Rose Websites

A shorter post this week with plenty of information for you to chase up and digest! These are my favourite rose websites!

  1. Heritage Roses in Australia Inc.    http://www.heritage.rose.org.au/

This is the Number 1 website for Australian Old Rose growers! Formed in 1979 for lovers and collectors of Old Roses, its aim is to preserve, cultivate, distribute and study Old Roses, including roses no longer in general cultivation, roses of historical importance, and species roses and their hybrids. There was also a particular interest in finding and conserving Australian bred roses, for example those of Alister Clark, Frank Riethmuller and Mrs Fitzhardinge.

There are regional groups in New South Wales (Blue Mountains, Illawarra-Southern Highlands, Orange-Central Tablelands, Sydney, Riverina), Queensland (Brisbane, Darling Downs), Tasmania (Northern Region, Southern Region), South Australia (Adelaide, Barossa & Beyond), ACT (Canberra), Victoria (Goldfields and Beyond, Greater Melbourne, Mornington Peninsula, State Rose Garden, Western Districts) and Western Australia (Perth, Great Southern, South West).

The website includes tabs for :

News and Events around the world and in Australia;

Membership : Benefits include garden visits and lectures by renowned speakers about Old Roses and their visits to Old Rose gardens around the world and attendance of national (every two years) and international conferences;

Quarterly Journal: Informative and interesting articles from renowned experts, details of coming events and regional reports;

Articles: Index and Gallery of roses; Rose breeding/ propagation/ pruning; History of Rose: General/ Australian breeders: Alister Clark; and Videos.

Links Page: http://www.heritage.rose.org.au/links : particularly useful for more rose websites.

  1. National Rose Society of Australia      http://www.rose.org.au/

Another important website for Australian rose growers, though it encompasses modern roses as well.

This national body was formed in 1972 with representatives from all the state societies. It is also a member of the World Federation of Rose Societies. Its aim is to encourage, improve and increase the cultivation of the rose in Australia by means of exhibitions, publications and the co-ordination of all State Rose Societies.

Each state society has its own website, each of which is quite comprehensive with details of shows and meetings; articles on rose care, choice, breeding and pruning; a rose care calendar, videos and publications and a query forum; a list of public rose gardens and rose growers and suppliers and most importantly, more links to reference sites; other rose and garden societies; gardens to visit and vendors’ web sites. Here are the links to the state societies:

Victoria:  http://www.rosesocietyvic.org.au/

NSW: http://www.nsw.rose.org.au/

SA:  http://sarose.org.au/

WA:  http://www.wa.rose.org.au/

QLD: http://www.qld.rose.org.au/

There is also information about the latest rose conventions around the world. For example, the 18th  World Rose Convention: A Fairytale of Roses : to be held in Copenhagen, Denmark from 28 June to 4 July in 2018 : http://www.wrc2018.dk/.

The above website also has as a list of Australian Bred Roses: http://www.rose.org.au/ausroses.html. In fact, if these are your particular interest, there is also a specific site for Australian Bred roses:

  1. Australian Rose Breeders’ Association Inc : http://www.arba.rose.org.au/. It includes articles on Australian roses and their breeders; hybridizing and propagating roses and more links : http://www.arba.rose.org.au/links.html.
  1. World Federation of Rose Societies http://www.worldrose.org/.

The umbrella organization for all the rose societies of the world, this site includes a Heritage Rose Newsletter and a Rose Conservation Data Base and all the news and events from around the world. They also have a world rose directory : http://www.worldrose.org/rosedirectory/directory.asp

  1. Heritage Rose New Zealand Inc http://www.heritageroses.org.nz/

Well worth looking at for Australian growers, as New Zealand is part of our region and grows beautiful roses. Features include: a Rose Register and lists of fragrant Old Roses; gardens to visit in New Zealand; and local rose suppliers and growers, not to mention some great recipes for rose water and rose vinegar (See: http://www.heritageroses.org.nz/pdfs/RoseWater.pdf) ; rose petal yoghurt and rose petal sugar and rose hip syrup, which I have yet to try! I remember making rosehip jelly as a teenager and removing all the irritating hairy seeds from the small dog rose hips was a very time-consuming job, as the tiny amount of remaining flesh necessitated the use of a huge number of hips! Heritage Rose New Zealand also produce a rather luscious-looking quarterly journal!

6. There is also another website called The Rose Garden on New Zealand Roses Online in NZ : http://www.netlist.co.nz/Gardens/rosegarden/, which is worth investigating. It has articles on the different rose groups; photos of roses and rose gardens and links to other websites, mail order suppliers and special garden events.

7.The American Rose Society : http://www.ars.org/ is the equivalent of the National Rose Society of Australia and is worth consulting for its resources : http://www.rose.org/resources/.

8. Heritage Rose Foundation :  http://www.heritagerosefoundation.org/ is an American organization, established in 1986, for the preservation of Old Roses, as well as ongoing research and education. They have a monthly newsletter, as well as a biannual journal Rosa Mundi, which has some wonderful articles on Old Roses and gardens. For example: La Bonne Maison : http://media.wix.com/ugd/e6654e_3e8ede54ba3df1d99c601b1e9032417b.pdf and The Roses of the Ardennes Region in France: http://media.wix.com/ugd/e6654e_61393f7cd851087d3baedc0e917a40ec.pdf.

9. Roses Anciennes en Francehttp://www.rosesanciennesenfrance.org/ is the French equivalent, but does require a fluid grasp of written French! It is a very active group with lots of activities, articles and photo galleries and links to French rose gardens, associations and suppliers like : Pépinières Les Rosiers des Merles : http://www.roseraie-de-berty.com, Roses Anciennes André Eve : http://www.roses-anciennes-eve.com and the Loubert Rose Garden : http://www.rosesloubert.com/ . Note that Roses Loubert does sell these roses at : http://www.pepiniere-rosesloubert.com/.

Rose Anciennes en France also has an English version of The History of the Rose in Lyon : http://www.rosesanciennesenfrance.org/en/history_of_the_rose.htm.

10. Another French organization devoted to Old Roses is Rosa Gallica: http://www.rosagallica.org , and while mainly written in French, it includes an English newsletter for its foreign English-speaking members: http://www.rosagallica.org/page11/page11.html.html.

11. England has the Royal National Rose Society : http://www.rnrs.org.uk. Established in 1876, it is the world’s oldest specialist plant society. It is best known for its flagship Gardens of the Rose at Chiswell Green in Hertfordshire, on the outskirts of St Albans: http://www.rnrs.org.uk/visit-us/.

12. Rogers Roses : http://www.rogersroses.com/ is the website written by Roger Philips and Martyn Rix, British authors of two books in my rose library, which I discussed early in the month: ‘The Quest for the Rose’ and  ‘The Rose’, part of their Garden Series, which also includes a host of books on other garden plants. The website features almost 5,000 varieties of roses and around 6,000 photos, providing a perfect reference for rose identification. There are also details of the nurseries around the world stocking particular rose varieties.

13. Help Me Find : http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/index.php is also a very useful site, not just for roses, but clematis and peonies as well. Their catalogue includes over 44,000 roses and has more than 160,000 photos, along with thousands of rose nurseries, public and private gardens, rose societies, authors, breeders, hybridizers and publications from all over the world. They also have a huge number of links covering anatomy, care, pests and diseases, hardiness, rose trials, species roses and a category titled: ‘Other’, which encompasses so much, I will leave it to you to explore at your leisure!

14. For dreamy reflections on roses, I cannot go past Rose Gathering : http://www.rosegathering.com/ , which is a delightful site with articles on all the rose classes, as well as on the symbolism of the rose; recommendations about books on roses, general gardening, specific plants and rarer books like the Wilhelm Keller rare rose catalogues of 1828, 1829 and 1833. There is also a list of artworks featuring roses, including postage stamps, and a list of rose societies and references to specific rose gardens. The Links section is also enormous and well worth exploring! See: http://www.rosegathering.com/links.html.

15. Paul Barden has written a website called Old Garden Roses and Beyond : http://paulbardenroses.com/main.html. It is devoted to Old Roses of the 19th Century and before, but also discusses the best modern roses of the 20th and 21st Centuries, as well as David Austin’s English Roses. He also provides lots of information about the growing, pruning, propagating and breeding of the rose, as well as another large resource section. A breeder and rose hybridizer himself, Paul also writes a blog called A Hybridizer’s Journal : http://paulbarden.blogspot.com.au/.

16. The Antique Rose Emporium is a name, which often comes up in the links : https://www.antiqueroseemporium.com/. It is an American mail order rose company, with a lovely mail order catalogue.

17. Botanical.com: A Modern Herbal , written by Mrs M Grieve (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/r/roses-18.html) has plenty of information about rose history, rose types and the uses of roses throughout the world in medicine and cooking. She includes recipes for potpourri, crystallized roses and even rose petal sandwiches!

18. Brent C Dickerson has written a number of articles on Old Roses : http://web.csulb.edu/~odinthor/oldrose.html.

19. There are also many websites written by rose specialists:

Peter Boyd is an expert on Scots and other Pimpinellifolia roses : http://www.peterboyd.com/scotsroses.htm.

Jerry Haynes has an article on Tea Roses : http://www.rose.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/History-of-Roses-Tea-Roses.pdf.

20. And finally, there are the countless rose nursery websites. For example: Peter Beales: https://www.classicroses.co.uk/ and David Austin : https://www.davidaustinroses.com/.

Happy Reading !!!

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