an olive grove and an orchard.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 157BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4382BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4377BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4450 They used lichen covered honey-colored stone, quarried on the property, to build walls, steps and terraces.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4436BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4438BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4466Susan is an artist and her touch can be seen in perennial border at the front of the house, which has a blue-and-grey colour scheme with lavenders, delphiniums and forget-me-nots. Cecile Brunner, Iceberg and Sea Foam roses climb up the verandah poles. Round the back of the house, stone walls edge a lavender garden with rose standards of Penelope and Delicata, under-planted with shrub rose, Honey Flow, and David Austin’s Mary Rose. The north-facing sunny terrace beds are filled with roses, lavenders, dianthus and gaura and edged with the silver-foliaged Snow-in-Summer. An arbour, covered with a Mme Alfred Carrière rose, leads to a scented garden, surrounded by lilac, and a parterre of santolina, set off by a weeping white hawthorne. I would love to see this garden in Summer for all its old roses! There was still an old bloom of Souvenir de St Anne during our Winter stay (1st photo below).BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4467BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 158BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 159The 50 metre long Crab Apple Walk rises from a double perennial border of mauve, white and pink Spring blooms, followed by white and blue agapanthus, lemon evening primroses and red hot pokers in Summer. The 60 metre long Quince Walk is spectacular in Spring (flowers) and Autumn (fruit and Autumn foliage) and leads to an old gate overlooking the Cobaw Hills.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4480 The daffodil walk is a highlight in September and leads to an original stone shed, shaded by an huge old evergreen oak, Quercus canariensis.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4409BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4428 There are many pots of succulents on the blue stands next to the shed and beside the house.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4429BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4376 Peacocks, guinea fowl, bantams and chooks free-range the garden, while cats snooze in the sun on the cottage verandah and long-horned Highland Cattle and black-faced sheep graze the surrounding paddocks.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4449BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 148BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4484BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 160BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4445BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4419BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4398BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 147BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4405 The old chook house is smothered by Lamarque, a lemony-scented Noisette rose. BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4414BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 143Bringalbit has an historic old shearing shed, numerous farm buildings and a range of self-contained accommodation options.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4448BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4459BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4452 We stayed in the Gardeners Cottage beside the main house (a very reasonable tariff of $115 per night) and the décor was delightfully eclectic and quaint!  I would highly recommend staying there!BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 149BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4389 BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4469 (2)BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4475There is also self-contained accommodation in the Shearers’ Shack and Woolshed Hill House and for a bit of old-fashioned luxury, bed-and-breakfast in the grand old house.BlogPrivCountry20%ReszdIMG_4451 The website has a terrific video about the house and garden. The garden and shearing shed are available for weddings, parties and corporate functions. It is also open to the public every weekend 10am-4pm and weekdays by appointment at $5 per head. If you are visiting during the Kyneton Daffodil Festival, it is also worth visiting nearby ‘Corinella’:

3b. Corinella Country House

998 Kyneton-Metcalfe Rd Green Hill  Ph (03) 5423 2474  or 0438 269 651

First farmed in the 1870s and owned by Sue and Steve Wright, the 130 year old house has been fully restored  and is now a guest house. Self-catering and bed-and-breakfast options are available. See: http://www.corinella.net/.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 197BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 203 The 2 acre garden has no lawn, just gravel paths winding through established old trees (planted in the 1900s), shrubs and masses of bulbs.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 180BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 198BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 189BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 181 In Spring, the garden is a sea of gold and blue!BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 202BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 188BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 190BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 178BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 186 4.The Garden Vineyard

174 Graydens Rd. Moorooduc   1.5 hours from Melbourne on the Mornington Peninsula   1ha

Phone : (03) 5978 8661 or 0408 351 809

http://www.gardenvineyard.com.au/BlogPrivCountry20%Reszd2016-07-14 10.25.40While a little too formal and ordered for me, yet very bold and dramatic, this garden is very famous and has been described as one of the ten best gardens in Australia by Don Burke (http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/fact-sheets/gardens/garden-vineyard-2/#) and is featured on Monty Don’s Round the World in 80 Gardens. See: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xwzd7r_around-the-world-in-80-gardens-2-australia-and-new-zealand_lifestyle.   (31 minutes into the video). The map above is from our visit on the day.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 529It was recommended to us by my sister, who raved about it, so we visited it on the 11th April 2010, which was very fortuitous, as it was the last weekend that the garden was open to the public (as well as the first time it had opened in Autumn). Its owners, Di and Doug Johnson, were selling and they opened it to thank the Australian Open Garden Scheme for all their support. The day before (10th April), 1200 visitors turned up! Little wonder that Di looked so exhausted!!! Di is English, so when they bought the property in 1996, she was keen to establish an English-style garden.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 559 The sparse farmland only had a couple of Eucalyptus scoparia and Spotted Gum, Eucalyptus maculata, as well as sheoaks, banksias and 1 acre Pinot Noir grapes.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 535BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 532 The top soil was thin and acidic and had a mix of shale and gravel underneath, locally known as spew, which compacts in Summer and turned to mush in Winter. Add to this the westerly orientation of the block with baking afternoon sun and only 600-750 mm annual rainfall and they certainly faced an uphill challenge!BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 514 With the help of landscape designer Robert Boyle and gardener Martin Edney and plants bought from Lambley Nursery and Clive Blazely’s Diggers catalogue, Di and Doug have created a wonderful garden with a strong architectural structure of different garden rooms, bound by tall hedges and perfectly clipped plant shapes, sustainable plantings and stunning vistas.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 506BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 528 Symmetry is achieved with the repetition of plants in different sections of the garden design eg the clipped balls of westringia throughout the garden and lemon-scented gums repeated in different garden rooms.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 572BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 525BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 511 The soil has been improved over the years by applying copious amounts of horse and chook manure. A slow release complete fertilizer is raked in in late Winter, only becoming active when the soil temperature reaches 21-23 degrees. Pellets of ‘Organic Life’ are applied in early April and late Winter and lime is added to the soil every few years. The garden borders are watered by drip irrigation.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 571BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 546BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 545BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 540Di started with the walled garden, which was inspired by a Mediterranean garden in Provence, created  by Nicole de Vésian (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZQWbQ0QhRg) and featuring a colour palette of grey and green tones, sculpted plants and stone walls, benches and balls.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 557BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 501 They excavated the boggy ground and built walls with English bond brickwork. The walled garden was replanted 2 ½ years before our visit with plants with low water needs, including lagerstroemias, clipped globes of Pittosporum tobira (under-planted with Mondo grass) and bush germander, Teucrium fruticans, natural mounds of Lavandula angustifolia ‘Grosso’, regular and prostrate rosemary, cistus, Buddleia crispa and Berberis thunbergia.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 562BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 564BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 567BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 565 They designed a small gravel courtyard to the west of the walled garden, surrounded by a hedge of drought-tolerant escallonia (Escallonia iveyi), then turned their attention to a long grass walk with perennial and shrub borders, full of heliotropes (Heliotropium arborescens), salvias (Salvia x sylvestris ‘Lubecca’ and Salvia x superba ‘Superba’), achilleas (Achillea millefolium ‘Fanal’), echiums (Echium candicans), cardoons (Cynara cardunculus), agastaches, grasses and roses.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 536BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 537BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 542BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 539BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 541BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 547 The long grass walk is connected to the formal areas by an avenue of lemon-scented gums, under-planted with lavender, helichrysum, echiums, westringia and artemisia, all drought-tolerant plants.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 552BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 551 The formal Italianate Garden was created next with silver borders and clipped lillypilly standards, Syzgium australe.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 510BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 527BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 530BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 531 The final addition to the garden was an Australian native garden, created by daughter Jenny and filled with acacias, grevilleas, banksias, hakeas, eucalypts, correas, lillypillys, eriostemons, teucriums, wattles, buddlejas and westringias.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 521BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 523BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 519 There is also a vegetable garden.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 508A seat at the southern end of the garden provides a view through the silver borders and formal garden over the Australian garden to the Mt Eliza ridge. There is also a lovely view from the terrace over the lawn to the vineyard. The latter was extended to 3 acres with 1 acre Pinot Gris grape vines and a copse of silver birches, Betula pendula ‘Jack Moss’, was planted at the entrance to the property. Pierre de Ronsard roses climb the verandah posts of the house and are under-planted with Lavandula stoechas ‘Ploughmans’ Purple’.

Sue and Daryl McFall bought the property in October 2010. The garden can still be visited for prearranged groups of 12 people at $20 per head.BlogPrivCountry50%Reszdmarchapril 558

Next week, I will be posting Favourite Private Country Gardens: Part 2 , which will cover the wonderful gardens of Villa Lettisier; Barb and Pete’s Garden; Musk Farm; and Lixouri.

 

 

Spring Bulbs in My Cutting Garden : Feature Plant for September

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Since it is the very start of Spring, I thought I would celebrate with a post on my favourite Spring bulbs in the cutting garden. I have also included bulbs from other parts of the garden, where they fit into the same bulb type. These were our first jonquils for the season.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 15.05.18Most of the bulbs were sourced from Tesselaars (https://www.tesselaar.net.au).BlogFavNurseries20%Reszd2016-02-25 11.24.43BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 280BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 248 However, I bought the Narcissus panizzianus and Lady Tulips from Lambley Nursery (http://lambley.com.au/) and the rest of the latter from the Drewitt Bulbs stall (2nd photo below) at the Lanyon Plant Fair (http://www.drewittsbulbs.com.au/).BlogFavNurseries20%Reszd2016-02-25 11.24.04BlogSpecialistnurseries20%ReszdIMG_0650 (2)The erlicheer jonquils were given to us by a friend. We have been enjoying the jonquils for the last few weeks of Winter, so I will start with Narcissi, then progress to tulips, freesias, anemones and ranunculus.

Narcissi           Also known as  Daffodil, Daffadowndilly, Jonquil and Narcissus

Belonging to the Family Amaryllidaceae, the genus name comes from the Greek word for ‘intoxicated‘: ‘narcotic’ and is associated with the ancient Greek myth of Narcissus, who fell in love with his own reflection in a pond and drowned.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 178The genus arose in the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene epochs and is native to the meadows and woods of Southern Europe and North Africa, with the centre of diversity in the Western Mediterranean, especially the Iberian Peninsula. Both wild and cultivated plants have naturalized widely and are hardy to Zone 5. They have been cultivated since early times and were introduced into the Far East before the 10th century. They became increasingly popular in Europe before the 16th century and were an important commercial crop in the Netherlands in the late 19th century. Some species are now extinct, while others are threatened by increased urbanization and tourism. They are the national flower of Wales and a symbol of Spring, as well as cancer charities.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 188Description:  Perennial herbaceous, bulbiferous geophytes, which die back after flowering to an underground storage bulb. The bulbs are long-lived and naturalize easily.

Mainly green or blue-green narrow, strap-like leaves arise from the bulb.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.51.22Flowers normally solitary (ie one flower per stem), though there are cluster varieties, which bear their flowers in an umbel. They are generally white, yellow or both, though salmon varieties have been bred. The perianth consists of 3 parts:

Floral tube above the ovary

Outer ring of 6 tepals = undifferentiated sepals and petals

Central cup or trumpet-shaped corona

The flowers have 6 pollen-bearing stamens around a central style and an inferior trilocular ovary and are hermaphroditic, being insect-pollinated by bees, flies, butterflies and hawkmoths. They flower for 4 months from late Winter (June in Australia) to Late Spring (October in Australia) and are divided into early/ mid and late blooms. The fruit is a dry capsule, which splits to release lots of fine black seeds.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 190There are thousands of hybrids, but they are generally divided into 13 sections with up to 50 species : Trumpet; Large-cupped cultivars; Small-cupped cultivars; Double Daffodil cultivars; Triandrus cultivars; Cyclamineus cultivars; Jonquilla cultivars; Tazetta Daffodil cultivars; Poeticus daffodils; Bulbocodium cultivars (Hoop Petticoats); Split Corona cultivars and 2 Miscellaneous groups.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 016Growing Conditions:

Cold is required to initiate flowering, though some varieties tolerate more heat.

Full Winter sun is best or at least half a day.

A well-drained soil is also best.

Plant bulbs in Autumn with pointy end up 1.5 – 5 times the height of the bulb deep and 10 – 12 cm apart or more if naturalizing. Well-rotted manure can be dug into the bed a few weeks before planting the bulbs. The application of potash or a slow release fertilizer with low nitrogen content will encourage more flowers. After flowering, the leaves should be left to dry out over 6 months to allow photosynthesis to replenish the nutrients and energy of the bulb for the next season’s flowering. Bulbs should not be watered when dormant. Daffodils are propagated by bulb division. Diseases include: viruses (eg yellow stripe virus); fungal infections; and basal rot. Pests include: narcissus bulb  fly larvae; narcissus eelworm; nematodes, bulb scale mites; and slugs.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.23.35Use:  Ornamental plants for Spring displays;BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 074 Mixed herbaceous and shrub borders;BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdseptember 189 Deciduous woodland plantings; Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.20.33Rock gardens; Naturalized meadows and lawns and even in containers.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 019They are excellent cut flowers, lasting for up to 1 week, but should not be mixed with other flowers in the same vase, unless preconditioned. Their stems emit a toxic slime, which clogs up the stems of the other flowers, causing their stems to wilt prematurely. Flowers should be picked while still in bud and no floral preservative should be used in the cold water – only a few drops of bleach. To precondition narcissi, cut the stems on the diagonal and stand alone in cold water for at least 24 hours, then discard the water, wash the container thoroughly and arrange with other flowers without recutting the stems of the Narcissi.BlogDaylightslavg BG20%ReszdIMG_1470 Care should be taken when handling, as the sap can cause dermatitis, commonly known in the trade as ‘Daffodil Itch’. All daffodils are poisonous if ingested, though they have been used in traditional medicine. Narcissus produce galantamine, which is used in the treatment of Alzheimer’s Dementia.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.51.36The range of daffodils and jonquils is so extensive (there are over 25 000 cultivars!) that I am only describing the types I have in my garden. For more information on daffodils, there is a beautiful book called:  ‘Daffodil: Biography of a Flower’ by Helen O’Neill. Other titles can be found on :  http://thedaffodilsociety.com/wordpress/miscellany/books-on-daffodils-some-titles-for-the-interested-amateur-grower/. In fact this site, http://thedaffodilsociety.com/wordpress/, the blog of the Daffodil Society of Great Britain, is a mine of information with links to other societies worldwide;  other sources of information; articles on daffodil history; places to see daffodils; suppliers; growth notes and interesting obscure facts about them like the use of their juice by Arabs to cure baldness and their yellow flower dye by high-born medieval women to tint their hair and eyebrows!BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdsept 2012 012Species Daffodils:

See : http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/NarcissusSpeciesFive

Narcissus poeticus: Pheasant Eye Daffodils: ‘Actaea’

I have always loved these elegant heirloom daffodils, which are one of the earliest daffodils and probably those associated with the ancient Greek myth, which gives them their name. The species was first described by Linnaeus in 1753 in his work: ‘Species Plantarum’. Their natural habitat is from Greece to France, with the northernmost wild population in a valley in West Ukraine near the Russian border.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 182They have long stems, each bearing a single flower, 7 cm wide,  with a small shallow yellow corona with a neat red rim and wide vivid, white, pointed, reflexed petals. They have an earthy clove-like fragrance. They flower late in the season and cope better with wet, poorly drained areas than most other daffodils. Best in full sun and well-drained soil, they should be planted at a depth 3 times the height of the bulb and 10 – 20 cm apart. They naturalize well.Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0442Narcissus panizzianus

Another heirloom variety, which were grown by Lambleys Nursery from wild seed collected in Italy over 20 years ago. This paperwhite tazetta daffodil grows wild from Portugal to Italy and Greece in Southern Europe and Algeria and Morocco in North Africa. The 35 cm tall stems bear up to 12 pure white flowers with a spicy fragrance in Winter. They have grey green leaves and grow well in dry parts of the garden. I have planted  4 bulbs under my deciduous maple in front of my white statue, Chloe; 5 bulbs around the rusty iron ring statue; and 5 bulbs under the Bull Bay Magnolia; but while they have all produced leaves, they are yet to flower!

Narcissus x tazetta :  Fragrant Daffodils and Jonquils:

Paperwhite Ziva N. tazetta subsp papyraceus ‘Ziva’

The most commonly grown paperwhite, this long-lived frost hardy bulb hails from the West Mediterranean region : Greece, Portugal, Morocco and Algeria and can be grown from Zones 8 – 11. They have blue-grey strap-like foliage and  45 cm tall slender stems bearing clusters of highly fragrant, musk-scented, pure white star-shaped flowers from late Winter to early Spring. The bulbs are frost hardy and should be planted at a depth  of 10 – 15 cm and 10 cm apart. They flower 2 – 3 weeks after planting.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.20.13Erlicheer

These tazetta type jonquils have highly fragrant clusters of  6 – 20 cream to ivory flowers on each stem and are 30 – 75 cm high.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.43.45 Bulbs should be planted at a depth 3 times the height of the bulbs and 10 – 12 cm apart. They naturalize easily, are good in warmer climates and are one of the first narcissi to flower. And they are really tough. Our bulbs were given to us by friends while we were still renting and they sat in a box in the dark under the house for one whole season before we finally remembered them and planted them out and even the drying shrinking bulbs survived and regained their vigour after a year in the ground!BlogTinyTreasures20%ReszdIMG_0271Golden Dawn

Another fragrant cluster daffodil with broad leaves and 40 cm tall stems, each bearing 5 pale yellow flowers (each 4.5 cm wide with an orange corona). See yellow flowers next to the Actaea in the photo below. They have a strong sweet fragrance.BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2015-09-15 09.47.35 Very similar to Soleil d’Or, they flower much  later in mid to late Spring. BlogSpring bulbs 20%ReszdIMG_1072 The bulbs should be planted at a depth 1.5 – 2 times their own height and naturalize well. BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-17 15.14.52Double Daffodils: Narcissus x pseudonarcissus:

Acropolis

A late season bulb, they are 30 – 70 cm tall and have very  double, creamy white petals and petaloids with a small deep orange cup. The planting depth is 3 times the height of the bulb and they should be positioned 10 – 20 cm apart.Blog SpringsprungFav20%ReszdIMG_0522Wintersun: Wintersun is a mid-season bulb, 30 – 70 cm tall,  with a bright yellow flower.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-17 15.15.31Miniature Daffodils: Tête à Tête

These tiny daffodils have golden yellow flowers, 3 – 4cm wide, on 15 cm stems early to mid-season. Each bulb produces more than one flower- usually up to 3 – 4 and often in pairs, with the flower heads facing each other, so they look like they are engaged in a private conversation, ‘tête à tête’, thus their name! They are placed in the Miscellaneous category, as they do not fit easily into the other types. Their seed parent was a primary hybrid of N.cyclamineus and N. tazetta ‘Grand Soleil d’Or’, while the pollen parent was N. cyclamineus.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.10.08 Bulbs should be planted 5 – 15 cm apart at a depth of 3 times their height. Tough and hardy, they are tolerant to both heat and severe cold and are perfect for small gardens, rockeries, the front of beds and pots. Mine are in my treasure garden and have just flowered for the first time! The plants are sterile, but are propagated by bulb division.BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.01.04Tulips:

Tulips are also very popular, highly hybridized bulbs, which have been cultivated since the 10th century. They belong to the Liliaceae or Lily Family and their genus name is the Latinized version of the Turkish name ‘tulbend’, meaning ‘turban’ and referring to the inverted flowers of some of the species.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 249Habitat:  Mountainous areas of temperate climates in Turkey and the Mediterranean areas. 14 wild species are still found in Turkey, but they are very different to the huge showy blooms of the modern hybridized tulips.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 274 History:  Wild collected plants were first hybridized in Persian gardens. They were very popular with the Seljuks and during the Tulip Era of the later Ottoman Empire, when they were a symbol of abundance and indulgence.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 260Introduced to Europe in 1594 by Carolus Clusius (1526 – 1609), a Flemish medical doctor and botanist, they became a subject of speculative frenzy in the Netherlands and a form of currency during a period called Tulipomania from 1634 – 1637, when a single bulb fetched an exhorbitantly high price!BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 314 They were also painted in many Dutch still-life paintings of the period. The Keukenhof in the Netherlands is the largest permanent display garden of tulips in the world. See: http://www.keukenhof.nl/en/footer/about-keukenhof/.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 334For more information about the fascinating history of tulips in both Turkey and the Netherlands, try to read a copy of ‘Tulipomania’ by Mike Dash.Blog SpringsprungFav20%ReszdIMG_0557Description:  Bulbous perennials with Spring flowers of a wide range of forms (single/ double), stem lengths, colours (single and bicolours) and flowering times (early/ mid/ late Spring). They have an upright clump habit with medium green to grey green glaucous foliage.BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-15 17.57.48 The oblong to elliptical leaves, up to 38 cm long and 10 cm wide, twist as they rise directly from the underground bulb and have acute apices.BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.45.57 The fruit is an elongated to elliptical ribbed capsule on the spent flower stem and contains many fine black seed.Blog Printemps20%ReszdIMG_1246Growing Conditions: Tulips like climates with a long cool Spring, a dry Summer and a cold Winter (Zones 5 – 7). They need a period of cool dormancy (vernalization). In areas with a warm Winter, they should be grown as an annual. They love full sun (but will tolerate partial shade) and moist, rich, well-drained soils. The bulbs should be planted in late Autumn (after 6 weeks in a brown paper bag in the fridge) at a depth of 3 times the height of the bulb- usually 10 – 20 cm deep and 10 – 15 cm apart. I usually plant them on Mothers’ Day. After flowering, leave the leaves to fully senesce before removing in Summer, so the bulbs can replenish their nutrients via photosynthesis for optimal growth the following season.BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-16 17.14.40 Propagation is by bulb division or bulblet separation, the seeds taking at least 2 years to propagate! Hybrid tulip bulbs decrease in floral performance and vigour within 1 – 2 years of planting, unlike the species tulips, which get better and better! Their primary disease is bulb rot due to poor drainage, but there are also other fungal and viral diseases. The 2nd photo below shows last year’s tulips in their 2nd season.

Blog Printemps20%ReszdIMG_1256BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-09-04 13.02.23BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-09-02 13.43.08Use:  Tulips are planted as a Spring accent in beds and borders, naturalized drifts and even in pots.BlogPrivCountry25%Reszdgrampians 3 146 They  are lovely in vases, but any wiring to support their heads must make allowance for the fact that their stems will continue to grow towards the light. Preservative should be avoided, as the sugar results in stem stretching, causing the flowers to flop over. Use cold water with 30 ppm chlorine and never mix with freshly cut Narcissi, until after the latter have been conditioned. Care should be taken when handling tulips, as their anthocyanin causes allergies and dermatitis. They are toxic to horses, cats and dogs.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 300Species Tulips (also known as Botanical Tulips)

There are 150 different wild species from Central Asia to Spain and Portugal. They differ to the hybrids in that they are usually much smaller in both plant height and flower size; have pointed petals;  flower from late Winter to  early Spring and like hot dry Summers; and they increase in bulb number and floral performance over the years. In the photo below, the hybrid tulip on the left dwarfs the Clusiana species tulips on the right.BlogSpring bulbs 20%ReszdIMG_1157 A good site to consult about species tulips is : http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/TulipaSpeciesOne.

Some of them include:

Tulipa batalinii ( yellow dwarf species) and T. linifolia (red Flax-leaved or Bokharan Tulip) from the Bukhara region of Uzbekistan and Turkey.

Tulipa kaufmanniana (Water Lily Tulip): Turkestan; Low growing; Cup shaped blooms with pointed petals of variegated base colour; One of the earliest tulips to flower.

Tulipa gregii: Turkestan; Short stems and large orange-scarlet to creamy-yellow blooms.

Tulipa altaica: Central Asia; Yellow pointed petals.

Tulipa agenensis (Eyed Tulip): Middle East; Crimson red with yellow patch around black centre inside.

Tulipa hageri: Eastern Mediterranean, Turkey and Greece. Red flowers. See photo below.

Tulipa saxatilis (Satin or Rock Tulip) : Bright pink flowers with yellow centres. Hails from the Southern Aegean islands, Crete, Rhodes and Western Turkey.

Tulipa tarda (Late Tulip): Tien Shan mountains of Central Asia; Yellow petals with white pointed tips.

Tulipa acuminata (Fire Flame or Turkish Tulip): Turkey; Rare heirloom tulip, described 1813; Flowers mid Spring; Long narrow scarlet and yellow petaloids with pointy ends.

BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 1 262

Tulipa clusiana ‘Cynthia’  Also known as Lady Tulip, Candlestick Tulip or Persian Tulip

An heirloom species, it was originally thought to be native to the Middle East, specifically Iran (Persia), Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tibet, Kashmir and the Western Himalayas, but now believed to be indigenous to Spain. It has been cultivated through much of Europe since the early 1600s. Tulipa clusiana was named after the Flemish botanist, Carolus Clusius, whose work ‘Curae Posteriores’ (1606) documents the obtaining of bulbs via a Florentine grower from Constantinople. The species is normally striped red and white like a peppermint stick, but ‘Cynthia’ is striped red and yellow. It was introduced to gardeners in 1959 by CG Van Tubergen.BlogSpring bulbs 20%ReszdIMG_1158Description:  Narrow grey-green leaves; Solitary flowers in early Spring, borne on 25 cm stems. The pointed , rose-red tepals are edged with pale yellow on the outside and are pale yellow within. I cannot wait for this bud to open and to see the flower for the first time!BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-09-04 13.01.56Growing Conditions:  They require a chilly dormancy, so cold Winters are a requirement (Zones 3 – 8). They love full sun and perfect drainage in an organically enriched sandy soil. Plant in the Autumn, 5 – 10 cm deep and 5 – 10 cm apart. Don’t water much, as too much water during Winter dormancy results in bulb rot. These bulbs do not set seed, but are propagated by bulb offsets and stolons. The bulbs naturalize easily to form large colonies.  Diseases include gray mould and mosaic virus, while pests include aphids; slugs and snails; and mice and voles.BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-09-04 14.21.32Use: Best planted in groups of more than 15 bulbs in beds, borders, rockeries and naturalized in grass. Ingestion causes severe discomfort and the sap can cause skin irritations.

Tulipa x hybrid: 

Bokassa Tulips : Bokassa White/ Bokassa Red/  Bokassa Verandi/ Bokassa Gold

Strong growth, compact foliage and medium stems. Good for pots and small gardens.Blog Printemps20%ReszdIMG_1153Blog SpringsprungFav20%ReszdIMG_0543BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.46.26Parrot Tulips: Destiny Parrot:

A flamboyant mid season tulip with pink-red feathered petals.Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0303Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0296Blog Printemps20%Reszd2015-09-22 10.59.57Lily TulipsSynaeda Orange/ Claudia (pink)/ Tres Chic (white)

Late season, urn-shaped flowers with a distinct narrow waist with pointed reflexed petals.

Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0431Blog SpringsprungFav20%ReszdIMG_0521Blog SpringsprungFav20%ReszdIMG_0617Monet Pink:

Late blooming, huge goblet-shaped flowers on tall stems.BlogBdayblessgs20%Reszd2015-10-09 14.15.19Freesias:

A member of the Family Iridaceae, Freesias were first described as a genus in 1866 by Chr. Fr. Echlon (1795 – 1868) and named after German botanist and doctor Friedrich Freese (1794 – 1878).

Habitat:  Eastern side of South Africa from Kenya to South Africa, most species being found in the Cape Provinces.

Description:    Herbaceous perennial flowering plants, 10 – 20 cm tall and wide, with fragrant funnel-shaped flowers, borne zygomorphically along one side of the stem, in a single plane, with all flowers facing upwards.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.25.20Growing Conditions:  They like wet Winters and dry Summers; Full sun or light shade; Must have good drainage and be left to dry out when dormant. Plant bulbs 5 cm deep and 5 – 8 cm apart with pointed ends up.BlogBdayblessgs20%Reszd2015-10-09 14.16.14Use:  Massed in garden beds and borders and in pots; In floristry, they are an excellent cut flower: the yellows, blues and whites have a longer vase-life than the reds and pinks, with some lasting 3 weeks when cut in bud. Use floral preservative.

Grandma’s Freesias ‘Alba’: Freesia refracta alba

The original and most fragrant of all the freesias, its cream flowers have hints of violet-blue and gold. Naturalizes in well-drained soils.

Freesia hybrids: Freesia x hybrida: Derived from crosses made in the 19th century between F. refracta and F. leichtlinii, as well as the resultant cultivars and the pink- and yellow-flowered forms of F. corymbosa..

Bergenden Freesias: Large bright single scented florets

Fantasia Freesias: Double flowers with sweet fragrance

Bedding Freesias: Shorter stems, so ideal for massed plantings and containers.

The last two bulbs in this post are members of the Ranunculaceae family, which contains 2346 species of flowering plants from 43 genera worldwide, the largest being: Delphiniums (365 sp); Clematis (325 sp); Thalictrum (330 sp); Aconitum (300 sp); and Ranunculus (600 sp).

 Anemones are a large genus with up to 150 species, including:

A.hupehensis (Chinese Anemone) and A. hupehensis var. japonica and A. hybrida (both called Japanese Anemone ): Fibrous roots; 90 cm tall; White and pink flowers late Summer and Autumn  on branching heads; Likes rich friable soil in semi-shade.

A.nemerosa (European Wood Anemone): Rhizomous roots, which spread quickly through the surface leaf litter under trees; White flowers in Spring; 40 varieties; Likes humus-rich soil and shade.

A.blanda (Winter Wind Flower): Rhizomes; Violet blue, pink or white; From SE Europe and Turkey.

A.sylvestris (Snowdrop Anemone): Nodding fragrant white flowers with golden stamens  late Spring/ early Summer; Ferny foliage; Fluffy seed heads; Spreads by underground runners and stolons.

Anemone coronaria  (Garden anemone/ Poppy anemone/ Wind flower)

Genus :  Anemone:  from the Greek word for ‘wind’ : ‘anemos’.

Species: coronaria:  meaning ‘crown’ and pertaining to head garlands.

Habitat:  Native to the Mediterranean region : Israel, Palestine, Jordan and Western Crete. In Israel, the Shokeda Forest, Northern Negev region, is a vast red carpet of wild anemones in Spring, while the Omalos Plain in the White Mountains, West Crete, is mainly a huge sea of red, but with pools of crimson, blue, magenta, mauve and white near the field edges.BlogDaylightslavg BG20%ReszdIMG_1421History: The anemone is the national flower of Israel, but is also very popular elsewhere. The Italian nobleman, Francesco Caetani, the 8th Duke of Sermoneta (1613 – 1683), is said to have planted 28 000 in his parterres at Cisterna, south of Rome. They were also commonly painted in 17th Century Dutch paintings.Blog LateWinter20%Reszd2015-08-31 11.13.19Description:

Herbaceous, tuberous perennial plants, 20 – 40 cm tall.

Basal rosette of a few palmate leaves, each with 3 deeply lobed leaflets.

Flowers are borne singly on long stems in early Spring. There is a whorl of small leaves just below each flower. Flowers are 3 – 8 cm in diameter and have 5 – 8 red, white or blue petal-like tepals, often with a black centre.Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0306

There are numerous cultivars, developed over the years by gardeners interested in breeding and showing flowers. The majority of hybrids being in the De Caen (single) and St Brigid (double) groups.Blog LateWinter20%Reszd2015-09-01 15.09.17BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-15 16.30.20Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0257Blog Gardenwakesup20%ReszdIMG_0258I planted the De Caen anemones last year and loved their single simple flowers in a multitude of colours over a long period, so I will focus on them. The De Caen group was supposedly bred by Mme Quetel de Caen, but certainly they were hybridized and cultivated in the Caen and Bayeux regions of France. Crosses between the single Anemone coronaria and other singles like : the starry A. pavonina, which grows wild in Greece; A. hortensis; and  the scarlet A. fulgens, resulted in hybrids like the deep purple-blue Mr Fokker; the bright red Hollandia; the deep pink Sylphide and the white blooms of The Bride.BlogBdayblessgs20%Reszd2015-10-08 13.36.51BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-15 16.30.36BlogBdayblessgs20%Reszd2015-10-09 14.18.08Growing Conditions:  I am definitely still learning when it comes to growing anemones, as all of my corms disappeared last year, so I have since done a bit of research! Anemones grow from knobbly corms, which can be soaked overnight before planting for faster germination and growth. They do best in Zones 7 – 10, disliking heavy Winter frost or hot humid Summers. While they like moist soil when germinating, they hate too much moisture, which results in root rot. They also don’t like other plants or weeds and should be grown alone in their own bed. Perhaps, this is why I lost my anemone corms, as I had zinnias in the same bed. Information on soil type varied from a rich loam-based soil to a light sandy soil with light compost and a deep root run- I think the moisture content and drainage is the most important factor. A well-drained raised bed in full sun seems to be the best situation. Corms should be planted with their claws facing upwards 5 cm deep and 10 cm apart. They will flower 10 – 12 weeks after planting out. While traditionally planted in Autumn for Spring, they can in fact be planted all year round for constant colour- in Spring for early Summer, and again in early Summer for an Autumn display. They should be kept dry during dormancy and can be lifted and stored till the following Autumn or treated as annuals. At least, that is what I will do next time!

Pests and diseases are minimal- they can get powdery mildew or be attacked by slugs or leaf and bud eel worms.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 250Use: These beautiful bright anemones are grown for their decorative flowers in borders and rock gardens, and also for floristry. They last well as a cut flower, up to 2 weeks, if kept cool with a drop of bleach or floral preservative in the water. Do not put in a vase with Narcissi, otherwise the anemone stems will become limp. Care should be taken when handling the flowers, as the white sap can cause skin irritation and dermatitis. Ingestion can cause mild stomach upset.Blog Printemps20%ReszdIMG_1188BlogDaylightslavg BG20%ReszdIMG_1465Ranunculus

A large genus of 600 species including buttercups, spearworts and water crowfoots.

The genus name, Ranunculus, comes from the Latin words: ‘rana’ (‘frog’) and ‘unculus’ (‘little’), ‘little frog’, being the name given to them by Roman Pliny, as many of these plants are found in wet conditions.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 281The common buttercup found along creek beds is often meadow Buttercup, R. acris, or Creeping Buttercup, R. repens, and has single gold flowers, but the Ranunculus I grow in the cutting garden is the:

Turban Buttercup or Persian Buttercup     R. asiaticus

Also known as the Persian Crowsfoot, due to the shape of the corms). The Tecolote strain is the most common type with fully double flowers, 7 – 15 cm wide, on 30 – 45 cm stems, with a wide colour variation from bicoloured picotee and pastel mixes to single colours of white, pink, red, rose, salmon, yellow, gold and sunset orange. The Bloomingdale strain is less common, on shorter stems up to 10 inches and double flowers of pale orange, yellow, red, pink and white flowers. Last year, I ordered the Picasso collection from Tesselaars and I was thrilled with their exotic jewel-like colours.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 1 282Description:  Frost hardy cool-season perennials, which do best in mild Winters and long cool Springs. Lacy, celery-like leaves which form a mound 15 – 30 cm across. BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-14 13.57.18BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-14 13.56.39Lustrous, colourful double flowers with multiple, crepe-thin satiny petals in Spring.BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-17 09.28.37BlogBdayblessgs20%Reszd2015-10-10 14.20.06BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-14 13.57.13Growing Conditions:

Ranunculus like moderate temperatures, Zones 4 – 7, but they are winter hardy to Zone 8. In fact, they need 6 – 8 weeks of cool weather in which to sprout and grow, so should be planted in Autumn for early Spring flowers (lasting 6 – 7 weeks) or late Winter for Mid-Spring (lasting 4 – 6 weeks). They prefer full sun and a well-drained soil is essential. If the soil gets water-logged, the bed should be raised with a 5 – 7 cm layer of peat moss, compost or decomposed manure. The tubers should be planted, claws facing down, 5 cm deep and 10 – 15 cm inches apart. Water well on planting and only lightly after that, though the roots should be kept cool and moist. Flowers appear 90 days after planting. They should not be watered once dormant and the corms can be lifted and stored in colder climates, where the soil freezes. Snails and mildew can be a problem, but generally they are very hardy. They can be propagated by tuber division or seed.BlogReignroses20%ReszdIMG_2987BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 158Use:  In borders and beds, accompanied by other cool-climate plants like forget-me-nots, calendula, primroses and pansies and Iceland Poppies (2nd photo below). BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 170BlogSpringpalette20%Reszd2015-10-15 16.28.23In floristry, they are also an excellent cut flower, lasting up to 10 days with floral preservative. Change the vase water often. BlogSpringfeastg20%Reszd2015-10-29 11.01.43BlogSpringfeastg20%Reszd2015-10-29 11.00.01BlogSpringfeastg20%Reszd2015-10-29 13.46.25All types of Ranunculus are poisonous to livestock. These birds don’t look too worried! In fact, they complement the colours of the Spring bulbs! Or maybe they think vice versa!BlogDaylightslavg BG20%ReszdIMG_1298This goose looks completely at home in amongst the daffodils- my daughter Caroline’s latest Feature Plant painting! Thank you, Caro!BlogSpring bulbs 20%ReszdIMG_1074

 

 

 

One Year On and Still Blogging!

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It’s hard to believe that I first started blogging one year ago to the very day – Tuesday, the 1st September  2015! Sometimes, it feels like I have been blogging a lot longer, even though I find it equally astounding that I have actually written 89 posts, including this one! It’s been a great year and I have thoroughly enjoyed this new medium of expression, with no signs of slowing down yet, so I thought I would share with you my ten good reasons for blogging, as well as what I have learnt, not only about the blogging process, but also about myself!

Ten Good Reasons For Blogging

  1. It is a verbal and visual record of the development of our garden, my career as a textile artist and our new life here in this beautiful area. Already, looking back through old posts has reminded me how much we have achieved, as well as how much was in bloom at the same time last year- consoling reassurance for the impatient gardener that I am in late Winter/ very early Spring!
  2. It’s FUN! I have always kept a daily diary – a very useful tool when trying to remember the last dental or hairdresser visit! I love writing and really enjoy putting words together. Writing a blog is a way of organizing my thoughts and making me contemplate on how much we have achieved and how best to describe my thoughts. I have always been a keen reader and library user. I learnt to speed-read during my university studies, which is great for editing and quick perusals, but completely destroys my enjoyment of good literature. Words, and the way they are strung together, need to be savoured slowly, so if the book is particularly well-written or poetic in its language, I often read it out aloud to my husband, so it slows me down! We also get the shared enjoyment of a good book and can discuss the plot and characters together. The only drawback is that Ross often snoozes off while I am reading, so I often have to recap the plot at the second sitting and I swear that I am not a monotonous reader, but it works every time! And finally, I am a very keen photographer and take far too many photos, most of which are good (even if I do say so myself!), thus making it extremely hard to be selective!  Keeping a blog allows me to display the very best and be able to access them easily!
  3. It’s creative. I really enjoy the presentation aspect as well. In the old days of photo albums, I used to really enjoy organizing the photos- something I miss in these digital days, so blogging is a way of enabling me to continue this pleasure. I love producing a beautiful post and find it endlessly challenging. I also love flower arranging for the house, so the blog is a great visual record of my endeavours. I have also featured my daughter’s artwork in each monthly Feature Plant post, and even though she much prefers to paint animals, it has been good practice for her, as well as increasing her exposure and giving us some beautiful individual artwork in the process!

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    Tiny Treasures  Photo and Painting by Caroline Stephens
  4. Sharing : It is a very accessible and easy way to share current news and photographs with family and friends, without having to write huge emails, though I prefer to think of it as more like the chapters of a book, rather than a group Christmas letter! Through my blog, I can share thoughts, books, films, recipes and links to other interesting blogs.
  5. You become part of the growing blogging community, making new friends and connecting with like-minded people, even if it’s only on a digital level! The blogging community is a very generous and supportive group, encouraging others with blogging awards like the Liebster Award for new bloggers or the Sunshine Award for positive, creative, inspiring blogs, both of which I was honoured to receive! Answering the questions, and formulating your own, makes you really think about what is important to you, heightens your awareness of other blogs and increases your own blog base (as in the blogs you follow!), as well as your own exposure! I have found the communication very stimulating and enjoyable! Blogging can be seriously addictive, so much so that you have to be careful to still maintain your life off the computer!
  6. It’s inspirational, both for your readers and yourself! I love reading other people’s blogs and responding to comments. It opens your eyes to any myriad number of future topics- a bit like Pinterest, both in the way it inspires you with all the wonderful things in the world, but also in its ability to lure you into addictive behaviour! I have also really enjoyed revisiting other peoples’ gardens, which we visited through the Open Gardens Scheme and community events in my Favourite Gardens post. Researching the gardens and selecting old photos makes you really appreciate the gardens and gives you renewed enjoyment.
  7. It’s therapeutic and diversionary! Both for those times when life knocks you for a six or when things seem a bit slow in the depths of Winter, when everything hibernates and it seems to take FOREVER for seeds or bulbs to emerge and plants to grow- particularly hard for ‘right- now- kind- of- mice’  like myself! It certainly keeps me off the streets! It is also a way of promoting beauty and positivity in a world, so often dominated in the news by the latest disaster, thus maintaining equilibrium and happiness. It is so important to appreciate the small things of every day life and focus on all the good things. The world is an amazing place with some wonderful people and incredible beauty and uniqueness!BlogBugsBBB20%Reszd2015-12-08 17.01.52
  8. It’s good writing practice for future writing. While I will probably never write a novel- I really admire people who can!- I could possibly write a craft book if I get enough experience. And through blogging, I have already produced a digital recipe book and a guide to the local area and national parks nearby!
  9. It can promote your business interests and gives you a public digital presence.
  10. By showcasing our local area, our beautiful little village and community events, it’s a way of reciprocating and thanking this wonderful community, which has welcomed us.

What I have learnt about blogging

At the start of my journey, it was a very steep learning curve, but through trial and error, I have gradually developed my blogging skills, though there is still much to learn! Here are some of the things I have discovered:

  1. Word count is best kept to less than 5000 words- preferably 3000 words, though I struggle with this constantly, as I like cover a topic thoroughly!
  2. Reduce the size of your photos. This is really really important- right from the very beginning- otherwise you will chomp through the storage megabytes in no time at all! For Word Press, photos only need to be 800 mm x 600 mm and most cameras produce far larger photos- 4000 mm x 3000 mm or 5184 mm x 3888 mm. I use a program called Irfan and reduce my photos to 20 percent, though this varies- some of my older photos are 1600 mm x 1200 mm, so they are reduced to 50 percent of their original size. You can also specify particular dimensions, if you want all your photos to be exactly the same size. It is well worth it, as Word Press has a huge amount of photo storage, if used wisely.
  3. Regularity is important. I always post late Tuesday afternoon, with the odd Thursday post thrown in occasionally for special occasions like this one ! It develops good writing habits, as well as being easier for your audience, who know when to expect a post from you. I have not had writer’s block yet, but if words are slightly slower to come, I start from the photos and before I know it, the post has written itself!
  4. Planning ahead is also important to avoid last-minute stress! I plan my post topics throughout the year and like to stay ahead by 5-6 drafts. When I started in September last year, we already had 6 months of gardening to catch up on, then from September to January, I posted a garden post on a Tuesday and another topic, varying from recipes to local area posts, on a Thursday. To avoid repetition in 2016, I reduced my blogging to just Tuesdays and changed my format to : one post on a Feature Plant, which dominates the garden that month; a post on Favourite Gardens, which we have visited in the past; a monthly garden post describing our own garden developments and blooms and a random post on recipes, our local area and national parks or thoughts. In 2017, I plan to focus on my beloved Old Roses with a monthly post on Old Rose types; a Favourite Rose Garden post- if I run out, I will also include a few posts on special individual gardens! ; a Favourite Book post- starting with Garden Books of course! ; and a continuing monthly garden post with updates on our garden and building projects.
  5. Help is at hand and the Word Press staff are very helpful if you have any problems and can usually suggest alternative solutions. For example, I had an issue with linking to other websites on the new WordPress, but was able to still do it on the old Word Press Admin page. Fortunately, the problem has finally rectified itself- I think!
  6. Edit several times, including that final moment before you post, as there are always things you miss! Having said that, you can still correct mistakes after you have posted and update the post. Also, always check your sharing button is still current, if you post on Facebook as well.

And finally:

What I Have Learnt About Myself!

  1. I LOVE research and writing, though I already knew that!
  2. I find it really hard to be selective, especially when it comes to word count and photographs!
  3. I am still safety conscious and not very adventurous when it comes to the digital world! I like stability and once I have a format and layout, with which I am happy, I tend to stick with it, rather than experiment. I am sure there are lots of nifty techniques to increase my readership, but since I write predominantly for myself and my family, it is not my primary concern, though I do enjoy attracting new followers and connecting with the blogging community.
  4. I can be obsessive and need to curb any addictive tendencies and restrict my blogging to certain days, otherwise I could probably blog forever and never get anything else done!
  5. I have greatly improved my computer skills and even though I still get the occasional stressful moment, I have discovered that everything is usually retrievable and fixable, even if you have to use a roundabout way to achieve the desired results.

I would highly recommend blogging to anyone who likes writing and photography! My life has certainly been enriched in the process!

 

 

The August Garden

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Spring is just around the corner and I can barely wait! Every day, I pop down to the garden at least three times to check on its progress and any new developments!

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Still frosty early mornings!
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Winter shade is also a constant challenge! This is a lunchtime photo!

BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.28.23 The days are very slowly lengthening, but we still get the odd sharp frost to remind us not to get ahead of ourselves and remove any protective mulch or hessian!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-14 10.50.15 The days have been just beautiful with stunning sunrises, followed by clear blue sunny skies.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 08.50.51BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 08.50.38BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.56.06 New leaf is starting to form on the quince tree (photo below) and roses in anticipation and the Spring bulbs are starting to appear.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.49.12

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My new birthday rose: Souvenir de la Malmaison

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I loved the colours on these old loquat tree leaves

I love my little treasure garden in the rockery beside the steps. Photos from all angles…!!!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 18.48.24BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-23 13.20.38BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-19 17.16.08 The Paper Daisies, Coconut Ice Pink and English primroses are all in full bloom and have been joined by miniature Tête à Tête daffodils, grape hyacinth and now a royal blue hyacinth!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.01.30BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.00.52BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-19 17.15.35BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.10.08BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.10.45BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 17.52.20 The violets behind them are still in full bloom and have even started colonizing the steps down to the garden.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 19.06.06BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-01 18.20.30BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-05 13.29.04 In the Cutting Garden, the Paperwhite Zivas have been joined by Erlicheer Jonquils, fragrant Golden Dawn and Double Daffodil, Wintersun.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.20.13BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.43.45BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.45.10BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-17 15.15.31 The Bokassa Gold tulips are in full glory, having started the month as a closed elegant bud, gradually colouring, then opening to a beautiful golden goblet, which looks magnificent when it catches the sun!BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-15 17.57.48BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-16 17.14.40BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.46.26BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.45.57 The little species tulips (photos 2 & 3) and Grandma’s Freesias (photo 1) are also in bud and the leaves of last year’s tulips (photo 4) are growing madly, though I suspect their blooms will not quite match those of last Spring!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.25.20BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.25.05BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.24.23BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 17.53.42 We also still have snowdrops (photo 1) and snowflakes (photos 2 and 3).BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-06 17.47.41BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-01 18.34.04

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Snowflakes in my neighbour’s garden

The hellebores are also persisting, despite the nasty tactics of the bowerbirds, who like to behead both hellebore and erlicheer blooms! Quite distressing, as they are still such precious specimens- I am so looking forward to the day when I have masses of hellebores and snowflakes like my neighbour’s garden, so that the odd discarded bloom doesn’t matter!!!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-05 13.20.29BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.57.39BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-14 10.47.13BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-07-31 16.58.52BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-12 14.59.52BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-07-29 12.05.08 Other plants booming in the garden include : Wallflowers in the Soho Bed;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 13.12.12BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.13.45BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 19.01.14 Daphne and Winter Honeysuckle, whose flowering season issadly drawing to a close;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.52.41Pink Diosma and red Lady X Grevillea;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.02.07BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.50.19 the red Japonica;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-05 13.15.30A few early flowers of the crab apple tree nearby;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.19.30BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.19.40A stunning new orange daisy;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.02.42BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-12 14.58.53 and of course, the loyal camellias!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-07-29 12.05.29BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-07-31 16.56.26BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.52.24BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.53.21BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.53.30BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.51.18BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.47.57BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-11 14.50.28BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-09 17.43.28So, there has still been enough flowering for the odd Winter vase.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-07-25 12.10.07BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-11 14.57.50 The Spring sap rising and new bulbs has revitalized my creative juices as well and I have just made 6 delightful tiny cushions to celebrate the imminent arrival of Spring!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-21 23.40.53BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 14.53.46 We have also been very busy in the garden: Pruning buddleias;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-02 12.17.20BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 11.29.28 Thinning Peony Poppy Seed, though we have a way to go! We must have had a 100 percent strike rate! The crates in the background of the first photo below will form a new compost heap in the same position;BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-14 10.49.23

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A mammoth task ahead!

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Getting ruthless!

BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 17.54.35Weeding the Soho Bed; Here are before and after shots!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.31.19BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.12.10 And planting new vegies, as well as making long wire guards to protect them from the ravages of the bowerbirds! Little did they realize about the treasures beneath the soil!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 17.58.51BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-08 11.43.51 The Crimson Rosellas have also been enjoying the Soho Bed and the lawn.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 14.57.18BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 14.58.16BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 14.56.50BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 14.58.37BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.54.45BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.51.05 A very tame pair of Grey Thrush have taken up residence in the garden, delighting us with their friendliness, inquisitive nature and beautiful melodic song!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.27.07BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.46.54BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.44.40BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.45.48BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.58.13BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.49.08 They seem to have struck a deal with the resident blackbirds, sharing the sundial and birdbath.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.42.53BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.47.40BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.47.53 Other visitors to the bird bath include a Willy Wagtail and a Lewin Honeyeater.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-20 18.08.58BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-20 18.09.06BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.42.28A large mixed flock of silvereyes and fairy wrens have been doing laps of the garden, investigating all the new leaf and gobbling up any insects they can find!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.25.34BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.25.06We have also had King Parrots and even Carrier Pidgeons! Perhaps they were delivering the message of Spring! I’m looking forward to more concrete evidence in September!!!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.15.43BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 18.16.27BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-12 17.11.08

Ben Boyd National Park : Part 2 : Photo Essay

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Last week, I finished with a brief description of the Light-to-Light walk and while we have still to do the whole walk over 3 days, we have visited all the spots we can access by car, so I thought a photo essay with a few brief notes about each spot would give you an idea of this magical spot! The photo below is of the National Park board of the northern and middle section of the park:BlogBenBoydNP75%ReszdIMG_2423Northern End : Pambula River and Bar Beach

Pambula River mouth, extending up the river;

National Parks and Wildlife lookout;

Walking trail up the side of the river and an amazing swing !;

Interesting rock formations and lots of quartz veining;

Popular with daytrippers, holiday makers, artists and fishermen.

Always lorikeets in the trees beside the picnic area.

Bird hide and walks at Panboola Wetland Conservation Area, Pambula.

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Start of the walk up the river

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Panboola, Pambula

Middle Section :

Severs Beach

500m walk through old farming property to a beach and massive 4000 year old aboriginal middens near the mouth of Pambula Lake, 1km inland up the Pambula River;

Shifting sandbars, so the river landscape is constantly changing.BlogBenBoydNP50%ReszdIMG_2457BlogBenBoydNP50%ReszdIMG_2458BlogBenBoydNP50%ReszdIMG_2462BlogBenBoydNP50%ReszdIMG_2469BlogBenBoydNP50%ReszdIMG_2468BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2016-06-26 18.52.41Barmouth Beach

Can be accessed by road through tall open coastal forest or a track from Haycock Point.

Sheltered north- facing beach, overlooking Pambula River mouth and beach.

George Bass, who was in an open whale boat with 6 crew members, sheltered from a gale here in 1797. He named the river ‘Barmouth Creek’, after the large sandbars at the mouth of the river, but it is now known as ‘Pambula River’.

Beach is protected by a tall headland on the ocean side.

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Pambula River Mouth from the northern side of river; Barmouth Beach far right across river
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Barmouth Beach across Pambula River from Bar Beach

BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2016-06-26 17.58.14OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2016-06-26 18.20.45Haycock Point and Haycock Beach (North Long Beach)

Ten minute walk through old farmland with regenerating coastal wattle and the odd feral lily to Haystack Rock and purple red rock platforms and rock pools.

Ocean beach is 3 km long and can also be accessed via the North Long Beach road (Red Bloodwoods and Banksia forest).

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Long Beach, Haycocks Point looking south
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Cliffline Haycocks Point

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Northern end Long Beach, Haycocks Point
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Rock platforms at northern end Long Beach, Haycocks Point looking north to Haystack Rock
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Haycocks Point
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Haystack Rock, Haycocks Point

BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2016-06-26 17.15.06Long Beach and Quandolo Point

Wide isolated 1km long beach with colourful rock ledges.

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Looking north from Quondolo Beach to Long Beach and Haycocks Point
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Quandolo Beach
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Quandolo Point looking north
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Quondolo Point, looking south to Terrace Beach and Lennards Island
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Lennards Island from Quondolo Point
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Red rock platforms, Quondolo Point
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Quondolo Point

The Pinnacles

Also known as the Quoraburagun Pinnacles.

Eroded gully at northern end of Pinnacles Beach with colourful rock layers of sand, clay and sediment.

White pipe clay used by local aborigines for white ochre, an important trade commodity.

Feral pine trees.

Pinnacles Beach is 3km long and leads into Terrace Beach at the southern end.

Thick coastal scrub and steep colourful cliffs.

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Track through heath land, The Pinnacles
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Pinnacle Beach heading south to Terrace Beach and Lennards Island
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The Pinnacles are still actively eroding
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Lennards Island from the Pinnacles
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Feral pines at the Pinnacles
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Pinnacles Beach from Terrace Beach Car Park, looking north

The Terraces

One of our favourite spots. We spent New Years Day 2016 here and there were only four other people.

It is fun exploring the rocks at the end, and if you walk the other way, you will reach the Pinnacles.

The Terraces, Lennards Island and North Point are all accessed by the road to the Eden Tip, off the main highway.BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-12-28 14.29.20BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-09-25 14.03.01BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-09-25 14.24.20BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-09-25 14.25.03BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-12-28 14.58.40BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-12-28 15.08.29BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-12-28 15.48.29

Lennards Island

Can be accessed at low tide, but becomes an island at high tide.

We saw an a echidna on the beach and a pair of peregrine falcons last time we were here.

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Lennards Island from the Pinnacles
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Lennards Island from Quondolo Point

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Lennards Island

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Lennards Island
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Lennards Island

North Head (Warong Point)

My daughter loves this place for its wonderful geology and myriad of small shells.BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-12-28 16.57.17

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North Head from Aslings Beach, Eden
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Fisherman on rock platform, North Head
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Heavily folded layers, North Head

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Sleeping Dragon, North Head
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Hidden beach, North Head
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Narrow ridge to south of beach, North Head

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Rocks to north of hidden beach
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North Head
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View south from North Head towards Asling Beach in background

North Point looks across to Aslings Beach and the town of Eden, which separate the middle and lower sections of Ben Boyd National Park, so, even though they are not National Park, I have added a few photos in.

Aslings Beach (2km long)

Stretching round Calle Calle Bay and enclosing Curalo Lagoon and the main surf beach for Eden. Large sea pool at southern end. One day, we saw a dolphin pod catching the waves in.

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Aslings Beach looking north with North Head in background
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Aslings Beach looking south to Eden and Middle Head
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Northern end of Aslings Beach- note entrance to Curalo Lagoon on far left of photo

Eden

Home of the Killer Whale Museum (http://killerwhalemuseum.com.au/) and the Sapphire Coast Marine Discovery Centre (http://www.sapphirecoastdiscovery.com.au/).

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Middle Head, Eden from North Head
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View from Rotary Lookout, Middle Head over Twofold Bay, Red Point and Boyds Tower

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Rotary Lookout, Middle Head, Eden
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Rotary Park, Middle Head and Eden township from Boyds Tower
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Wharf, Eden

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Navy vessel, Twofold Bay

Southern End:

Quarantine Bay

Not in National Park, but worth a visit en route; Just south of Eden and Rixon’s Beach.

Lots of pelicans, seagulls, rays and even a friendly seal;

Boat launching ramp and fish cleaning tables.

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Rixons Beach, looking north to Eden and wharf
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Quarantine Bay
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Quarantine Bay with Mt Imlay in background

Boydtown Beach– 2km long- adjacent to site of Boydtown and historic Seahorse Inn.

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Boydtown Beach, looking north
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Seahorse Inn, Boydtown

Here is a National Parks map of the southern end of Ben Boyd National Park, encompassing the Light-to-Light Walk from Boyds Tower to Green Cape Light Station:BlogBenBoydNP40%ReszdIMG_5595Whale Beach and Davidson Whaling Station

Long isolated 2 km long beach protecting mouth of Towamba River and Kiah Inlet.

Once the site for onshore whaling operations at historic Davidson Whaling Station on Brierley Point.

This is a photo of an information board at the Killer Whale Museum.BlogBenBoydNP25%Reszd2015-05-15 11.17.08BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-03-31 10.36.42BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-03-31 11.20.31

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Large midden on the headland

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See post last week on Ben Boyd National Park for its history.BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5607BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5609BlogBenBoydNP75%ReszdIMG_5615BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5618BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5617Leatherjacket Bay

Isolated rock and pebble beach;

Granite boulders covered in bright orange lichen.BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5682BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5683BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5685BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5687BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5689

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Leatherjacket Bay
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Leatherjacket Bay

Saltwater Creek

500 m long beach bordered by 2 creeks and small lagoons

A lovely spot with an estuarine lagoons with reeds and rushes, melaleuca thickets, forest (rough barked apple and old-growth tall trees, full of hollows) and coastal foredunes, providing a variety of habitats for native flora and fauna and a veritable feast for the local aborigines, as evidenced by their middens.BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5768BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5781BlogBenBoydNP20%ReszdIMG_5785

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Southern end of Saltwater Creek
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Southern end Saltwater Creek

Hegarty’s Bay

Shrubby heath provides a habitat for the Ground Parrot, Pezoporus wallicus. We have yet to visit this bay, as it can only be accessed on the walk.

Bittangabee Bay

Aboriginal middens;

Old ruins of the Imlay’s ‘Bittangabee House’. The Imlays based their whaling operations here. Boats launched from Bittangabee Bay and Mowarra Point could attack northward migrating whales before the crews at Twofold Bay, giving the Imlays a commercial advantage. However, with their financial demise, the Imlays had to cancel the work on the house, and in 1848, Boyd took over the site on their departure.

Shed used to store supplies for Green Cape Light Station from 1880-1927. There was a horse-drawn tramway to the light station, 7km away.

The rocks provide homes for with limpets, chitons, snails, crabs and seaweeds. Sand Hoppers and Weedy Sea Dragons, Phyllopteryx taenolatus, live in the kelp beds.

Small white sand beach, backed by thick eucalypt forest.

Healthy Superb Lyrebird population.BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-03-31 13.33.50BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-03-31 13.35.01

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Bittangabee Bay with old storehouse ruins
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Swamp Wallaby, Bittangabee Bay
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Bittangabee Beach
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Storehouse ruins Bittangabee Bay

Pulpit Rock

Land-based game fishing, as it is very close to the continental shelf.

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Pulpit Rock
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Pulpit Rock
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Pulpit Rock

Green Cape

Deep water immediately offshore and sheltered sites in most wind conditions, making this a popular site for snorkelling and scuba diving.

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Looking towards Green Cape from Bay Cliff
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From the rock platform at light house, looking north to Lennards Island
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Rock platform at the end of Green Cape

Disaster Bay

From the road to Green Cape, there is a spectacular view over Disaster Bay, so named because Matthew Flinders lost 8 sailors, when they went ashore for water and were killed by aborigines in 1802. Nine ships were also lost in the area between 1862 and 1917.

Disaster Bay is a cove between Bay Cliff and Green Cape. Bay Cliff is a 350 Million year old rock formed by waves and it was an island 10,000 years ago. Since then, ocean currents have deposited sand to form parallel dunes and beaches.

Wonboyn River flows into Disaster Bay, just north of Bay Cliff.

Both are accessed by a road from the highway, further south of Ben Boyd National Park, and it is well worth spending a whole day there. It is one of the most stunningly scenic spots I have ever seen and warrants its own post later on in the year!BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-03-31 15.07.55BlogBenBoydNP20%Reszd2015-03-31 15.08.02