The November Garden

It has been a long month with a prolonged Spring season, but we are now finally getting some Summer heat with days in the mid-30s- a bit hot, given we haven’t had time to adjust yet (!), though we did have some beautiful soft recuperative rain last week. The Spring garden has been an absolute delight and quite magical, especially in the late afternoon sun.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-16-47-43blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-09-42-58blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-12-13-47-26 I think November has to be my favourite month with all the trees in their full regalia and Bearded Iris, Poppies and Roses all coming into their own. I just love the view from our verandah over our beautiful garden, with its borrowed landscape backdrop of trees of an infinite variety of foliage colour, texture, shape and form, especially in the misty rain or when the sun first comes up.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-16-45-39blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-15-09-19-04blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-15-07-41-58 The Soho Bed and Moon Bed have been such a show this Spring.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-09-43-04blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-12-13-47-22blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-29-12-17-07blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-04-11-25-22blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-29-12-09-48blognovgarden20reszdimg_1871blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-29-11-57-15blognovgarden20reszdimg_1969blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-28-13-52-13 The roses are in full swing. Here is a selection of blooms from each section of the garden:

Soho Bed:  Hybrid Tea and David Austin roses: From left to right:

Top Row: Big Purple; Alnwick and Eglantyne

Middle Row: Heaven Scent; Our Copper Queen and Fair Bianca

Bottom Row: Lolita; Just Joey and Mister Lincoln

Moon Bed:  David Austin roses: From left to right:

Top Row: Heritage; Lucetta and Windermere

Middle Row: Troilus; Jude the Obscure and Evelyn

Bottom Row: 2 photos William Morris; Golden Celebration;

Pergola:  Climbing roses: From left to right:

Top Row: Adam; Souvenir de la Malmaison and Madame Alfred Carrière

Bottom Row: La Reine Victoria; New Dawn and Devoniensis;

House Walls:  Climbing roses: From left to right:

Top Row: Lamarque; Mrs Herbert Stevens; Cecile Brunner

Bottom Row: Paul’s Himalayan Musk; Lamarque and Mrs Herbert Stevens;

Shed Front:   From left to right:

Top Row: Viridiflora; Archiduc Joseph and Madame Isaac Pereire

Bottom Row: Fantin Latour; Fritz Nobis and Leander;

Shed Back:   From left to right:

Top Row: Both photos Rêve d’Or

Bottom Row: Alister Stella Gray and Albertine;

Rugosas:   From left to right:

Top Row: Roseraie de l’Hay; Russelliana (not a rugosa but at the end of rugosa hedge) and Frau Dagmar Hastrup)

Bottom Row: Frau Dagmar Hastrup ; Madame Georges Bruant and Roseraie de l’Hay

Hedge:  From left to right:

Top Row: Kathleen; Stanwell Perpetual and Sombreuil

Bottom Row: Cornelia; Mutabilis and Penelope.

Cornelia has been such a show that she warrants another photo all of her own! She will eventually be supported by an arch. Sombreuil is on the other side.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-03-10-04-21Unexpected:   Unidentified root stocks instead of the roses I’d expected from the cuttings. Obviously, the originals had already died and been replaced by their root stocks: The deep red one is Dr. Huey, but I am not sure of the others: possibly Rosa multiflora (top left) and Rosa fortuniana (top right and bottom left), both of which have been used extensively as root stocks in the past.

The poppies have also been a visual delight from the simple wild form to the pink and purple peony poppies, which show such variation in colour and form.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0466blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-11-09-59-57blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-08-40-24blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-09-53-29blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-09-53-58 I love the seedheads, as well as their fairy-like appearance as they gradually lose their petals.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-13-24-39blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-13-24-42 The Iceland poppies planted last year are blooming for a second year and the new Ladybird Poppies Papaver commutatum ‘Ladybird’ are so dramatic, especially among the cornflowers, though the seed packet also obviously included corn poppy seedlings as well!blognovgarden20reszdimg_0065blognovgarden20reszdimg_0085blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-09-17-17blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-09-17-24blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-15-13-38-05blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-12-10-16-43 They replaced the ranunculus and Dutch Iris, which had their last blooms in early November.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0488blognovgarden20reszdimg_0484blognovgarden20reszdimg_0485blognovgarden20reszdimg_0482 The cornflowers and the Nigella orientalis ‘Transformer’ have persisted, as have the magical foxgloves, which have deepened in colour and have such amazing patterns in each bell. I love the seedheads of the nigella, which follow their exotic soft yellow flowers.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0008blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-09-55-16blognovgarden20reszdimg_0491blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-29-11-57-45blognovgarden20reszdimg_0393And the dahlias, despite their initial setback with the late frosts, have returned in a myriad of bright colours.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0006blognovgarden20reszdimg_0099blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-23-15-06-10blognovgarden20reszdimg_0440blognovgarden20reszdimg_0443blognovgarden20reszdimg_0093blognovgarden20reszdimg_0014blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-09-17-40Other blooms in the garden include: Feverfew, Lady’s Mantle (Moon Bed), Italian Lavender (Soho Bed) and Calendula (Herb Garden).blognovgarden20reszdimg_0091blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-05-18-45-02blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-28-13-45-45blognovgarden20reszdimg_0425 The Dianthus ‘Coconut Ice’ and ‘Doris’ are in full bloom in the treasure garden and the Rosalie Geranium and Convovulus provide a sea of blue. The bromeliads at the front entrance combine the blue and the pink.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-18-28-53blognovgarden20reszdimg_0438blognovgarden20reszdimg_0437blognovgarden20reszdimg_0047blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-07-11-21-28blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-08-47-49blognovgarden20reszdimg_0048 The blue flowering salvia in the Moon Bed is also in bloom, along with the white Aquilegia under the hydrangeas.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0454blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-14-18-58-04 I love the white petticoats of the Acanthus mollis.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-13-20-03-02blognovgarden20reszdimg_0410 Beside the pergola, the Snowball tree Viburnum opulus has been in flower for the whole month and has almost finished, the ground beneath it covered in its fallen snow-like petals.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-04-12-24-11blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-16-01-58blognovgarden20reszdimg_0418 The beautifully fragrant Philadelphus virginalis on the other side of the pergola has taken up the batten.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-11-21-08blognovgarden20reszdimg_0088 The Carolina Allspice in front of the Snowball tree has also lasted a long time.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0733 Both honeysuckles are starting to cover the fence well and I adore their fresh sweet scent.blognovgarden20reszdimg_0457blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-08-48-54 At the bottom of the garden, the sweet peas provide fragrance and the red bottlebrush provides a splash of colour, as does the ripening fruit on the mulberry tree.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-23-15-09-04blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-07-13-56-41blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-11-16-19-29 We have been enjoying its berries, along with the abundant strawberries, the loquats and the produce of the vegetable garden.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-18-13-44blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-15-32-01blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-10-26-04blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-18-05-52blognovgarden20reszdimg_1923 The birds and flying foxes are also in seventh heaven. The latter are so cute that it’s hard to begrudge them their bounty, though we do want some of the fruit!blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-08-27-22blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-20-16-59-55blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-20-17-00-11blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-20-17-00-37blognovgarden20reszdimg_0030 Visiting birds have included members of the Cockatoo family: Pink Galahs, Little Corellas, Sulphur-Crested Cockatoos and Black Cockatoos ;blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-18-20-32-31blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-11-06-38blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-11-07-11blognovgarden20reszdimg_0072blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-16-44-42blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-16-43-43blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-03-09-56-17blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-03-10-01-20 the parrot family: King Parrots, Crimson Rosellas and Eastern Rosellas and the equally colourful Rainbow Lorikeets;blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-18-41-03blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-06-11-35-37blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-06-11-38-24blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-06-11-37-16blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-06-11-35-46blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-06-11-35-43blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-11-16-14-44blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-20-16-54-32blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-20-16-58-41 and the Honeyeater family: an unidentified honeyeater in the grevillea and the delightful miniscule Scarlet Honeyeater.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-12-09-57-41blognovgarden50reszd2016-11-12-10-00-50-copy-2blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-16-09-47-36We also have a few White-faced Herons doing the rounds.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-17-44-21Residents include the male Satin Bowerbird;blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-17-53-37 the cheeky Grey Fantailsblognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-10-28-18 and a new baby magpie, raised in a nest high in the pepperina tree.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-06-11-38-45blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-11-16-47-53 We  found this exquisite little nest in our old camellia. Shaped like an elegant wineglass and bound by spiders’ webs, I suspect it belongs to our friend, the Grey Fantail!blognovgarden20reszdimg_0435The insects have also been revelling in the late Spring garden:  Bees in the poppies and butterflies on all the flowers;blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-08-40-35blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-18-39-52blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-11-16-14-23blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-18-12-13-32blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-09-07-37 beetles on the angelica seed heads and dahlias;blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-01-18-00-39blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-11-18-35-07 and Orange Stink Bugs on the cumquat trees- Ross’s form of Sport and Rec at the moment!blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-11-22-44blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-11-23-28 Not that he needs the extra work! Ross has been very busy in the garden: watering; sowing seed ; and transplanting the lemon verbena to the corner of the shed.blognovgarden20reszdimg_1928blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-29-17-27-54blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-10-09-10-55 He started digging up the shed bed for a cottage garden, removing the tree dahlia tubers, much to my reluctance and initial resistance and mollified only by planting one of the freshly sprouting tubers (much to his reluctance!) next to his new compost bays, supported by my neighbour’s tall buddleias. We also planned another rose arch where the rocks are positioned.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-12-19-16-50 As already mentioned , he finally assembled a compost bay out of recycled pallets behind the strawberry bed and it looks fantastic!blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-14-17-28-55 He had a play with a friend’s mulcher, reducing our enormous green waste pile to a much smaller amount of mulch for the vegie bed!blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-08-10-24-26 We also moved the potting area down to the bottom shady corner of the garden and marked out the edges of the garden beds, which we will demarcate with recycled fence palings.blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-14-17-47-26Our final job in November was to dig up the Narcissi from the Iris bed in the cutting garden, now that their foliage has died down, to allow more room for the Iris as they multiply. We transplanted the bulbs in groupings to naturalize in the lawn: The Ziva Paperwhites on either side of the garden end of the pergola, as shown; the Golden Dawn jonquils around the Lemonade Tree on the staircase; two groupings of Winter Sun under the Golden Hornet Crab Apple tree and the Native Frangipani and Acropolis in front of the Michelia at the entrance to the pergola and finally, the wild Pheasant’s Eye Actaea in a swathe between the birdbath and the hill, where they can run rampant to their hearts’ delight! Just have to clean up the Iris bed now and stake those layabout cornflowers!!!blognovgarden20reszdimg_0103blognovgarden20reszdimg_0086Meanwhile up in the house, I have been busy making felt poppy cushions, a birthday apron for a friend, who has just launched her new poetry book ‘Kangaroos in the Blood’, hence the theme of the apron (!), and our 2016 Christmas Cake and Pudding! Happy Birthday Liz!blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-15-12-55-50blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-18-18-41-09blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-18-18-51-42blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-18-18-54-34blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-21-20-23-41 I have also had a wonderful time arranging beautiful bouquets for the house, as well as for my daughter!blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-17-09-03-17blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-09-09-52-41blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-03-09-39-39blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-03-11-08-00blognovgarden20reszd2016-11-15-20-04-01blognovgarden20reszd2016-10-29-18-26-41

The October Garden

Well! What a month it has been! The mid-Spring garden has more than compensated for its late start and even though the temperatures are cooler than usual, the days are still sunny. There was an excellent fall of snow on the mountains last week – now that all the ski lifts have closed! The photos below were taken on our trips to Canberra on the 19th (first photo) and 23rd October (last 2 photos) this past week. It was actually snowing in Nimmitabel on Sunday!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0030blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0262blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0007 The cooler weather has prolonged the flowering season of many of the early Spring blooms, including bluebells under the crab apple tree, tulips (early October), hellebores and clivias.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0210blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-11-16-38blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0130blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0280 The trees have all just about gained their new foliage for the season, the poplars being the last trees to come into leaf, and the plums have finished flowering, while the crab apples are in their final days (photos 3 to 5).blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1893blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1902blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-09-08-14blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-26-00blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0116 The cockatoos (photos 3 and 4) and king parrots loved the blossoms- a bit crazy really, as they are depleting their future fruit source! The latter (photo 2) also love to graze the weeds in the vegie garden, as does the white-faced heron (photo 1)!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0300blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0279blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0024 blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0013The apples have luscious white blooms and are setting fruit already.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0111blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-11-02-22blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0119 Meantime, the loquat fruits are turning yellow, attracting king parrots and bowerbirds by day and possums and fruit bats at night, the latter occasionally waking us up with their skirmishes. I don’t think we humans will get much of a look in when it comes to the fruit!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0142blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1821 At least, the white mulberries are starting to ripen and the blueberries and raspberries are in flower.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0182blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0147blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0229 We have been feasting on delicious organic strawberries from our new bed, though I suspect a slug may also have been, as the wire guards preclude attack by birds or rabbits!blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-11-03-15blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0162 The rhubarb has also provided delicious desserts and I have been substituting angelica leaves for the sugar, at least in the fruit part of rhubarb and apple crumble- a great success!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0106blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0107 We have been enjoying our own home-grown onions, lettuce, rainbow chard and baby spinach from the vegetable garden.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-38-20blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-11-54-39I also made another batch of cumquat marmalade from the 1 kg fruit we harvested. I would strongly advise NOT to combine blogging with jam making, but I think I just got away with it. Even  though the marmalade is darker than usual, it set brilliantly! Fortunately, the cumquat trees are still covered in lots of new blooms. I love their sweet scent as we walk past them. The Michelia has almost finished flowering too, but the Weigela next door has now replaced it.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0199blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-16-43-08blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1691 Initially, its blooms opened white and I was a little disappointed, as I had bought it as a pink weigela to complement the pink flowering currant on the other side of the pergola entrance. I thought that the plant must have been mislabelled, but to my great delight, the blooms then turned a soft pink, deepening in intensity as they age. This plant is so pretty with its colour variations! The second photo below is my neighbour’s pure white weigela.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-16-33-07blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1850blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1692 Unfortunately, the flowering currant did not flower this year (with all its moves!), but it is doing well and the snowball tree behind it has masses of lime-green, turning white, globular blooms.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0096blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0088blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0090blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0238blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0299 The choisya has a mass of white starry flowers, which look very similar to the blooms of the citrus trees behind it.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0116-2 The Carolina Allspice has a number of buds this year, as has the Philadelphus virginalis, and I am keen to see the form of the latter’s blooms, as when it first bloomed last year, the flowers were the correct double form, but I did find some single ones later on, which could be root stock. We will just have to wait and see! On our recent trip to the Southern Highlands, we bought a Belle Etoile Philadelphus, with large single very fragrant flowers, which we have planted next to the old lilac on the fence. Ross has cut an archway between the bamboos and a path behind the large stand to access this part of the garden.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1907blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0209-2blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0205The blackbird has finished nesting in the bamboo, but a magpie has been very busy creating her brooding chamber high in the top of the Pepperina tree.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1861blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0346Our new Katherine Havermeyer lilac is a delight and is growing and blooming well.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-11-44-53 The Chaenomeles are still throwing out the odd bloom and the red rhododendron and white azalea are in full bloom, though we will probably move the azalea into a less shaded situation after it has finished flowering. My Grevillea ‘Lady X’ is perpetually in flower (last photo)!blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-38-58blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-24-22blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-20-25blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-23-30blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0298blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0251 Unlike the azalea, the Viburnum plicatum however appears to be thriving in full shade and we also bought two different hostas- Peter Pan and Allan P Mc Connell- from Moidart Nursery, near Bowral, to fill out this shady nook.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-21-38 I also discovered some Winter Aconite Eranthis hyemalis there- very expensive, as it is very difficult to source here in Australia- in fact, this is the only place I have ever seen it- and I may also let it run riot here among the snowdrops, though initially will put it in the treasure bed until I am sure it germinates next year! Here are the treasures we brought home!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1682blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0164 We also bought some blue primroses, a lovely deep blue auricula (photo 3), Pulsatilla vulgaris, Rhodohypoxis baurii (photo 4), a variegated Arabis procurrens and Azorella trifurcata to fill out the gaps in this bed as the grape hyacinth die down- I love their little seed pods (photo 2)! We planted the new plants in the treasure bed yesterday morning.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1684blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1974blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0291blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0245 The Lily of the Valley (photo 1) are also up and the Rosalie Geranium has returned. The Acanthus soldiers and blue Convovulus mauritanicus (photo 2) are on the march nearby. blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0054blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0211-2I love the pattern and form of the Acanthus, the photos below showing why their common name is Oyster Plant, and their colour really compliments the house walls. blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1837blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1834 The Garden beds have been such a treat this Spring!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0097-2blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0136blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0145blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0158blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0255 The Cutting Garden is a delight with lots of clear royal blue, pale hyacinth blue, bright gold and clean white Dutch Iris and blue cornflowers, forming a backdrop to the bright intense jewel-like ranunculus. Such a treat!blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-39-55blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1786blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-10-58-52blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0224blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0120blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0216-2blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0121blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0322blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-15-50-24 The beautifully-scented freesias (photo 1) have just about finished, but the nigella amongst it is in bud. I suspect they are the self-seeded progeny of last year’s lime-green variety (photo 2), rather than the new blue nigella, which we sowed last Autumn. The foxglove is in bloom again, its flowers displaying a similar habit to the weigela- white turning pink, from the base up (photos 3 and 4)!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0250blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0312blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0284blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0285 The Iceland Poppies from last year also self-seeded, producing white, gold and orange blooms. So stunning and long-lasting when cut.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-11-19-09blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-11-18-56 Here are more photos of the individual ranunculus blooms.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0091blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-30-15-41-43blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0124blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-15-51-18blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-16-11-36blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-28-54The Soho Bed  is such a picture and there is very little bare ground to be seen! I am a bit eclectic when it comes to style and colour, but somehow the jumble of colours seems to work – in my eyes anyway!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0204blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0210blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0240blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0067 The loyal wallflowers have been joined by a variety of other mauves and purples in the catmint, the wild poppies and the stunning Italian Lavender; blue forget-me-knot; pink thrift and verbena and gold highlights in the old gold bearded iris and now the geum.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-40-06blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-16-32blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1731blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0263blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0055blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0073blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0078 The bees, both honey bees and native bees, and butterflies are in heaven!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1924blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1911blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1908blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1946blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1926 Here are two Spring vases from the garden!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0330blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0133 The Moon Bed is also very beautiful with soft mauve bearded iris, rescued from the heavy shade of the cumquat trees and transplanted to the new Moon Bed, where they can recapture the glory of their flowering period.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0098blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0222blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-30-17 We did not know what colour they would be, so waited with baited breath as their blooms slowly opened. We were delighted with their dreamy colour, Ross’s favourite, and one which really suits the Moon Bed, while the gold bearded iris are perfect in our sunny Soho Bed!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0095blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-30-17 The blue salvia, yellow Paris daisies and day lilies and pink peony (1st photo below) are all growing madly and the roses all have fat buds and are just about to open! SO exciting! November is going to be heavenly! Even the roses from my cuttings last year are in bud! The second photo below shows the blooms of a white tree paeony Paeonia suffruticosa, which we saw at Red Cow Farm on our recent trip to the Southern Highlands , promptly purchasing a seedling, which we will plant at the bottom of the steps next to the pergola and the Philadelphus next Autumn! I will be describing this trip in more detail in my Favourite Gardens post in December.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0241blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1063blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1064 The highlight of the October roses has been the Yellow Banksia, R. banksia lutea, over the outdoor eating area. I can safely report it has now fully recovered from its drastic initial haircut and has been a mass of bright gold and softer lemon blooms!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1904blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-11-39-16blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0289blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0079 The Spirea on the fence nearby has also been a mass of blooms, but is now finishing off, while the honeysuckle is set to take over.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-30-11-06-22 blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0168blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0211The white banksia rose, R.banksiae alba plena, on the bottom future chook fence, has also been in full bloom, as has its partner, the Jasmine, Jasminium polyanthum.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-11-02-02blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-11-53-04 I think both of them are vigorous enough to compete with each other, as I have seen two instances out and about this Spring- a wall covered in yellow banksia and potato vine and an old pergola obliterated by a white banksia, a jasmine and a snail creeper!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1758blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0828 The Rugosas have also been beautiful, scenting the air round the vegie garden: in order, Frau Dagmar Hastrup, Mme Georges Bruant and Roseraie de L’Hay.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0109blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0262blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0295Mutabilis and Stanwell Perpetual have also had their first blooms.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-37-35blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-37-29My birthday Souvenir de la Malmaison appears to like her position in the middle of the pergola and her first blooms have been dreamy, though this particular lady does not like wet weather and has a tendency to ball, which is why she is in the middle rather than the more prominent ends of the pergola!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1852blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0089 Here are some other early starters in order:  Just Jude (2 photos); Viridiflora; Lamarque; Alister Stella Grey; Adam; Evelyn; Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose (2 photos); Countess Bertha; and Château de Clos Vougeot (2 photos).blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0017blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0261blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0320blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0241blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-26-26blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0226blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0223blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1819blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0023blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-27-04blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0247blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0160 My climbing Cécile Brünner (1st photo) on the front arch is just starting to bloom, a late small camellia beside her mirroring her form and colour (2nd photo).blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0209blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0248Spring is such a wonderful season! It’s hard dividing my time between the garden, blogging, cooking and sewing!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0075blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0070-2 I did finally finish assembling the small Spring cushions, helped my daughter make a bag and baked a delicious sponge for my husband’s birthday in mid-October.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0097blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0367And we have had visitors: Oliver and his son, Fagan, who miss the budgies (who have moved to my daughter’s flat) or probably more accurately, their bird seed!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1978blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1995blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1980 A brush-tailed possum, who wants to set up residence in the roof of the shed;blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1800 And finally, some Shetland ponies, who give rides to kids at the monthly markets and who are currently doing the rounds of Candelo, mowing lawns and paddocks in exchange for free feed! It’s such a great idea!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0353blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0083blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1831

The September Garden

It’s such an exciting month in the garden, as it is just waking up from its long Winter sleep. Every day, I look for new discoveries – fresh leaf, new blossom and the emergence of long-lost bulbs and perennials, which have disappeared over Winter. By the end of the month, the garden is positively exploding with fresh colour!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-10-27-36blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-40-24blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-13-19blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-13-14-39We have been fortunate to get good rain to start the growing season , the frosts have almost finished and the sunny days are getting longer and longer.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-08-49-57blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-09-35-29 The crab apple is in full bloom and beat the white prunus this year, though the latter quickly caught up and now dominates the garden by its sheer size!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-39-35blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-38-10 We were really thrilled to see the bluebells in bud under the crab apple !blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-11-02-25blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-11-02-48 The white mulberry and the maples have new leaf and buds forming, as have a number of the shrubs like the new pink weigela and spireae and viburnum, the latter two now opening up.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-13-15-21blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-12-12-11-13blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-36-43The garden is experiencing the changing of the guard from the final blooms of Winter honeysuckle and daphne to the yellow banksia rose and white maybush;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-23-23blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-23-35The violets to the new maple leaf and bulbs of the treasure garden in early September,blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-02-18-38-02blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-19-00-04blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-15-21-56 the latter in turn to be supplanted by the cutting garden as the month progressed;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-11-05-26 The pink violets to the red grevillea, Lady X;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-14-11-36-09 The japonicas, camellias and hellebores to the exochorda, lilacs, red rhododendron and roses; blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-50-13blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-35-46blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-33-13 blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-16-28-01The deep red hellebore finally got its act together with a late show of flowers.blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1147The roses have been shooting new leaves proliferously and the early roses are in bud: Chateau de Clos Vougeot (photo below) is the most advanced this year; the Banksia rose and Fortuneana are set to explode and we have new buds on Viridiflora and Countess Bertha,  Alister Stella Gray,  Stanwell Perpetual and Mutabilis,  Adam and the new Souvenir de la Malmaison.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-17-22-03Along the back path, the lilies are shooting madly, the acanthus has new flower spikes and the Italian lavender and daisies are in full bloom.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-10-32blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-15-16-51-28blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-12-41-11The sunny heads of the calendula complement the bright golden laburnum nearby.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-10-53blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-08-48-49The Peony has finally surfaced, as have the Snakes’ Head Fritillaries, whose pendant buds have such a distinctive chequerboard pattern. Here is the bud opening over the week.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-24-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-23-18-28-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-09-54-55A sole blossom on Narcissus panizzianus (1st photo below) has joined the clivea buds, which have opened into clear orange bells.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-00-56blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-10-30-52 The Cutting Garden is gaining more and more colour every day.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-13-14blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-46-36 blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-18-00-06We started the season with Bokassa Gold and Clusiana species tulips, which are now guarded by wire cages, since their first bloom (photo 2) was decapitated by the bower birds!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-13-32-44blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-13-02-15blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-09-17-39-14blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-13-30-16 The tulips are now in full steam. In order, two photos of each : Lily Tulips Claudia and Synaeda Orange; Destiny Parrot Tulip; Bokassa Red and Verandi; and pale pink Monet Tulips.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-12-11-42-43blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-24-33blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-45-55blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-09-13-55-35blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-54blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-04blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-30blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-11-52blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-46-27blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-11-32blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-12-46-49blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-13-47 In the daffodil row, Golden Dawn and Winter Sun have been joined by the delicate Actaea and luscious Acropolis.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-16-14-30blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-16-14-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-44-11blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-10-59-57 The divinely-scented freesias have finally opened, as well as a few blue  cornflower blooms and  a golden Iceberg Poppy from last year.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-23-18-31-29blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-32-54blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-14-11-24-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-34-43 And our first ranunculus is in bloom!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-12-47-51We labelled all the daffodil and tulip bulbs, so that when their foliage dies, I can transplant them to new areas around the garden.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-11-05-26In the Soho Bed, the loyal Wallflowers are now joined by pink verbena blooms, Italian Lavender, pink thrift and recovering catmint , as well as masses of sweet little forget-me-knots. We have even had our first wild poppy!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-10-27-55blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-25-34blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-13-13-58blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-10-56-33blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-41-23blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-10-38-23 We still need to thin out the peony poppies, which self-seeded from last year’s crop, but we have done the deed in the hand-sown bed, so it is looking much more ordered!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-18-17-18 Ross made a separate strawberry bed behind the peony poppies. blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-18-17-24 We weeded the Moon Bed.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-07-11-06-53 Ross has also done lots of work in the vegetable garden, including making protective wire guards. He has also potted new cuttings and planted out the rose cuttings, which were struck last year.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-09-36-14I too have been busy! In early September, I made a second batch of Spring bulb cushion panels, as well as some based on spring blossom and tulips, to keep me occupied until the garden started exploding in Spring growth. It is such an exciting time of year!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-00-16blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-18-36-17blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-10-14-00The birds are also loving the Spring! The female blackbird has made a nest in the giant bamboo, well away from the neighbourhood cats, but her mate still keeps a watchful eye on proceedings!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-09-54-36blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-14-46-05The male bower bird is in full decorating mode in his attempts to impress a mate! We caught him in the act, plucking a blue cornflower, the colour complementing his violet-blue eyes!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-09-50-40The Red-browed Firetail Finches and Eastern Spinebills are loving the insect life in the fresh new foliage.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-09-55-02blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-23-41blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-23-30The Silvereyes, Crimson Rosellas, King Parrots, and Satin Bowerbirds are feasting on the blossom!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-10-46-59blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-43-44 The latter two are also testing out the ripeness of the loquat fruit on a daily basis.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-17-15-44blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-18-06-12blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-18-08-04 It’s lovely to watch the parrots grazing in amongst the bluebells, the grass kept unmown for the bulbs, though I still hate it when the birds (I blame the bowerbirds!) cut off flower heads and new growth! Even the roses and grevillea have been attacked!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-08-46blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-08-34 And if that weren’t enough food, there is always grain to scavenge from my daughter’s budgie cage on the verandah! These birds are such characters!

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Do you think we should?
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What are they up to?
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Got it!
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I only have eyes for you!
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Lean pickings!
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A very handsome bird!

Finally, a few photos of special moments this first month of Spring… a spider web caught in the dew;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-10-06-25blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-10-07-10 a new sun for my daughter’s birthday;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-08-51-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-08-52-27 a rising moon and a beautiful fluffy sunset cloud.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-19-35-58blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1084blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1091

The August Garden

Spring is just around the corner and I can barely wait! Every day, I pop down to the garden at least three times to check on its progress and any new developments!

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Still frosty early mornings!
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Winter shade is also a constant challenge! This is a lunchtime photo!

BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.28.23 The days are very slowly lengthening, but we still get the odd sharp frost to remind us not to get ahead of ourselves and remove any protective mulch or hessian!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-14 10.50.15 The days have been just beautiful with stunning sunrises, followed by clear blue sunny skies.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 08.50.51BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 08.50.38BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.56.06 New leaf is starting to form on the quince tree (photo below) and roses in anticipation and the Spring bulbs are starting to appear.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.49.12

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My new birthday rose: Souvenir de la Malmaison

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I loved the colours on these old loquat tree leaves

I love my little treasure garden in the rockery beside the steps. Photos from all angles…!!!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 18.48.24BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-23 13.20.38BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-19 17.16.08 The Paper Daisies, Coconut Ice Pink and English primroses are all in full bloom and have been joined by miniature Tête à Tête daffodils, grape hyacinth and now a royal blue hyacinth!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.01.30BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-22 15.00.52BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-19 17.15.35BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.10.08BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 11.10.45BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 17.52.20 The violets behind them are still in full bloom and have even started colonizing the steps down to the garden.BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 19.06.06BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-01 18.20.30BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-05 13.29.04 In the Cutting Garden, the Paperwhite Zivas have been joined by Erlicheer Jonquils, fragrant Golden Dawn and Double Daffodil, Wintersun.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.20.13BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-15 11.43.45BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.45.10BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-17 15.15.31 The Bokassa Gold tulips are in full glory, having started the month as a closed elegant bud, gradually colouring, then opening to a beautiful golden goblet, which looks magnificent when it catches the sun!BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-15 17.57.48BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-16 17.14.40BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.46.26BlogSpring bulbs 20%Reszd2016-08-18 14.45.57 The little species tulips (photos 2 & 3) and Grandma’s Freesias (photo 1) are also in bud and the leaves of last year’s tulips (photo 4) are growing madly, though I suspect their blooms will not quite match those of last Spring!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.25.20BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.25.05BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-24 11.24.23BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-25 17.53.42 We also still have snowdrops (photo 1) and snowflakes (photos 2 and 3).BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-06 17.47.41BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-01 18.34.04

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Snowflakes in my neighbour’s garden

The hellebores are also persisting, despite the nasty tactics of the bowerbirds, who like to behead both hellebore and erlicheer blooms! Quite distressing, as they are still such precious specimens- I am so looking forward to the day when I have masses of hellebores and snowflakes like my neighbour’s garden, so that the odd discarded bloom doesn’t matter!!!BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-05 13.20.29BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-03 12.57.39BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-14 10.47.13BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-07-31 16.58.52BlogAugustGarden20%Reszd2016-08-12 14.59.52