The Summer Garden

In order to avoid endless repetition and also because I have so much to say about Old Roses (both types and gardens), not to mention my favourite books, I am only posting four seasonal posts of our garden this year and each will be at the end of the three-month period. So here is our 2017 Summer Garden , but because I wrote a post on the December Garden last year, this first seasonal post will only cover two months from January to February 2017.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-07-12-51-58Once Summer finally arrived, being very late to start this season, the temperatures really warmed up, especially in the month of January with some temperatures in the late 30s and early 40s! Unfortunately, we were away most of January with a brief reconnoitre in mid-January, but a dear friend did our watering for us and kept our poor plants alive, while her daughter played with her ducks in the shade of the trees!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0820blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0810This did not however prevent a lot of the foliage and new growth being singed to a crisp and when we finally returned home for good, the garden was very blowsy and overgrown, my youngest daughter’s dream garden and mine too to a certain extent, although I still like a little sense of order and the very next day, we were out weeding, pruning back dead and dying stems and leaves and watering like mad! Here are some photos of the Soho Bed before…blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0786blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1010blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-20-04and after…blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-20-38blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-25-17blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-28-47blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-24-11We badly needed rain- most of the grass on the roadsides in Candelo was super-dry, crackly and bleached, but we  purposefully kept our front lawn green, despite the increased cost of watering, to keep our spirits up and make us feel cool on these long hot days! Even the birds were feeling the heat! Compare the lawn in the first two photos!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-17-14-49-36blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1126blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-03-16-15-28blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1001The Acanthus mollis were one of the greatest casualties of the long dry and searing heat, though their dried stalks would still look great as a dried flower arrangement and the green seeds are very attractive against the brown stems.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-18-36 The hosta and the black currant suffered burnt leaves as well and the dogwood, rhododendrons and camellias under the trees, the hydrangeas and even the protea and feral morning glory, were wilting badly with the heat.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-25-34blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-27-12Despite the dry, we still had roses blooming!

In the Moon Bed: William Morris (1st two photos) and Heritage (3rd and 4th photo), nestled in amongst flowering salvia, Indigo Spires;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-17-14-51-55blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-24-35blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0455blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0320 and Jude the Obscure;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-34-41blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1012 In the Soho Bed, The Childrens’ Rose;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0814 blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-06-19-06-36and Eglantyne;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-15-31-48blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-06-19-06-47blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0233LD Braithwaite and Mr Lincoln; blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0232blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1139and finally, Icegirl (1st 2 photos) and Lady X.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0316blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0235blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0251On the main pergola, Adam;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-15-19-49-54blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1065 and Souvenir de la Malmaison;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1150 and on the future single entrance arch: Alister Stella Grey.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-35-47 In the Moon Bed, Golden Celebration;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0325blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-17-14-51-15blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0323 and the Soho Bed, Our Copper Queen and Just Joey.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0817blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0404 On the front wall of the house, Lamarque;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0990 and Mrs Herbert Stevens;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-17-47 In the vegetable garden hedges, Penelope;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0813Stanwell Perpetual;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-29-55 and Sombreuil. blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0345And finally, the sumptuous hips of rugosa, Frau Dagmar Hastrup.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0999blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1000 Flowering Salvias are in their element in the heat. I have 5 different types: the deep blue Indigo Spires and a light sky blue salvia, which I grew from a cutting from my sister’s garden, both intermingled in the Moon Bed and a perfect contrast to the pink roses of  William Morris and Heritage.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-16-57Both salvias are very popular with a metallic dark blue parasitic Neon Cuckoo Bee, Thyreus nitidulis (see photos 1 & 2) and the Blue-Banded Bee, Amegilla cingulata (photo 3). Apparently, the Cuckoo Bee lays its eggs in the nests of Blue-Banded Bees. See: http://www.aussiebee.com.au/thyreus.html.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-26-39blogsummer-gardenreszd30%2017-01-14-12-26-39-copy-copyblogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-25-48I later discovered some red-and-black striped harlequin bug nymphs, Dindymus versicolor, on the bright blue salvia and dead sunflower heads, though I am really not sure about them being on my roses!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-18-49blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-13-43blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0422blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0395I also have a red salvia (1st photo), a magenta salvia (3rd photo) and a two-toned variety (pink and white) called Lipstick, also grown from a cutting (2nd photo).blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0327blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0418blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-15-32-01 On our return, I also discovered that I had planted one cutting in the WRONG place- it had grown to a ginormous size in our absence and was obviously a cutting of the Tree Salvia. It will definitely have to go, as it is swamping my David Austin roses in the Moon Bed, but I want to see the colour of its flower first before I remove it, as I took cuttings of two different tree salvias- one pink and one lemon. It is probably too big to transplant, but I will take another cutting, then plant its seedling on the back border of the garden, though I am badly running out of space!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-19-49blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-20-02 The Moon Bed looked so much more civilized after weeding, though I must admit the fine bamboo mulch did an excellent job at keeping most of the weeds at bay! I also got the giant salvia under a little control to give my roses a chance!!!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-17-45blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-17-50On our return trip home, we called into my sister’s new garden at ‘Glenrock’, where we took more cuttings, which I know will do well here, as her garden is even colder and frostier than we are, reaching Winter minimums of minus 10 degrees Celsius! I will definitely find room for them!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0612And I have enjoyed making blowsy romantic bouquets with the roses and salvias, now that we are home! The 2nd photo is my vase for St. Valentines Day, which accompanied….blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1153blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0855 a delicious carrot cake, decorated with rose petals! Thank you, Kirsten, for your artistic input!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0891blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0894blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0896Zinnias also love the heat! I love the bright colours of my zinnia bed between the dahlias and the sunflower!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0789blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0347blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-22-56blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0458 They are such generous flowers and are obviously excellent self-seeders, as all the zinnias in my new patch were spontaneous seedlings from last year’s old patch in the cutting garden and there are more in the vegie patch and the Moon Bed as well. Their only defect in my eyes is their lack of scent!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0332blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-23-22blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-23-29blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-34-12blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0339blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-01-21-06-19blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0462blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-16-13-36-39blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0998blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0337blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0335blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-15-30-41 blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0460It doesn’t seem to worry the bees and the butterflies though!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0028blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1046Zinnias are fabulous flowers for bright cheery arrangements! I have been cutting bouquets all month, including one for this beautiful old vase, which I recently found (2nd photo).blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0356blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-11-23-45blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0361 The dahlias are also wonderful for bouquets…!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0237blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0240Unfortunately, the late frost when the dahlias were just resurfacing in late Spring finished off the scarlet dahlia on the corner of the vegetable patch, but bright orange Meadow Lea has performed very well again this year and the mixed dahlia patch recovered brilliantly, providing plentiful nectar for exhausted, battle-scarred butterflies!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-21-57blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-16-13-37-51The Cutting Garden also had a big cleanup after its rampant romp while we were away!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-07-12-52-09The wild dandelions in the lawn were the next victims in our sights, even though they look so sunny and pretty!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-07-11-54-27blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-07-11-54-47Agapanthus and Hydrangeas are essential components of the Summer garden, their cooling blues contrasting dramatically with the fiery red of the Monbretia flowers.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-17-14-50-02blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-17-14-52-51blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1015blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1018blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1022blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0988I particularly loved the varying colours of the hydrangeas this year, with lots of green and graduated blues.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-05-11-19-33blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0287blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1051blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0367 Ceratostigma, Convovulus maritima and the Rosalie Geranium also provide touches of blue in the garden,blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-19-15blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1070 while the cigar plant and this unidentified seedling (another cutting) lend purple hints.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1067blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1057 The thyme surrounding the sundial in the Soho Bed is in full flower.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1149blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1148I was very excited to see the green bells of my one and only Molucella (Bells of Ireland) seedling (from sown seed).blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1144 I love the dusky pink bells of the correa on the terrace and the red bottlebrush blooms at the bottom of the garden,blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0266blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-09-18blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-09-41blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-01-21-08-58 as well as the deep red blooms of my potted ivy leaf geranium, a reminder of our rose trip to Clare, South Australia, in October 2014.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-18-42The feverfew recovered brilliantly from its transplanting in the cutting garden, then positively romped ahead, blooming profusely with its pretty white daisy-like flowers.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0811 Caroline’s chamomile flowers are very similar in appearance. I have separated all the tiny plants and planted them in front of the Tea plant and the Native Frangipani over our old dog Scamp’s grave. They could have a battle with the couch, but if successful, will form a lovely patch to sit on while we commune with Scamp and drink tea – Chamomile Tea of course!!!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-05-11-22-42blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-21-19blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-13-21-25 My Dianthus ‘Doris‘ and ‘Coconut Ice’ are reblooming and even the Philadelphus virginalis got a bit confused with the later Summer, throwing out a late bloom mid January!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-30-09blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-18-03blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1016 We planted Autumn crocus bulbs, given to us by my sister, under our quince tree and the first two have already bloomed!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1048blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-13-10-54-59blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0398My lemonade tree was also in flower over that period and we now have lemonade fruits developing nicely, as well as a large number of Tahitian limes, one Navel orange and one Lisbon lemon, our first crop for all trees!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-34-56blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-21-57blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-20-51blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-05-11-23-17blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-05-11-20-04I think we will be getting a bumper crop of cumquats again this season! The scent in the air from the cumquat blossom is intoxicating!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0399blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0400Fortunately, I don’t think fruit bats like citrus (though Ross’s favourite orange stink bugs do!), as a small colony has decided to extend their holiday in the trees across the creek. Because we were away, we never got to taste our plums this year, though I suspect the fruit bats did (!), but we were the lucky recipients of this box of home-grown peaches, given to us by our lovely watering angel!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1075blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1073blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-11-58-33 It appears that this year, we are going to have a really good fig season too- hopefully they will ripen before the onset of Winter and the bats don’t get them first! Maybe this is why they are still hanging round (literally!) !!!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0274I’m uncertain as to whether flying foxes don’t eat Golden Hornet crab apples either, but maybe they haven’t discovered them yet!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0017blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-17-14-50-26blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0805 We have even had our first fruit on our Camellia sinensis (Tea) plant!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0804We have also been enjoying fresh salads from the garden, lettuce (now bolting!), spicy rocket and delicious warm cherry tomatoes, all picked straight from the garden just before eating!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0798blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-09-10-25-22 We have been particularly impressed with the golden cherry tomatoes, which self-seeded from a single bush last year. They are so pretty in the salads! I love the red ones too!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0799 blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0899blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0249We also feasted on bruschetta, made from our own freshly-picked tomatoes and rocket on our own home-made bread, still warm from the oven!blogsummer-gardenreszd25%2017-02-15-13-11-36 I’m not sure whether we will actually get many pumpkins this season, but at least the insects are enjoying the flowers! This year’s crop is obviously not as thuggish as their parents last year, although they are still attempting to take over the new compost bays!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0326blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0344blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0343They are making a late run for their money! Most of the pumpkins are tiny, though we did discover this larger beauty, skulking by the tree dahlia under lots of large leaves!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0414blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0418And Ross’s beans have also come to the party, their long purple pods contrasting with the bright orange self-seeded zinnias below. These delicious purple beans are quite magical, as they turn green on cooking!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-27-25blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-26-28blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0794blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1004 Though we did wonder why their leaves were so ratty and denuded at the top! A female Satin Bowerbird was the culprit!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0386blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0377By the end of Summer, Ross felt he had the garden under control to some extent and had even dug and started edging the vegetable gardens with old wooden fence palings and pruned the raspberry canes, which had finished fruiting, though our gardening helper still manages to find the odd ripe one!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1167blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1169blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0396blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0411blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0428blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0419blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0042Fortunately, the feral Duranta, which suffered so badly during the worst of the Summer heat, has now recovered with fresh green leaf, flowers and new berries for the birds (compare the first two photos before and after the rain – the brown shrub in the background of the 1st photo is the Duranta!) In the 3rd photo, the Duranta is the 2nd shrub back on the left side,blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-20-00blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0279blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0300blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0269though our resident Grey Fantail still likes to keep an eye on the progress in the vegetable patch!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0792Other visitors to the garden include a Yellow Thornbill in the pepperina tree;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0868a female Koel or Storm-Bird;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0581A pair of jet-black Ravens;blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0474and a female and immature male King Parrot.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0600blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0597The big news of Summer is the development of the White-Faced Heron chicks. If you remember, last December, we watched the parents build a very flimsy platform of twigs and sticks, high in the Cottonwood Poplar.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-24-09blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-11-47-15Our verandah is an excellent vantage point to watch the herons through binoculars and I was able to take some good photographs of the babies, once I attached my camera to a tripod.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-01-24blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-02-27Even though the chicks are very well-camouflaged and hidden behind the leaves, once you have worked out your landmarks (the twig wreath in the photo below) to accurately pinpoint the birds with the lens, it was possible to get a few shots.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-13-42-09-1 I suspect there may have initially been three chicks, as this photo suggests.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-02-58 However, by the time we arrived home, there were only two surviving chicks and they had grown enormously!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0588BlogSummer GardenReszd20%IMG_0533.jpgblogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-13-01-01blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-12-24-14 We enjoyed watching them sit high above the nest and learn balancing skills, though they were still a bit wobbly. They started jumping from branch to branch,blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-12-21-19BlogSummer GardenReszd20%2017-02-09 17.40.31.jpgand quickly mastered their grooming techniques,blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-12-41-01blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-12-40-05 their fluffy undersides giving away the fact that they were still babies!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-13-09-37blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-13-13-52Another difference between babies and their parents is that the adults have white faces.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0422blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0429I really hoped we would get to see the chicks’ first flight. It’s always such a miraculous moment and such a leap of faith! Maybe the sight of these more experienced aviators was helpful- a large flock of Little Corellas, which returned briefly in mid January to wheel and dive in the blue blue Summer skies of Candelo!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1041blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1043blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1031Or maybe, it was the flock of Gang-Gang Cockatoos, but we did achieve our desire!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0652 It was just so exciting! I think the first brave baby got the shock of its life, when it first ventured forth, flying straight back to the nest immediately! But as time went on (with the constant encouragement of their parents), they both gained confidence and were soon wheeling and diving with sheer joy!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0556blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1106 We were very happy to see them return to the tree each night, as well as during the day, for a rest and groom. They brought their teenage friends home, at least that’s what I assume, as none of them had white faces!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0902blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1015blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1018blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0944blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0931 Following the lead of their parents,blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1142blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1109 the chicks soon discovered the local rooftop next door.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0003blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0009 One day, the most confident chick flew into the top of the bamboo stand by the house, and then flew straight at me to land on the verandah roof!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0607blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0626The sight of these beautiful herons on our roof , their soft mushroom plumage complimenting the house colours so well (their yellow legs even matched the gutter colour!), with the rising morning moon in the background, gave me a sudden revelation with regards to our long-deliberated house name: ‘Herons’ Rise‘ – just perfect!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0712blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0687blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0695blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0717blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1136Here are some closeups, showing the complimentary colours!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0706blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0718blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0744 They also liked to feed in the gutter and even sat on the verandah edge.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0767blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0796blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1084blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1098 It’s a shame they don’t eat wasps, as this nest on the outside edge of the verandah is a little too close for comfort!!!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0261But I am glad they didn’t discover this praying mantis!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0365And then, by late February, they were gone! At least from our tree, though they did hang around in the local neighbourhood, fossicking down by the creek, flying in tandem over the local park and occasionally returning to the roof! I miss watching them watching us, but hopefully they will return to their old nest when it is time for them to rear their chicks!

And to top it all off, we finally we did get rain- blessed blessed rain! It’s not just the garden and we gardeners that are happy! These Sulphur-Crested Cockatoos were having a ball!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-16-12-08blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-05-11-24-22blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-05-11-24-13blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-16-14-14blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-16-13-51blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-16-12-30 We had 38 ml of rain over February, so we could still do with more, but at least it did freshen things up! Hopefully, we will get some more in March!

Already, the weather is starting to feel a bit like Autumn! I love this season, even though it is tempered with the knowledge of the approaching Winter! The buds on the camellia are already forming! Our Northern Hemisphere friends on the other hand are getting very excited about the end of their Winter and the beginning of Spring! One of the great things about blogging is that you have virtual friends all over the world and are always learning something new! One of the blogs I follow (https://chronicleofellen.wordpress.com/2017/01/31/fairy-doors-and-luck-magic/) mentioned ‘martenitsas‘, a term with which I was not familiar. On further research, I discovered that they are Bulgarian good luck charms, which are given to your nearest and dearest on the 1st March (Baba Marta Day) to welcome in the first day of Spring and wish them good health, happiness and longevity. They are then worn until the wearer sees their first stork or swallow returning from migration or a blossoming tree, so recipients in the Southern Hemisphere could be wearing them for six months!!! I was quite taken with the whole notion, even though we are entering Autumn, so followed the directions on a video tutorial (http://www.prettyprudent.com/2014/03/by-craft/yarn/martenitsa-bracelet-puppet-tutorial/), although I suspect the colours were muddled up, as traditionally, the male doll Pizho is white (representing purity), while the female doll Penda is red (the colour of life and passion), though really I don’t know if it really matters! I had so much fun making them and everyone seems to have loved them! So, Happy Baba Marta Day !!!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0448

The July Garden

A quiet month in the Winter garden, but still plenty of garden tasks from pruning roses to transplanting shrubs and sowing seed for the Spring. We have had quite a mild Winter, with fewer frosts, which are lighter than last year and clear sunny days, which invite you out to the garden away from the fire! It has been so mild that the little oak tree still has its leaves as I write! Here is a view from our front verandah on a typical July day this season.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-02 10.21.22BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-02 10.21.33BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.03.48 All the bulbs are also peeking their heads out, including the lost Delft Blue hyacinths and miniature Tête-a-Tête daffodils (see below) in the rockery bed with the grape hyacinth and the bluebells under the crab apple tree.BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0375BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-09 18.07.26 I have yet to find the fritillaries and the erythroniums, though I have a rough idea of where I planted them! The new tulips are growing madly- the little species tulip, Tulipa clusiana ‘Cynthia’ (foreground), is so different to its hybrid cousin, Bokassa Tulip Gold, behind it!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.10.35 The snowdrops, Galanthus, (1st photo) and snow flakes, Leucojum, (2nd photo) are flowering, though I am impatient to see them multiply and naturalize in the grass!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.33.32BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.28.45And my Dutch crocus (Crocus vernus ‘Remembrance’) are up! I was so excited to see my first splash of purple, as I had no idea where they were! They look so dramatic in front of the red camellia!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-22 14.50.17BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 17.07.59BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 17.07.54The hellebores are now starting to open their buds – in order, Helleborus x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’ (1st 2 photos); single form of Oriental Rose, H. orientalis; and my double forms of oriental roses, given to me for my birthday two years ago by my Mum. BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-07 12.48.03BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-09 13.45.50BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.41.10BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0373BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0374BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0332BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-24 10.48.14BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.34.23BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.31.40 The wallflowers and forget-me-nots love the Winter, providing a splash of colour in an otherwise grey and green Soho bed!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-27 17.56.08 The thyme is thriving around the sundial.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-13 12.51.49 The violets are a sea of purple under the maple tree and up the path.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-19 08.54.23BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 13.16.52 The pink violets are blooming less vociferously up the sweeping entrance path and are matched by the first pink flowers of the begonias further up the steps.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.05.49BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.39.22BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-19 08.59.53 The camellia continues to delight with its deep pink, pale pink and white blooms.BlogCamellias20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.17.09BlogCamellias20%Reszd2016-07-10 11.53.13BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.43.25BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.42.33The Red Riding Hood camellia is also in flower and really attracts the eye in the garden.BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0331BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-19 08.56.26 The sweet scent of the opening daphne flowers and Winter honeysuckle blooms make me glad to be alive every time I go out the back door!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-07 13.33.19BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.00.04BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-19 09.24.08BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-12 16.43.35BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-10 11.39.55 The latter is a perfect home for my gift bird feeder, though we are using to hold water for the little birds instead!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-12 16.43.46 The currawongs are dominating the bird bath at the moment, holding group seminars of up to 5 birds at a time! Huge flocks roost in our tree overnight.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-08 09.15.15BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 15.04.32BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 15.05.14BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 15.06.07BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 15.06.16BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 15.06.22 The little birds don’t stand a chance, but the currawongs don’t seem to worry the larger birds: the magpies, king parrots, crimson rosellas, galahs and female bowerbirds, all of which are revelling in the vegetable patch! Even the male bower bird has made a brief appearance to supervise proceedings (last 2 photos)!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 14.55.50BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-15 09.46.37BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-15 09.47.32BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-17 17.27.46BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-17 17.28.09BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0366BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-10 17.32.28BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0371BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0363BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0359

BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0347
The Broccoli Burglary!

BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-29 14.53.01BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0356

BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0350
The Godfather

They loved all the soil disruption, as Ross weeded and dug in manure around all the shrubs, ready for the new Spring growth.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-23 17.35.25Meanwhile, a pair of White-faced Herons had a long sunny grooming session in the branches overhead. They are such beautiful birds!BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0419BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0403BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0437 Ross has also been busy in the vegetable garden, with lots of weeding, hoeing and preparation work, but he has planted rainbow chard and shallots. The growth is all a bit slow at the moment, but we are enjoying the fresh organic broccoli heads!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 13.24.11BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-09 17.40.10 We finally harvested our first crop of cumquats for the season to make marmalade and splashed out on our first lemonade fruit! Only 2 kg cumquats for this first picking, but there is more unripe fruit on the tree.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 13.26.22BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 13.30.27BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-16 13.03.53BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-16 13.51.51BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-17 16.58.04 The loquats are also forming fruit and it looks like it will be a bumper crop!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.41.43 Ross also dug up all the tough, tenacious roots of the old Kiwi vines, which were resprouting and threatening to take all the nutrients from the new citrus trees. We pruned the David Austin bed, rather vigorously this first season to encourage a good bush shape, though will probably be more lenient in future years. Here are before and after photos of their haircuts!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-13 12.29.54BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-13 13.57.08 We turned another rose (York and Lancaster) on the shed fence, then planted out 3 Albertine roses, struck from cuttings, along the back wall of the shed.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-08 12.12.45BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-08 12.12.53 We also planted a Camellia sinensis, the tea plant (photos 3 and 4), next to the Native Frangipani (photo 2) in the corner of the flat, shading the grave of our old dog, Scamp. He always did enjoy a long chat and a cuddle over a cup of tea!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-10 11.51.29BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-27 17.44.33BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.38.53BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 13.28.35 The Lady X grevillea behind them is positively glowing at the moment!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-10 11.51.07 The chaenomeles are all coming into bloom back in the main garden and the transplanted shrubs are coming into fresh leaf. I love our flowering quince corner of white and ‘apple blossom’ (pink & white) varieties, in front of the white-pink blooms of our Star-above-Star camellia.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.32.00BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.33.14BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-22 14.50.42BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.32.58We have a red flowering quince on the bottom fence , still in bud.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 17.09.29We even have a few daisies in bloom – some sweet little paper daisies, Rhodanthe anthemoides (photo 1 and 2), the colour of their buds mirroring the blooms of the Coconut Sundae dianthus behind- serendipity at work! ; a single white marguerite daisy (photo 3); and a spoonbill osteospermum with its metallic blue centre (photo 4). BlogJulyGarden20%ReszdIMG_0439BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 13.35.23BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.29.10BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-09 18.08.22 The diosma (2nd photo) is also flowering, so we may have to wait a little before moving the tank plants. They compliment the fine mauve blooms of the westringia (1st photo) behind.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-24 10.44.41BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.31.09 We also transplanted the Linum from the egg cartons and sowed fresh seed (Linum on the left and Ladybird Poppies on the right) in the cutting garden beds.BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-09 18.04.31BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-09 17.59.49 Ross  sowed the peony poppy seeds, which has already come up in their thousands! See the fine rivers of green in the 2nd photo. Lots of seedling thinning ahead!!  I cannot wait for all the colourful Spring blooms!BlogJulyGarden30%Reszd2016-07-04 15.49.15BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-20 14.37.01 Having said that, I am impressed by the number of Winter flowers we have and the fact that we can still enjoy a few vases in the house. Even the last of the rosebuds pre-pruning were beautiful!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 10.23.23BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-14 10.22.52BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-06 17.32.37BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-06 17.33.14BlogCamellias20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.30.16BlogCamellias20%Reszd2016-07-16 12.24.16 We also planted a succulent in this lovely shell for the kitchen window sill.BlogJulyGarden30%Reszd2016-07-09 15.17.18To finish, here are some lovely sky photos from July! Snowy blustery clouds as a cold change comes through and the sun struggling to get up for the day! Must have been a bad case of Monday-itis!!! Till next month…!BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-06-28 19.05.02BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-15 09.48.09BlogJulyGarden20%Reszd2016-07-15 09.48.16

The June Garden

I don’t know if it was my imagination, but Winter seemed to start later this year with the Autumn leaves persisting into early June.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-04 10.16.23BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.15.51BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.16.22BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.17.14BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.21.14 Certainly, the frosts were later, the tree dahlias eventually succumbing to heavy winds rather than frosts this year!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-04 12.47.12BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-05 11.34.10 We had some wild and woolly weather in the first week of June with one quarter of our annual rainfall (247 mm) in 3 days. The gully and creek were in flood- the creek level rising high, with the fast-flowing current cutting hard into the bank and bringing down trees. The local coast also experienced enormous tides with cunjevoi and sea tulips ripped from their beds and washed up on the beach.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-03 15.13.46BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-03 15.13.36BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-03 15.15.17BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-03 15.15.32BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-03 15.16.48 We had so many puddles in the garden and Ross had to race out in the middle of it all to dig a trench around the cutting garden.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-04 12.51.23BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-04 10.16.29 By mid-June, the weather finally turned cold with some lovely sky effects.

BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-22 16.25.57
Rain over the ocean, taken from Chamberlain Lookout, Tathra

BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-22 16.29.53

BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-22 17.29.51
Dark clouds threaten to replenish Candelo Creek after the flood-waters subsided

BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-21 12.23.10 The Winter garden finally arrived, its palette predominantly white and purple with a few lemons and pinks thrown in! The violets are a mass in the maple bed and along the path.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.16.04BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-05-31 12.32.31BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-07 12.45.46BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-07 12.45.52 My rockery is full of bulbs poking their heads up, as well as divinely-scented lemon jonquils and white Coconut Ice dianthus, both demanding obeisance every time we walk past!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.51.22BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 15.05.18BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.51.36BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-05 11.32.13 I also love the fresh lemony smell of the tiny flowers of the Winter Honeysuckle, as we enter the back porch.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-11 15.10.29 Our daphne is in full bud, promising further fragrance as the Winter progresses.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.27.39 The wallflowers in the Soho bed (below) and stock in the cutting garden have a warm spicy scent.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.21.57 The bulbs have greatly multiplied under trees and in the cutting garden with tulips, iris, daffodils, freesias and ranunculas all growing madly.

BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.24.26
Erlicheer jonquils
BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.17.57
From back to front : Dutch Iris, Cornflowers and Daffodils
BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.17.03
The old tulips have multiplied
BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.16.33
New Bokassa Gold tulips

The jonquils and tiny snowdrops, Galanthus nivalis, are so pretty.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.20.13BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-13 16.57.41 I constantly look for new bulbs every day and it is always so exciting when I spot one emerging from the soil like this tiny bluebell under the crabapple tree.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.19.44 The hellebores are all in bud, ready to provide a splash of colour under the trees.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.22.12 I love the sweet diminutive forget-me-nots and the splash of gold of the Winter Jasmine, Jasminium nudiflorum, on the laneway.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.55.24BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-07 17.19.30 Here is a colourful black and gold ladybird from the bottom of the garden.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-22 14.00.15 I am really looking forward to seeing the japonica buds open.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-14 14.22.43 The camellia at the front door has already blessed us with a number of light pink and deep pink blooms.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 18.19.48BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 18.20.35BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-01 16.50.16BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 18.19.54BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.20.50 The new camellias are also in bud and Star-above-Star has had its first flower.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.18.22BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.22.34BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.22.50 The roses have still thrown out the odd bloom: Eglantyne (pink) and Golden Celebration (gold).BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-10 14.01.46BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-10 14.02.30 My birthday Souvenir de la Malmaison is already in new leaf.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.23.53 I cut the last blooms of the roses and frost-damaged hydrangeas for two final bouquets for the season.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 16.17.07BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 16.16.57BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.48.43 I pruned the hydrangeas and all the Soho Bed roses rather severely on the weekend.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 11.30.19BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.25.49BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.23.18BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 14.23.04BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 14.23.10We also turned and transplanted quite a few of the roses. Despite our careful observation of outer buds and planting for correct shape, my roses have a habit of sending their shoots out at 90 degrees to where I want them! Now that the roses are dormant, it is a good time to correct their positions- hence Lamarque was dug up after the heavy rains (a perfect time as the soil was so soft), turned 90 degrees and replanted, so that its long canes can diverge horizontally and create the desired fan shape up the house wall instead of  growing out from the wall as before.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.52.00 We did the same with Cornelia, so it arches it long canes to the left over the gateway to the chooks (we have yet to build a simple wooden single arch for it), instead of throwing them up into the apple tree to its right.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.20.25BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.20.34 We transplanted Aimee Vibert from its initial position as part of the cutting garden screen behind the Soho Bed to the other side of the arch to replace the dying Kathleen. We also turned Penelope, so it was a member of the hybrid musk hedge rather than the vegetable garden! See the new hedge-line in the photo below : From front to back : Penelope, Aimee Vibert and Cornelia.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-21 13.45.26 We made a decision to eliminate the screening hedge between the Soho Bed and cutting gardens. There really was not enough room for the hedge and path, the mature shrubs would have cast too much shade on the cutting garden and in the end, we concluded that we actually like seeing the cutting garden. So, we transplanted the white lilac to the corner of the cutting garden, the Philadelphus to the main pergola corner next to climbing Tea rose, Adam (photos 1 and 2), the Viburnum burkwoodii ‘Anne Russell’ to the camellia border (photo 5), the Exochorda between the purple-pink lilac and the pink-and-white Japonica (photo 4) and the Flowering Currant  to the front of the Snowball tree (photo 3). Its future pink Spring blooms will complement the pink Weigela on the other side of the pergola entrance.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.13.06BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.13.13BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.13.51BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.15.40BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.18.43 We finally moved the Alister Stella Grey rose to the shed corner to create a golden yellow arch with Rêve d’Or in front of the cumquats, lemonade and quince trees.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.14.49 We still have a number of potted roses, raised from last Winter’s cuttings, to transplant- a hedge of Russelliana on the fence behind the White Mulberry and an Albertine hedge along the back side wall of the shed, the old timber a perfect background for the warm pink blowsy blooms.

We are starting to feel like we are finally achieving a sense of control and structure in the garden. We plan to build a compost bay with 3 divisions against the fence behind the no-dig cutting garden (see the bamboo markers behind the garden fork). The seed dahlias are over-wintering in the front of the bed under their blanket of mulch. Ross has just redug the patch behind the dahlias prior to sowing last year’s peony poppy seed for Spring, to be succeeded by zinnias in Summer and Autumn. Both plantings should benefit from having their own area, as both are very tall and take up a lot of room. Behind the zinnias and poppies will be a strawberry patch, then a path in front of the compost bay. On the left end of the compost bay, we will create an asparagus bed and on the right end, we will grow angelica and rhubarb.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.21.57There are also self-seeded peony poppies sprouting in the Soho Bed and I have some Iceland poppies in egg cartons awaiting transplantation to the cutting garden.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-10 13.59.30 Other pending tasks are to construct the chook fence (and chook house) behind the hybrid musk hedges and transplant the natives in the old sandy septic tank, so we can transform it into a shallow rock-lined pond.  Ross has limed the vegie garden. The growth of the new vegies is a bit slow because of the cold and Winter shade.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.20.48BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-10 14.04.36 We have yet to prune the raspberries and harvest the cumquats for marmalade!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-10 14.05.56 Our first lemonade fruit is almost ripe!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-20 14.42.22 We are anticipating a huge crop of loquats this year, as it is still flowering!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-08 13.40.23 With all this time in the garden, we have enjoyed the company of lots of little birds from fairy wrens to brown and yellow thornbills, flycatchers, eastern spinebills and silvereyes.BlogJune Garden 25%Reszd2016-06-05 11.42.19BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-08 12.35.49BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 13.50.47BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 13.50.52BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 13.51.22BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 18.01.50BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 18.01.39BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 13.53.09BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 13.53.25BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.57.08BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.57.32 We will often look up to see a King Parrot quietly grazing within arm’s reach.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-05-31 12.43.57BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-09 14.59.22BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.59.39 A large flock of Little Corellas materialized briefly one week, transforming bare branches into the appearance of white blossom.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-01 18.56.37 The very same roosting trees were a sea of pink the following week with a large flock of galahs.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-05 18.16.37BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-05 18.16.48 The rich diversity of bird life in our garden is a constant joy. We found the perfect spot on a Winter Honeysuckle branch to hang my bronze bird feeder, a birthday gift from a dear friend. It looks like it has been there forever!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.20.06 I will finish with a few photos of a spectacular Winter night sky last week.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 20.25.29BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 20.30.07BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 20.24.07BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 21.15.46BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 20.30.11BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-18 21.16.52

The May Garden

With Autumn colds, exploratory trips of the local area and the demands of general day-to-day life, we have not spent as much time as we would have liked in the garden this month, but the weather has been superb! Hence, the recent excursions to the national parks of the hinterland and the escarpment, before it gets too cold or too snowy!!! We’ve visited Tuross Falls and the Cascades (Wadbilliga National Park); Deua National Park, both covered in last week’s post, and this last weekend, Lake Crackenback Resort, between  Jindabyne and Thredbo.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-12 12.27.36BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-02 16.50.50Ross has however managed to upkeep the vegetable garden from liming the soil to planting out new vegetable seedlings (sugarloaf cabbage, cauliflower, Winter greens and onions) and sowing spinach and snow pea seed.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-22 14.26.07BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-23 13.28.54BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-23 13.22.44BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.56.46BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0597 The capsicum are still productive, but the tomatoes are taking much longer to ripen. We harvested them all today to make Green Tomato Chutney!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-22 19.22.03BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-22 13.36.01BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-22 13.36.30He has also totally finished the pergola, with all the wiring done as well, so we should be able to train the climbers correctly for next season.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.21.46BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0587BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.18.48BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.19.07 We were rewarded with some late blooms of the climbing tea rose Adam.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.42.31Other roses still throwing out blooms include: Alister Stella Gray; Jude the Obscure and Evelyn; Heritage, Eglantyne and Alnwick; Mrs Herbert Stevens and Lamarque; Icegirl and The Children’s Rose; and Mutabilis and Monsieur Tillier.BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0596BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.02.40BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0590BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.41.56BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.58.16BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0592BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0577BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0578BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0594BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0595BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-02 17.06.03BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.10.37As you can see from the pergola photos, the Autumn foliage of the Snowball Tree (Viburnum opulus) has been superb from muted golds (south) to fiery reds (north).  BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-12 12.11.02BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.19.22BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.37.59 The Carolina Allspice beneath the snowball tree is also turning, its golden green leaves contrasting well with the red of the latter.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.37.49BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.16.14At the bottom of the garden, where the poplar and plums are bare, the pomegranate provides a welcome splash of gold.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.33.20 A softer gold carpet is forming under the Floribunda Crab Apple Tree.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.13.10 The maples too vary from an green-orange-red combination to more red-purple-orange hues, depending on the variety.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 12.21.21BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 12.56.02BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 12.01.38BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 16.59.07BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 16.59.02 In fact, the whole backdrop to the garden is in its most interesting and colourful phase.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 15.34.41BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 11.55.52The Paris daisies are in full gold regalia in the Moon Bed and attract many butterflies.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.36.58 The dahlias are the other major highlight in the May Garden.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-23 13.21.56 The tree dahlias are finally in bloom, their fragile, soft mauve-pink flowers and buds superbly contrasted against the intense blue Autumn skies.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.56.04BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.56.45BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 12.00.35BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.54.33BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.56.37BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.40.03 This is why I still grow them, despite their instant capitulation to wind and frost!