Favourite Gardens Regularly Open to the Public : Sculpture Gardens

I love sculpture in the garden! There is something about sculpture, which lends itself to open spaces. Perhaps, it is the form and texture, especially when made of natural materials like wood and stone, that blends in so well with the natural landscape.

While they are perfect as focal points in the garden, directing the eye and enhancing corners, I also love visiting gardens which are totally devoted to sculptures – for example, the McClelland Sculpture Gallery, Victoria, and Fleurty’s Café, Tasmania, as well as sculpture shows like Lorne and Bermagui. This lovely bronze sculpture, ‘First Flight’ by Albert Bruce Joy (1842-1924), provides a focal point in the garden of Overbecks Museum in Salcombe, Devon.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (150)Sculptures can be made of a wide variety of materials from natural wood and stone to the traditional bronze, iron and other metals; brightly coloured plastics; and recycled machinery parts or just plain junk! They can be monochrome or brightly coloured; static or moving; enormous or tiny; and private or public. It is fascinating seeing what can be created, especially with recycled material,  and can provide much amusement, as well as appreciation.BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-21 11.51.40BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0599BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-21 11.49.29BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-22 11.49.33BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0601In this post, I will be exploring a wide variety of ‘sculpture gardens’, from their use as focal decorative points of the garden, as well as functional use, to collective sculpture gardens, walks and shows; and from traditional forms to more contemporary modern applications. I will also feature a few sculptors as well. It is also worth revisiting some of my older posts, which have featured other sculpture gardens like Heide; Werribee and Carrick Hill. See: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/02/09/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-historic-homes-and-gardens/ .

Yengo , 8 Queens Avenue, Mt. Wilson, NSW

Open daily during Spring (October/November) and Autumn (April/May), otherwise weekends 10am-6pm or by appointment

$10 adults; $8 Seniors and $3 for children

I will start with Yengo in Mt. Wilson, a garden, which epitomizes the use of traditional bronze sculptures in the garden as focal points, as well as for just sheer beauty. The property was first bought by Jesse Gregson in 1877 and he spent the next 2 years building a stone house and developing an alpine  garden with the help of the Director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, Charles Moore, and the government botanist, Joseph Henry Maiden. The house and garden have been restored by the owners, Peter and Ann Piggot, whom we met on our visit to Mt Wilson, back in 1998.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (149)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (147)It is a beautiful garden with some very old evergreen trees, planted in 1880, including several Himalayan Deodars; Western Red Cedars from America; a Sequoia; a Cedar of Lebanon and a Spanish Cork.  There are also some beautiful deciduous trees, including Dogwoods and over 60 varieties of Japanese Maples; tall old tree ferns; banks of rhododendrons and azaleas and drifts of bluebells in Spring; mature wisteria and clematis; a walled garden and many beautiful ponds and water features.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (148)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (144) The garden is enhanced by and showcases some very beautiful, traditional bronze sculptures, made by English-based sculptors Lloyd le Blanc (animals : eg gazelles; a brolga fountain and a lyrebird) and Judith Holmes Drewry (portraits and the female form).

BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (139)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (122) Many of the scupltures are for sale and range in price from $1700 to $50,000. They also have their own sculpture garden and gallery at: http://www.leblancfineart.com/judith-holmes-drewry/bronze-sculpture-of-figures-life-size/index.html.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (141)

Gourmet chef and hotelier, Raymond  Blanc, of Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons , Great Milton, Oxfordshire, UK  (http://www.raymondblanc.com/restaurants-cookery-school/le-manoir-aux-quatsaisons/) also loves their work, which you can see at: http://www.leblancfineart.com/le-manoir-aux-quat-saisons.html.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (145)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (146) Unfortunately, Judith is no longer with us, but you can learn more about Lloyd on : http://www.meltontimes.co.uk/news/local/meet-the-artist-behind-melton-s-sculpture-project-1-4340914.

Peacocks wander round the garden- very beautiful and stately, though I know from experience, my parents having kept peacocks when I was a child, that they are probably not the best stewards for a garden!BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (140)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (143)

Yengo was also the first endangered species reserve in Australia, having provided sanctuary for the rare Parma Wallaby since 1969. These dear little animals were reintroduced to the mainland after their numbers were decimated by feral cats and foxes.See:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parma_wallaby   and   http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Macropus_parma/.

For a visual tour of the garden, please see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DiL2YOt2w0.

Carl Merten and Joan Relke, Chinook , NSW

Another wonderful sculptor couple, who we were lucky enough to meet, are Carl Merten and Joan Relke (http://sculptors.net.au/). My friend, Liz, introduced us to Carl and Joan, when we were looking for an interesting work experience for our daughter Jen, when she was in Grade 10. They were so generous with both their knowledge and time and it was a wonderful experience for her. Carl and Joan lead busy lives working on commissions and exhibitions, as well as teaching workshops. Their major commissions are made of stainless steel, cast bronze, cast aluminium, and stone and grace many of Australia’s public parks and buildings, while their medium sized works in bronze, stone, stainless steel, and ceramics decorate the offices, homes, and gardens of corporate and private collectors.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (126)

Carl, who originally trained as a silversmith with his identical twin brother, Rex Steele Merten (http://www.thechronicle.com.au/news/one-of-the-only-ways-to-tell-the-merten-twins-apar/2137968/), is famous for his  public monumental work, including figurative bronze sculptures of famous Australians or as he puts it : ‘dead white males’, like famous Australian explorers and the coal miners, who lost their lives in Cessnock. He also creates dancing figures and musical and natural forms. See: http://newengland.focusmag.com.au/carl-merten-local-artist/. BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (120)
Joan creates beautiful goddesses – most of her work is inspired by female imagery and mythological themes. She also explores zen concepts in the form of miniature zen gardens. I first saw her work at McGrath’s garden in Uralla- see photo above.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (125)

Carl and Joan have been partners for over 30 years, and while they each have their individual style, they have worked together on some projects like their sculptures in Uralla, NSW, based on the circumpolar constellations of the Southern Hemisphere : Carl’s Carina (photo above) and Joan’s Spirit of the Southern Cross (photo below).BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (124)

They were working on this project during Jen’s work experience. We thanked them for their kindness with a sculptural carrot cake, commemorating their work at Uralla!BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (118)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (121)William Ricketts Sanctuary, Mt Dandenong Tourist Rd, Mt Dandenong, VIC

http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/william-ricketts-sanctuary-gardens-of-the-dandenongs  and  http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/315820/Park-note-William-Ricketts-Sanctuary.pdf

10am-4.30pm daily, except Christmas Day and Total Fire Ban days. Free.

William Ricketts Sanctuary is a very famous old sculpture garden, set in the beautiful Mountain Ash forests and ferny glades of Mt Dandenong, 1 hour east of Melbourne.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (131)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (130)William Ricketts (1898-1993) was also apprenticed to a jeweller, aged 14 years old, but he enjoyed modelling with clay. He settled in the area in 1934, initially renting the property, but then purchasing the freehold title in 1941. At that stage, the property was heavily deforested and William was keen to let the block regenerate naturally. He was a keen environmentalist and naturalist and was appalled by the mass destruction of the environment and natural habitats, as he believed that the natural environment is entrusted to all of us and that by nurturing the earth, we nurture life itself.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (132)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (133) He also had a deep love and respect for Australian aborigines, having spent many months between 1949 and 1960 living and learning from the Pitjantjatjara and Arrernte Aboriginal communities in Central Australia. Their tradition and culture inspired him to create a permanent sculpture gallery, devoted to the Australian Aborigine and all Australians.

BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (128)

Originally called ‘Potter’s Sanctuary’, it was opened to the public in 1942. The collection includes 92 ceramic sculptures of people and animals. The kiln-fired clay was fired to 100 degrees Celsius and then set into the environment.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (123)

The Victorian Government bought the property from William Ricketts in 1961. Extra additions by the Forest Commission increased the property to its present 15 hectares. It was renamed ‘William Ricketts Sanctuary’ and officially opened in 1962. In 1981, it was classified by the National Trust as a site of local significance. It has significant cultural value, as the outdoor sculptures are components of an overall theme. They bear testimony to the vision and dedication of Ricketts’ campaign for understanding and respect for indigenous Australians and the environment.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (138)

Dromkeen, 1012 Gisborne-Kilmore Rd, Riddells Creek, VIC

http://www.dromkeen.com.au/  and http://www.slav.vic.edu.au/synergy/volume-10-number-1-2012/perspectives-local-/227-dromkeen-national-centre-for-picture-book-art

Thursday-Saturday 10am-4pm. Free.

Another garden, which contained sculptures based on a theme, was Dromkeen, the home of Children’s Literature, but unfortunately you can no longer see these sculptures in their original setting.BlogSculpture50%Reszdaug 2010 954BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 191Dromkeen Homestead was originally built in 1889 as the country estate of Victorian Supreme Court Judge, Arthur Chomley, and was named after his mother’s family home in Dromkeen, County Limerick, Ireland. In 1973, Joyce and Courtney Oldmeadow used the homestead as a private residence and educational bookshop with public displays of original artworks and manuscripts from Australian Children’s picture books. Over the years, it became known as the home of Australian Children’s Literature. It was purchased by Scholastic Australia in 1985 and they continued to maintain the Dromkeen Collection, until it was moved to the State Library in 2012. The collection contains 7500 original illustrations, including sketches, preliminary artwork, diagrams and mock-ups; a historic book collection; the Dromkeen archive and the 6 Bronze sculptures of Australian picture-book characters, which used to grace the gardens. See: http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/about-dromkeen.BlogSculpture50%Reszdaug 2010 951BlogSculpture50%Reszdaug 2010 959

We were very lucky to be able to visit it twice during our sojourn in Victoria and I was very saddened to see For Sale signs outside the old home and equally elated, on doing research for this post, to discover that Dromkeen had reopened as a centre for children’s literature. Purchased by the Joiner family in 2013, it once again hosts school and tertiary programs; writing camps; holiday literary programs; and on 19th March 2016, the Dromkeen Literary Festival, a full day of talks and readings by children’s authors and illustrators; book signings and sales; and book-related activities in the garden, including storybook craft; book mural art; cartoons; puppetry; dragons and airbrush; and face painting. See: http://www.dromkeen.com.au/litfest/.BlogSculpture50%Reszdaug 2010 942BlogSculpture50%Reszdaug 2010 953There is a tearoom and café, as well as a separate function centre for conferences, business seminars, professional development, children’s birthday parties and even art classes. The garden is available for weddings and photography shoots.BlogSculpture50%Reszdaug 2010 940Then there are the sculptures made from less traditional materials or more contemporary in approach :

Daniel Jenkins, 10 Coolavin Rd, Metung, VIC

http://www.danieljenkins.com.au/  and  https://www.facebook.com/pages/daniel-jenkins-studios-metung/119793984731872

We also feel very fortunate to have visited Daniel Jenkins’ studio and gardens when we did in 2007, as they too are no longer open to the public, unless by private appointment. I love the whimsical nature of his works and his sense of fun!BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3474BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3485Daniel was born in Kansas, USA, in 1947 and came to Australia in 1981. Like William Ricketts and Carl Merten, he is also a jeweller and silversmith by trade. He studied extensively in Europe, including visiting Venice as part of the Palladio Foundation scholarship, where he learned the technique of repoussé, where metal is beaten from the inside to give shape and relief to the design.BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3464BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3480

His Meme series and taller Wobe series are marquettes with androgenous bodies and fixed or moveable heads. They are made of hollow form copper, which has been repousséd and patinated, a technique which is safe for the birds and lasts a long time.BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3462 He also makes figurative and interpretive work, ladder forms and urns and bottles.BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3473

His Lulu birds and animal-like weather vanes are also great fun. BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3476BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3475

He also loves creating kinetic works, which turn in the wind.BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3472BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3483BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3486BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3484His work can be seen high up in the air above the Bourke Street Mall in Swanston Street, Melbourne. Each of the weather vanes is in the shape of an animal, symbolizing the various aspects of the city : a horse (sport and culture) ; bird (the city’s parks and gardens) ; fish (the waterways of Melbourne); and pig (the city’s hopes and future : pigs can fly). It was commissioned by the City of Melbourne and unveiled in March 1993.  See: http://www.emelbourne.net.au/biogs/EM02126b.htm. He also had an exhibition at my favourite Cloudehille Gardens in 2011.BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3592Kate Shone is another sculptor in the Gippsland area, who makes whimsical sculptures out of recycled junk. Unfortunately, we never managed a visit, as she was closed both times we passed through, but we will get there one day. See her work at: http://www.junkyarddoll.com.au/. We did however see her insects (photo above) at the open house at The Long Now, Nowa Nowa in 2007! See: http://creative.vic.gov.au/Arts_in_Victoria/Features/Feature_Stories/Nowa_Nowa_Open_for_Inspection.BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3554BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3555BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3601There are also a number of outdoor sculpture in the park below the house along the river.

BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3552BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3551BlogSculpture30%ReszdDSCF3547Possum Gully Fine Arts, 428 Possum Gully Rd. , Adelaide Lead, VIC

The signposted turn-off is 4km from Maryborough, en route to Avoca, via the Pyrenees Highway.

Saturday, Sunday and Public Holidays, 11am-5pm

http://www.possumgullyfinearts.com.au/ http://www.possumgullyfinearts.com.au/index.php/component/content/article/2-uncategorised/8-media  and  http://www.visitmaryborough.com.au/arts-culture-heritage/possum-gully-road-gallery.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 629BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 625While there are many galleries selling sculpture, I have included this delightful mud-brick gallery, because many of its sculptures are exhibited in the garden.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 612BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 619 BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 626There are also many interesting pieces for the garden from weather vanes to garden pots and natural  birdbaths.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 624BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 627BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 623BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 621I love this interesting sculpture, photographed below.

BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 618BlogSculpture50%Reszdoct 2010 617

Shades of Gray, Cnr Farnsworth and Brown Streets, Castlemaine, VIC

http://www.shadesofgray.net.au/    and  https://thecountryphiles.com/2013/12/06/interview-peter-chelly-gray-shades-of-gray/.BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 488BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 485BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 466BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 476BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 468Chelly and Peter Gray also use recycled metal to create unique artworks from candelabras and bowls to beds, mirrors, fire screens, sculptures and garden art. They were actually our neighbours when we lived briefly in Castlemaine and we used to love visiting their creative and whimsical garden. Set on a steep hill, it was so overgrown and blowsy and had an air of mystery about it. I also loved their huge Great Dane, Coco!BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 457BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 454BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 456BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 438BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 471BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 435BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 441BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 469BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 462BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 458They have displayed their work at Daylesford’s Convent Gallery, the Guggenheim in New York and in galleries and shops around Australia, as well as doing commissions for private homes, restaurants, vineyards, cafes and corporate spaces.BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 448BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 449BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 472

Their work, home and gallery have appeared in magazines including Vogue Living, Country Style, InsideOut and Marie Clare. See the May edition of Australia Country Style. Originally, both artists trained in ceramics, but they have been working with metal for the past 19 years, since a chance encounter with a roll of rusty wire! The two galleries house a selection of their work: egg cups, candelabras, grapevine leaf mirrors,  wall features, bowls, fire screens and chandeliers.BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 478BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 479BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 475 Other pieces, such as metal arbours, outdoor sculptures, tables and chairs, are scattered throughout the garden.BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 446BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 434BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 464BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 436They are open most long weekends; Easter; the Castlemaine State Festival (March-April, every 2nd year on odd years) ; the Melbourne Cup week, when they have their 2016 annual exhibition 30 October – 6 November (closed Wednesday 2 November) and most weekends in November and December 10am-4pm; or by appointment.BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 473BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 461BlogSculpture50%Reszdmarchapril 429

Tim Johnson, Artist and Basket Weaver, Isle of Wight, UK

http://www.timjohnsonartist.com/basketmaking/  and http://www.timjohnsonartist.com/blog/

Outdoor sculptures can also be made of natural found materials like grasses, canes and twigs, although they are not quite as durable. When he was younger and less famous, Tim was a visiting artist-in-residence for 2 months at our local art gallery, NERAM (New England Regional Art Museum) in Armidale in 2000.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (136) My children attended a number of art classes at the gallery, including Tim’s inspirational workshop on Sculpting with Natural Materials. I was so impressed with Chris’s huge hanging trout, Jenny’s frill-necked lizard and goanna and little Caroline’s chook! You can see Tim in action at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4PeUQ6Dx2w. BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (137)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (134)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (135)

Herring Island, Yarra River, Melbourne, VIC

http://www.herringisland.org/getto.htm ;  http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/herring-island and http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/315520/Heritage-story-Herring-Island-the-island-of-dreams.pdf.

Andy Goldsworthy is the master-extraordinaire of ephemeral artworks, often only existing in the beautiful photographs he takes to record their fleeting presence, but his ‘Cairn’ (composed of Castlemaine Slate for the Melbourne Festival 1997) and ‘Stone House’ (Dunkeld Sandstone) are two of his more permanent sculptures and can be viewed at Herring Island on the Yarra River. For more on Andy Goldsworthy, see : http://visualmelt.com/Andy-Goldsworthyhttp://www.morning-earth.org/ARTISTNATURALISTS/AN_Goldsworthy.html.  These You-Tube clips are also worth watching : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPDH8yCnlk0 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QRfXRtE6tw.BlogSculpture50%ReszdIMG_0126

Originally, a pile of mullock heaps, created by silt dumped from Yarra River dredging and covered in Kikuya grass, Herring Island was levelled, a lawn established and further trees, shrubs and grasses planted to create the Herring Island Environmental Sculpture Park. The venue is often used during the Melbourne Festival with sculptures exhibited both in the art gallery and outside in the conservation area.BlogSculpture50%ReszdIMG_0104BlogSculpture50%ReszdIMG_0103 Other sculptures include: John Golling’s ‘Falling Fence’; Ellen Jose’s’ Tanderrum’ and Robert Bridgewater’s ‘Scaled Stem’. See: http://www.herringisland.org/arts.htm  and  http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/313803/Park-note-Herring-Island-Environmental-Sculpture-Park.pdf.BlogSculpture50%ReszdIMG_0117BlogSculpture50%ReszdIMG_0113McClelland Sculpture Gallery and Sculpture Park, 390 McClelland Drive Langwarrin, VIC

http://www.mcclellandgallery.com/  and  http://www.mcclellandgallery.com/index.php?page=outdoor-sculpture-collection.

Open Tuesday-Sunday  10am-5pmBlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 075We used to love visiting this sculpture park on the Mornington Peninsula, close to Frankston and Elisabeth Murdoch’s garden at Cruden Farm. Exhibitions we attended included : Ron Mueck’s 3m high ‘Wild Man’ in 2008; Augustine Dall’Ava’s colourful dynamic sculpture in his exhibition: ‘Journey’ and a fascinating exhibition titled: ‘Nest: The Art of Birds’ in 2013, displaying the ingenuity, beauty and originality of over 70 bird nests from the collections of Museum Victoria and Gay Bilson. See: http://www.mcclellandgallery.com/index.php?page=past-exhibitions.

Established in 1971 on 16ha land, McClelland Sculpture Park is Australia’s leading sculpture park and showcases over 100 permanent outdoor sculptures from 1887 to the present day in a variety of settings from tea-tree forests to heathland; bracken paths; landscaped gardens and lakes.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 079BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 087 It has a long affinity with Centre 5 artists, who established themselves in Melbourne in 1959 to promote contemporary sculpture.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 097BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 096

There is also a biennial McClelland Sculpture Survey and Award for Contemporary Outdoor Sculpture. BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 099BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 089

Here are photos of some of the sculptures:

Peter Corlett : Tarax Play Sculpture 1969. The white circular forms are made of enamelled ferro-cement.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 091

John Kelly : Alien 2006. Rusted corten steel.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 093

Lisa Roet :  White Ape 2005. Fibreglass coating a corten steel base.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 095

Ken Unsworth :  Annulus 2007. Stone, stainless steel and galvanised steel.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 098

Philip Rice :  Ratyte  2005. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiT2nY2QmOM.BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 077

Teisutis Zikaris : Untitled (GPO) 1964. BlogSculpture25%Reszdmelbourne spring 082

Barossa Scupture Park, Mengler’s Hill Lookout, Tanunda, SA

http://www.barossasculpturepark.com/BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7380In South Australia, the Barossa Scupture Park contains the works of 9 sculptors from Japan, the United States, France and Australia, who attended the  Barossa International Sculpture Symposium for 6 weeks at this site in 1988. They created site-specific works in local marble and granite, depicting the Barossa environment. Here are photos of some of the work:

Discover : Mary Gerken, Iowa, USA

BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7404

Dreaming : Cliff Axelsen, Australia

BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7392

Shaman’s Passage : Susan Falkman, Wisconsin, USA

BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7395

Contemplation : Christine Giraud, FranceBlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7410 We were lucky enough to visit the Barossa Valley during the second Barossa International Sculpture Symposium, held in 2008 to commemorate the 20-year anniversary, and were able to watch the sculptors in action.BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7381Persephone :  Kevin Free, Victoria, AustraliaBlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7390BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_7386Here is a link to other sculpture parks in the world: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/sculptureparks/.

Fleurty’s Café and Farm Walks, 3866 Channel Highway, Birch’s Bay, TAS

http://www.fleurtys.com.au/   and   http://www.fleurtys.com.au/walks.html.

10am-4pm   Thursday – Sunday and Monday Public HolidaysBlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.35.11BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.35.47Located 50km and 50 minute drive south of Hobart and with spectacular views of the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Fleurty’s Café is well worth visiting. It was named after Charles Fleurty, a convict sawyer, who worked in Birch’s Bay back in the late 1820s and is also commemorated in the local place names of Fleurty’s Point and Fleurty’s Creek, though the café is now called Pepperberries Garden Café.BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.34.46Unfortunately, we arrived smack bang on closing time, so we didn’t get to sample the superb seasonal menu, but we were able to explore the Sculpture Trail, which takes you past the distillery, now a cottage for the artist-in-residence, as well as a workshop venue;BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.40.57BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.37.59BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.36.57Past all the orchard trees and lovely cool climate vegetable beds of artichokes, rhubarb, garlic, raspberries and black currants, which are used in the menu of Pepperberries Garden Café, as well as delicious chutneys and preserves. They also sell tapas oils, vinegars and native bush spices, including lemon myrtle, wattle seed and bush tomato, as well as supplying Dutch Iris to the Tasmanian and mainland markets.BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.36.24BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.31.31BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.31.55Past the beds of Native Pepper, the berries and leaves harvested and packaged as Diemen Pepper and up past proteas and leucadendrons into the forest. There is 100ha of native bush, including a private forest reserve.BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.48.11BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.43.38BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.45.54The walk goes up the hill to the top, where unfortunately, we started to lose our Winter light! We thoroughly enjoyed finding all the sculptures, especially the swinging moon; the colourful mosaic pebbles and glass lights ; the exquisite mussel shell dishes and the variety of seating along the trail. Here is a sample:BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.45.32BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.50.08BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 15.52.14BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.00.31BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.04.28BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.09.54BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.12.12BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.12.40BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.17.12BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.27.11BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.27.47BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.29.09BlogSculpture50%Reszd2013-06-16 16.28.18Tamworth Bicentennial Park, Kable Ave, Tamworth, NSW

We recently had a picnic lunch in this park en route to Armidale and were very impressed by the stone sculptures and etchings of Australian animals and events from Tamworth’s history, which lined the duck pond.BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0455 BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0441BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0445BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0440BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0447BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0442BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0451BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0454There is also the Tamworth Light Horse Memorial, a bronze cast statue of a Waler horse and an Australian Light Horse Trooper, which was created by nationally renowned artist Tanya Bartlett. This statue pays homage to the important roll of the ‘Waler’ horses’ during the Boer War in South Africa and in the Middle East during World War I and compliments the Man O War Gates. See: http://monumentaustralia.org.au/search/display/23369-the-memorial-to-the-australian-light-horse.BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0472BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0471BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0473Sculpture Shows

Sculpture shows are also a great venue for displaying artist’s work, which often ends up in private collections and art galleries. Sometimes, they are adjunct to larger garden shows like the  International Plant and Flower Show, Melbourne or Tesselaars Spring Festivals; but we have also visited specific sculpture shows at Lorne and Bermagui.

Lorne Sculpture Biennale, Lorne Foreshore, Lorne, VIC

http://lornesculpture.com/

12 March -3 April 2016

One of Australia’s largest contemporary sculpture events, we attended in 2011 and 2014. See: http://lornesculpture.com/images/LSB%20catalogue/LS2011_CATALOGUE.pdf    and        http://lornesculpture.com/images/LSB%20catalogue/Lorne_Sculpture_Biennale_Catalogue_2014.pdf

Here are some photos:

Matthew Harding : Within : 2014.  Mirror stainless steel.

BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 11.05.02

Lisa Anderson : Tiga Tiga (Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep) : 2014. Tents, recycled plastic, lights

 

BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 11.11.40BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 11.12.04

Deborah Sleeman : Forest : 2014. Pressed tin, copper, galvanized iron, cast glass, found objects, steel, screws and rivets.BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 11.21.53

Geoffrey Ricardo : The End, The Beginning : 2014. Copper and stainless steel.BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 12.39.33

Jeff Raglus : ‘Long Way to the Top’… Aka’Ska Tissue’ : 2011. Carved cypress wood sculpture, finished in oil paints.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 544 It includes a fantastic sculpture trail with around 35 major sculptures positioned along the coastline, a small sculpture collection (The Collectors’ Project) and a Sculpturscape, where sculptors create sculptural projects on site over two days. The photos below show some of the smaller scuptures in the shops:

Anton Hasell : HMS Beagle : 2011. Cast brass, cast bronze and oil paints.

BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 646

Ivana Perkins: Penguins on Ice : 2011. Bronze penguins on perspex box with seabird skulls.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 645 Sculpturscape, the only such event in Australia and possibly globally, comprises four artists/artist teams, a total of 16 artists on display over all four weekends of the exhibition, each creating a sculptural piece over two days. Here is another cute sculpture from 2014 :

Dean Putting : Little Fellow : 2014. Concrete.BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 12.40.38

Here are some more photos of the sculptures.

Matthew Harding : Centripetal : 2011. Stainless steel.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 625BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 626

Candy Stephens:  Now and Then : 2011. Steel, wire, circuit boards, television, DVD, lights.

BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 629BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 632Anderson Hunt : Tweet- The Silence of Speak : 2011. Rolled and fabricated mild steel and apoxy coating.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 565Carmel Wallace : Red Sea Installation : 2011. Steel and mixed media, including recycled cray pot collars and cable ties.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 495Phillip Doggett Williams : No Climate for Change : 2011. Mixed media.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 695Ewen Coates : Multiverse : 2011. Fibreglass resin, steel and concrete.BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 545

Mini Dennett : Home Sweet- Home Snug Containment of Belonging : 2011. Mixed media.

BlogSculpture50%Reszdoctober 2011 540

Louise Paramor :  The Wild Card : 2014. Plastic and fibreglass.BlogSculpture25%Reszd2014-03-23 11.15.22

Many of the sculptures ended up gracing the grounds of Qdos Gallery in Lorne. See: http://www.qdosarts.com/ and http://www.qdosarts.com/sculpturepark.aspx?page=sculpturepark

Sculpture on the Edge, Bermagui, NSW

http://www.sculpturebermagui.org.au/

5th to 16th March 2016

A collection of large scale sculptures on Endeavour Point Headland, Dickinson Park, and Horseshoe Bay beach with a smaller sculptures displayed in the Bermagui Community Centre.BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.22.45BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.42.31BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.58.07BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.52.16 Here are some of the sculptures:

Jesse Graham : Penny Dragon and Vulcor       BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.40.04BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.38.41BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.39.12Jimmy Rix  :  Shy  BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.47.51 Richard Moffatt  :  Is There a Dog?BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.41.04

Braidwood Central School :  The Birds;  School of FishesBlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.43.57BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.44.06BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.44.19BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.44.12BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.46.45Suzie Bleach and Andy Townsend :  A Burden… BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.45.28BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.45.36Tony Millard : This is where we are heading… BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.34.28

Michael Purdy : Ned… BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.31.47Ross Cameron : Tide Spiral. Steel and concrete. Winner 2015: Now at Short Point, Merimbula. See: http://www.sculpturebermagui.org.au/sculpture_on_the_edge_news.htm.BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 09.21.16

In the community hall:

John Gosch : Phoenix; 670 recycled spark plugsBlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 10.39.34BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 10.39.18Tracey Sarsfield : The Departed Horizon…BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 10.42.24Darren Mongta : King Brown. Carved out of a single branch.BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 10.47.49BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-03-08 10.47.57Analemmatic Sundials

Finally, sculptures are not only decorative, but can serve a functional purpose, as in sundials. I love all the different types : from traditional and armillary spheres (Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney and the National Botanic Gardens, Canberra) to the analemmatic sundials we visited at Kingston, SA and Benalla, Vic.BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-22 11.48.58BlogSculpture50%Reszdnov 2011 102BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-10-06 11.29.09BlogSculpture20%Reszd2015-10-06 11.29.20 In an analemmatic sundial, a figure-of-eight is etched into the pavement, with the observer’s head forming a shadow on the ground, denoting the time.BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8041

Kingston SE Sundial, Corner of Princes Highway and Watson Street , Kingston, SA

http://www.kingstondc.sa.gov.au/page.aspx?u=212

I love this sundial, situated on a small island in Maria Creek, just next to Apex Park, which we stop at every time we are driving to Robe.BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8064BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8035BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8039BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8040BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8042BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8043 We especially the stone carvings, etchings and sculptures of marine life by Silvio Apponyi. They include a seal, a crab, fish, frogs, lizards, abalone, birds and local flora.BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_9899BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8033BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_9894BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_8031

Benalla Analemmatic Sundial, Fawckner Drive, Benalla, VIC

http://brokenriverbulletin.com.au/the-benalla-analemmatic-sundial/

Built in 2005 by the Rotary Club to commemorate 65 years of Rotary Club service to Benalla and 100 years of the Rotary organisation.BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_9508BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_9510 Lake Benalla is also enhanced by the Gaudi-esque Ceramic Mural nearby on Mair St, next to the Benalla Art Gallery, a community project started in 1983. See: http://melbournedaily.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/benalla-ceramic-mural.html. BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_9497BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_9496BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_9489BlogSculpture25%ReszdIMG_9488

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Jewel in the Crown : Tathra and Kianinny Bay

Tathra is a small coastal township (population 1622) on the Sapphire Coast and is one of our favourite spots! It has the closest beach to Bega and is situated between Merimbula, 25 km to the south and Bermagui, 44 km to the north. It is 446 km south of Sydney via the Princes Highway and sits high on a bluff, overlooking its famous wharf. The 3rd and 4th photos show the view north to Wajurda Point and Moon Bay.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-05-10 09.02.10
Tathra Headland
BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-06-14 11.59.45
Historic Tathra Wharf
BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-05-10 09.17.59
Kingdom of the Sea Eagle
BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.57.55
View to the north from Tathra: All part of Mimosa Rocks National Park

The area has a rich aboriginal history, which I will cover in next week’s post (A Slice of History), due to its abundant land and sea food resources. The name ‘Tathra’ means ‘beautiful country’ in the local Yuin dialect, though other sources suggest it has a  slightly different meaning : ‘place of wild cats’!!!

The first Europeans in the area settled to the west of Tathra, illegally squatting on Crown Land in the 1820s and 1830s. At that stage, the area was outside the limits of legal settlement, known as ‘the 19 Counties’. See : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteen_Counties for more information. This rich dairying country is regularly flooded and teams with birdlife, especially water birds. Apparently, in the 1971 Bega Valley flood, water covered the 45 foot telegraph poles all the way along the mile long flat!

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-08-11 16.58.48
Dairy flats at Jellat Jellat
BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.31.28
Extensive waterways and home of Bird Route No. 1
BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5096
Recent flooding this year

An enquiry into transport facilities in the Bega area in 1851 led to the formation of the Illawarra  Steam Navigation Company in 1858. It was an amalgamation of smaller steamer services along the South coast : the Kiama Steam Navigation Company and vessels of the Twofold Bay Pastoral Association and Edye Manning’s fleet. The name was changed in 1904 to the Illawarra and South Coast Steam Navigation Company. The first cargo vessel, a 50 ton sailboat called ‘Vision’, arrived in Tathra that same year and moored offshore, its cargo being transported on a small boat to Kangarutha, where a store shed was erected at a small anchorage, ‘Stockyards’, later that year.

Tathra started out as a small jetty, known as the ‘Farmers’ Sea Wharf’. It was a shipping outlet for a group of local farmers, led by Daniel Gowing, who were fed up with having to transport their produce to Merimbula 25 km away, especially as the wagons often had to wait for the tide to go out when they crossed the beach at Bournda. Daniel Gowing was a farmer from Jellat Jellat, who opened the first store in Tathra for produce to be shipped soon after from Kangarutha.

In 1860, it was decided that Kianinny Bay was more sheltered for loading than Kangarutha, so a store was built at Kianinny. Cargo was still shipped from the beach by small boats to vessels, like ‘Gipsy’, ‘Ellen’, ‘You Yangs’ and ‘John Penn’, moored in the bay. Bad weather often held up the produce wagons on their way to the boats, so loading was uncertain and the freight costs high.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.33.35
Kianinny Bay today

Tathra township was surveyed in 1861 and that same year, the jetty was replaced by a wharf, funded by donations from local farmers and The Illawarra and South Coast Steam Navigation Company. Regular shipping commenced in 1862 with PS Mimosa being the first ship to moor. The wharf was designed by prominent colonial engineer, Ernest Orpen Moriarty, and built by R. Mowatt with the help of Daniel Gowing and John Kirkwood. Turpentine logs, from the North Coast, driven into solid rock. It was sited in its current location, due to the protection from southerly winds, though the northerly waves still caused enough damage to necessitate continual repairs, including re-piling and changing the location of the piles, as piling techniques improved. The steep road down to the wharf also caused problems, requiring extra teams of animals to haul the fully-laden carts back up the hill.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 15.23.37
The wharf from Tathra Beach

With the opening up of Crown Lands to free selection in 1861, the population rapidly expanded and the increased trade was reflected in major additions to the original wharf. A cargo shed was built in 1866. In 1868, the Bega-Tathra road was cleared to a width of one chain and in 1879, Tathra opened its first post office in Gowing’s Store, a general store and guesthouse, on the corner of the main road and the road down to the wharf.

Due to the expansion of  shipping needs and the increase in the size of visiting ships and depth of moorings, major extensions to the wharf were made in 1873; 1878; 1886; 1889; 1903 and 1912, under the guiding hand of another well-known colonial engineer, Ernest Macartney de Burgh. In 1901, cattle and pig yards were built. The route between Tathra and Sydney became known as ‘the Pig and Whistle Line’, due to the transport of pigs, produce and passengers between the two locations. Apparently, as the boats rounded the corner, they would always blow a whistle and the pigs would start squealing!

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.16

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5538
View south from ‘Pig and Whistle Lookout’ on Tathra Headland to the point

In 1862, the Illawarra Steamship Company fleet consisted of 3 schooners : ‘Ellen’, ‘Gipsy’ and ‘Rosebud’; a clipper : ‘White Cloud’; and 3 steamers: a paddle steamer : ‘Hunter’ and 2 screw steamers : ‘John Penn’ and ‘Kameruka’, but the sailing ships were superseded by steamers after 1881.

The steamer service was crucial to the Far South Coast, as the roads were very poor and there was no railway service. The Princes Highway from Batemans Bay to the Victorian border was gravel up until the 1940s. Consequently, there was a chain of 15 reliable all-weather wharves up and down the coast, where the steamers would berth and deliver and pick up goods and passengers. Rixon’s wagon left Bega Post Office for Merimbula every Wednesday and Tathra on Mondays and Thursdays to take mail and passengers to and from the steamer. Produce from Tathra included : bacon, cheese, butter, timber, tallow, wattle bark, corn and wool. The boats would also carry prime beef and sheep, horses, pigs, poultry and turkeys, both for the Sydney markets and the Royal Easter Sydney Show. Mobs of up to 700 pigs would be walked to the wharf from local farms. One Bemboka farmer even walked her flock of turkeys over 50km to the wharf by coating her turkey’s feet in tar with a light dusting of sand! Ships arriving from Sydney brought tea, bags of flour and sugar, biscuits, farm machinery and parts, grains and seeds and household furniture.BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.34.38In 1907, the buildings were reconstructed and the present two-storey structure was built. Spring-loaded wrought iron buffers were introduced to assist the berthing of larger vessels in the difficult north-eastern seas. A mooring buoy was positioned north-east of the wharf, to which ships would attach a spring line. Between 1907 and 1912, there were more major extensions, including a subdeck; a jib crane to facilitate loading; a cattle race; a loading ramp and a passenger shelter. In 1914, soldiers and horses were farewelled from the wharf on their way to fight in the Great War. Here is an old photo of the volunteers leaving for the war, as seen on the noticeboard on Tathra Headland.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5533The increase in transport by road had a major effect on the amount of shipping trade everywhere, but because the Far South Coast had no adjacent railway line to carry bulk freight to Sydney, shipping trade lingered on till 1954. By 1919, the number of passengers travelling by sea had greatly decreased, so the passenger shelter was replaced by a single storey shed, next to the two-storey building. Freight and cargo became the predominant trade from Tathra. During World War II, enemy activity off the Far South Coast of NSW, including German mines and Japanese submarines, had a further impact on the amount of trading. The last ship to work cargo was the 1929 SS Cobargo in 1954 and the even older SS Bergalia was the last steamer to visit the wharf later that year to remove valuable items of wharf equipment. The Illawarra and South Coast Steam Navigation Company suspended trading in 1958.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5522BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5518Gradually, the wharf structure fell into disrepair and became unsafe, so a demolition order was issued in 1973. Fortunately, an active local group and National Trust banded together to oppose the demolition. The Tathra Wharf Trust was formed in 1977 and launched an appeal for the conservation and preservation of the old wharf. By 1982, only minor parts of the wharf, the mezzanine deck and a few of the more recent buildings had been demolished. The decking was replaced and the two-storey building was restored, the top storey becoming the Tathra Maritime Museum, dedicated to steamer history, and the bottom storey being used for a cafe and tourist outlet.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.36BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.44BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5523Between 1982 and 2010, road access was  difficult, as one leg of the access loop road was closed by boulders after heavy seas smashed over the headland.These photos show the old road.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.56.55BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.55.32BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 13.55.16BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.57.35It is now the only coastal steamer wharf left on the NSW coast and 1 of only 6 timber wharves still listed for preservation on the Register of the National Estate, as well as the NSW State Heritage Register. It is such a beautiful old building with chunky solid wooden beams and spectacular views and it is a wonderful reminder of our shipping past. The cafe is so impressive and provides top-quality meals, which are beautifully presented. It is also a great venue for selling local arts and crafts – we have some highly creative artists and artisans in the area.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-04-10 14.41.49BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.38BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-05-01 14.36.12

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.31.50
Delicious Spiced Chai!

The wharf is also very popular with anglers, as well as seabirds!BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-04-10 15.04.28BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 13.09.34BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-05-01 14.28.05-1BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.34.40BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.33.44BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.35.04BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.47.37BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 13.14.01Tathra Beach has been a tourist destination from very early days. It is 3 km long and stretches from the wharf and Tathra Headland in the south to Moogareeka Inlet and the mouth of the Bega River to the north. It is protected from the Southerlies by the steep headland. Beach fishing yields :

  • Salmon, tailor and gummy shark – caught with pilchards, fresh fish fillets and stripy tuna;
  • Bream, whiting and mullet – using beach worms, pippies, prawns and fresh nippers as bait;    and
  • Sand whiting – caught using sand worms and nippers.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 13.34.05BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 14.16.44

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.24
Looking from Tathra Wharf back to Tathra Beach

It is a great spot for swimming with the Tathra Surf Club (formed in 1909) patrolling the beach every weekend from October to April, as well as Christmas Holidays and Public Holidays. Sail boarding, surfing and snorkelling off the wharf are also popular activities. It has been voted one of the cleanest beaches in NSW, which is not surprising, given the progressive and forward-thinking spirit of environmentally aware locals, who are establishing a solar farm in Tathra. See : http://cleanenergyforeternity.net.au/. Another very active local organization is the local volunteer fire brigade, which was established in 1945, with a 2nd new fire station built next-door in 2011. It is one of the most well-equipped fire brigades on the Far South Coast.BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.28.57BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-02-22 12.13.14

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 15.28.38
When full, the blue water drum at the top tips its contents onto unsuspecting kids below!

Another tourism drawcard for Tathra is its proximity to 2 wonderful National Parks : Bournda National Park in the south with 13 km of unspoilt coastline and Mimosa Rocks National Park in the north, which extends for 16 km. I shall be discussing Moogareeka Inlet, Ford Headland and Moon Bay, all within the southernmost section of Mimosa Rocks National Park and 4 km north of Tathra, in a separate post next week (A Slice of History), but will focus now instead on the spectacular Kianinny Bay, just to the south of Tathra.

Kianinny Bay is a protected bay with immediate access to the ocean. It is sheltered from Northerly winds and is an incredibly beautiful spot in all weathers, as seen in these photos taken from Chamberlain Lookout above.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-02-22 13.38.51BlogTathraJewelCrown 80%Reszd2015-01-26 21.28.51 - CopyThe coastline between Tathra Headland and Kianinny Bay includes steep cliffs and rugged rock masses, providing wonderful opportunities for rock fishing, using cunjevoi, abalone guts and cabbage weed to catch Black Drummer, Silver Drummer, Leatherjacket, Groper, Luderick and Banded Morwong all year round. From December to May, Bunito, Kingfish, Tailor and Salmon can be caught with live baits.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 14.26.35BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-04-10 14.36.47BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.46.21Tathra really is a fisherman’s paradise with its beach and rock fishing, reef and bottom fishing and estuary fishing, as well as all the freshwater streams and dams. The closest reef section is 6 km south of Tathra, 800 m out from White Rock and extending several kilometres out. Fish caught here include : Snapper, Morwong, Flathead, Leatherjacket and Gummy Shark. We found this flathead in a rock pool left high and dry on White Rock after the tide receded – a very easy catch (though we didn’t!)BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%ReszdIMG_2149BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%ReszdIMG_2146Boats leave Kianinny Bay to drift fish the outskirts of Tathra Bay, catching Sand Flathead and Tiger Flathead, using flesh baits and plastic jigs, and Gunnards and Gummy Sharks. Little wonder that Kianinny Bay is home to the Tathra Fishing Club. There are excellent boat launching facilities : a concrete boat ramp for vessels up to 7 m long; plenty of parking; areas to wash down the boats and tables to clean the fish, as well as a BBQ and picnic area and playground. Sting Rays regularly cruise up and down the shallows, competing for fish scraps with the local sea gulls and cormorants, and can be a little disconcerting for swimmers! Snorkelling and spear fishing are also popular. These photos show a very relaxed swimmer, two very large, friendly sting rays and a sea hare.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.31.21BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.30.48BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 14.26.02Kianinny Bay forms the north-eastern tip of Bournda National Park and is the starting off point for the 9 km long Kangarutha Track, south through cliffs, rock debris and small inlets to Turingal Head. See : http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/Walking-tracks/Kangarutha-walking-track. I will be covering this national park and walking track in a later post. It is a beautiful walk with fabulous coastal views and plenty of bird and animal life, as well as interesting vegetation. I will finish with photos of a Golden Whistler on Tathra Headland, some stunning feral vegetation and a very street-wise local resident!BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%Reszdaug 2010 592BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%Reszdaug 2010 595BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.11.37

For an explanation, see : https://candeloblooms.com/2015/10/13/birthday-blessings/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sapphire Dreaming

The Far South Coast of NSW, from Bermagui to Eden, is known as the Sapphire Coast and it is easy to see why, when you view that blue, blue sea with rolling green farmland running straight down to the beach and discover hidden gems like Hidden Valley, which lies just to the north of Bunga Head and Aragunnu, which I covered in a previous post ‘Summer Dreaming’, and which is also part of Mimosa Rocks National Park.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.24.44This magical stretch of coastline from Goalen Head in the north to Bunga Head in the south, can be accessed via Hergenhans Rd, 2.8 km off the Tathra-Bermagui Rd. We first visited this area last May and were blown away by the spectacular beauty of the place. The track through the paddock leads down to Bunga Beach and a small creek, which leads back to Bunga Lagoon.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.39.36BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.40.49BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8742BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.45.48Across the creek is a large rocky outcrop, which serves as a wonderful vantage point from which to plan your explorations. To the north, Goalen Head (1st and 2nd photo below) and the south, Bunga Head (3rd and 4th photo below).BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.49.54BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.50.14BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.50.43BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.46.19We  started by walking down Bunga Beach South to Hidden Valley and Bunga Head, then returned along an old farm track to Bunga Beach North and Goalen Head.

Bunga Beach South is a sandy beach 1.3km long, and is a breeding site of Hooded Plovers (Thinornis rubricollis). We saw a National Park sign the other day, which said there were less than 50 Hooded Plovers left in NSW! Here are a few photos of our journey down the beach. The rocks and their weathering patterns were amazing!BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.16.34BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.14.04BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.16.10BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.14.41BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.13.38BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.17.01BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.19.41BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.23.54BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.29.40BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.36.32BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.42.07The Southern end of the beach is 370m long and  has a small creek at its northern end, which feeds into Hidden Valley. Bunga Head lies to the south with its hexagonal columns and dramatic cliffs.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.59.00BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.49.11BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.50.09BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.54.59BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 12.51.39Hidden Valley is well-named, as it is tucked in behind the northern side of Bunga Head and can only be accessed on foot via an old farm track through regenerating bushland from the Bunga South car park at the end of Hergenhans Rd or via Bunga Beach South. There is an informal old track (3km) over the 127m high Bunga Head, but it is not easy to find and is not promoted by NPWS, due to cultural sensitivitiesBlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 13.01.06BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 13.09.47Hidden Valley was an old farm and its old sheds, toilet and rainwater tank still remain. Past clearing, grazing, fencing and the establishment of exotic pastures, earthen dams and vehicle tracks have destroyed much of the natural ecology and left the area with weeds like Kikuyu, fireweed, blackberries and Arum lilies.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 13.04.11BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 13.06.56The 105 ha property was gazetted in 1994 under the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme, which was established by the NSW Government in 1973 to purchase coastal freehold properties with significant cultural or natural heritage values. Gradually, the area is being revegetated by native coastal banksias (photo above) and coast wattles. There are also a few remnant Forest Red Gums (Eucalyptus tereticornis ), which used to cover much of the area originally, and a few Cabbage Palms (Livistona australis), representing this species’ southernmost limit in NSW.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 13.07.43BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 13.31.11We are really looking forward to camping here in Summer. There is a large grassed area and a wood barbecue and the beach below is 250m wide and protected by both headlands from the southerly and northerly winds. Apparently, you can catch bream, flathead, salmon, mulloway and gummy sharks.

After taking the inland route back to our starting point, we then set out to explore Bunga Beach North and Goalen Head.

Bunga Beach North is 200m long and has a cleared grassy slope behind and a rocky reef in the centre. It too has black rounded volcanic boulders. The small creek, which leads to Bunga Lagoon, is usually blocked at its mouth, unless there has been good rain. Bunga Lagoon is home to many local and visiting birds.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.45.07BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8795Goalen Head is composed of highly folded and faulted sedimentary rocks like slate, siltstone, shale and greywacke laid down during the Ordovician Period (which was 430-490 Million years ago). During this time, volcanic gabbro rock intruded into the sedimentary layers.The aborigines used the gabbro for tool production.BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8747BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.44.12BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8748BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8788Today, this gabbro is covered by deep fertile well-drained chocolate soils on the crests and slopes, well-drained loams near bedrock outcrops and poorly drained black earth in the drainage lines.

The original native vegetation communities are thought to have included :

  • Bega Dry Grass Forest
  • Coastal Scrub
  • Bunga Head Rain Forest
  • Coastal Warm Temperate Rainforest
  • Dune Dry Shrub Forest and
  • Coastal Foothills Dry Shrub Forest.

Sadly, none of these original communities remain, due to extensive clearing and grazing, though there are still some remnant Forest Red Gums (Eucalyptus tereticornis). Regrowth thickets of Coastal Banksia and Coast Wattle are reestablishing along the seaward edge of the headland, but the area is predominantly grassy : dense swards of Themeda Grassland, dominated by Kangaroo Grass (Themeda australis) and introduced Kikuyu Grass (Pennisetum clandenstinum). This grassland is highly disturbed, but still significant, due to the restricted distribution of this community in the region.BlogSapphire dreamg20%Reszd2015-05-05 11.43.50BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8750We have seen many kangaroos grazing (top photo above), but apparently the Eastern Ground Parrot also feeds on the Goalen Head Grasslands, as do rabbits and the odd deer. There are also numerous weeds including fireweed, blackberry, sea spurge and sea rocket.

Goalen Head was also an old property, which was purchased under the Coastal Lands Protection Scheme. The 104 ha farm (Murrah, Goalen Head) was gazetted in 2001 and added a further 3km of coastline to the National Park.BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8786BlogSapphire dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8782From the headland, there are excellent views north to Murrah Beach ( 1st photo above) and south to Bunga Head (2nd photo above). Murrah Beach is 12 km south of Bermagui, but has very difficult access, due to the closure of the road by the owners of the private property, through which it passes. It backs onto Murrah Lagoon, a 110 ha body of shallow water, fed by the Murrah River, and has much bird life and fish, including bream, whiting, flathead, redfin, leatherjackets, mulloway and the odd gummy shark. It sounds like a really interesting spot to explore, but the only access appears to be by walking north along the coast from Goalen Head. We started to attempt this on our second visit to the area, but it is quite a long walk and really requires a whole day itself. Another hidden treasure, another day, another story …!!!

PS. The featured image on this post was a pod of more than 20 dolphins off Goalen Head.BlogBdayblessgs40%ReszdIMG_8771

 

Summer Dreaming

This week, we visited Nethercote Falls, but because we will be revisiting this amazing area in late October to photograph the blooms of Rock Orchids on the cliffs, I will delay this particular post and introduce you to another of our favourite coastal beauty spots : Aragunnu and Bunga Head.Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 12.38.22Aragunnu and Bunga Head are both part of Mimosa Rocks National Park and are accessed off the coastal road half way between Tathra and Bermagui. It is a stunningly beautiful area with much variety and interest for the natural history enthusiast, as well as being popular with fishermen, divers and campers.

Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2926Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.22.03

These photos are of the National Park boards on site.

The Mimosa Rocks National Park Management Plan can be found here : http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/resources/planmanagement/final/20110246MimosaRocksNPfinal.pdf, but for now, here is a brief description :Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2877Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2882The geology underlying Mimosa Rocks National Park is very old. Sedimentary rocks like slate, siltstone, shale and greywacke were laid down during the Ordovician Period (430-490 Million years ago), then later  subjected to much folding and faulting, during which time they metamorphosed. These old sedimentary layers have been exposed by wave action and can be seen on the flat rock platforms jutting out into the sea.

More sediments were laid down during the Devonian period (355-410 Million years ago) and at low tide, Devonian fish fossils can be seen in the black mudrock, including some of the earliest known shark fossils. The fossil record also includes some of the earliest known club mosses and other rainforest flora. Unfortunately, I don’t have photos for these fossils, but here is some of the amazing rock !!!Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2890Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2869

During this time, rhyolite ( a viscous sticky form of lava, which flows very slowly ) was extruded over the old sedimentary rocks to a depth of over 140m to produce the columnar (hexagonal) jointing of Bunga Head and the volcanic sea stack castles of Mimosa Rocks.Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-08-20 13.54.16Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 12.11.45Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 12.07.48Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.24.06
Poorly consolidated sediments like gravels, sands and clays were also deposited during the Tertiary and Quaternary periods (the last 65 Million years). Wave action has undercut them to produce gravel beds of water-worn round pebbles of quartz and quartzite. The ‘coffee rock’ found at Aragunnu is such an example and is an eroded podzol which has been hardened by humic groundwater.Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8965Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8964Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.26.58Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.42.36Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.27.36Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 14.28.08The sandy beach at Aragunnu provides a complete contrast to the pebbly beaches and rocky cliffs of Bunga Head. Behind the sand dunes of Aragunnu, Dune Dry Shrub Forest,  dominated by Bangalay (E. botryoides), also contains :
• Coast Banksia (Banksia integrifolia),
• Saw Banksia (Banksia serrata)
• Tree Broom-Heath (Monotoca elliptica),
• Pine Heath(Astroloma pinifolium)
• Burrawangs (Macrozamia communis), and
• a groundcover of Bracken (Pteridium esculentum), grasses, sedges and forbs.Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2802Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2786Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2931Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2805 The Bunga Head Littoral Rainforest (7Ha) contains a low canopy (less than 10m tall) of:
• Lilly pilly (Acmena smithii),
• Rusty Fig (Ficus rubiginosa),
• Sweet Pittosporum (Pittosporum undulatum) and
• Kurrajong (Brachychiton populneus), as well as
• Bangalay (Eucalyptus botryoides).
The rainforest understorey includes large shrubs of Beyeria lasiocarpa, copper laurel (Eupomatia laurina) and large mock-olive (Notelaea longifolia), and a diverse range of vines, sedges and grasses. The top photo shows a Birds Nest Fern on the left and Burrawangs on the right. The bottom photo is of an Elkhorn Fern. Both the Elkhorn Fern and Birds Nest Fern are at their southernmost geographical limit.Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8971Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9024
The rhyolite ridges of Bunga Head support 30m tall messmates and silvertop ash, as well as populations of the vulnerable Chef’s Hat Correa (Correa baeuerlenii), the rare plant Myoporum bateae, the uncommon yellow wood (Acronychia oblongifolia) and Zieria sp, and an unusual community of Port Jackson Pines (Callitris rhomboidea)  and melaleucas,  mixed with orchids. These photos show the Chef’s Hat Correa at the top and a Rock Orchid below.Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9021Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9023Mimosa Rocks National Park is in a climatic transition zone between Subtropical and Warm and Cool Temperate floras. Bunga Head and Aragunnu are the southernmost limit of many remnant rainforest species, including :
• Sassafras (Doryphora sassafras),
• Small-Leaved Fig (Ficus obliqua),
• Scentless rosewood (Synoum glandulosum),
• Koda (Ehretia acuminata),
• Brittlewood(Claoxylon australe),
• Pointed Boobialla (Myoporum acuminatum),
• Large Mock Olive (Notelaea longifolia),
• Orange Thorn (Citriobatus pauciflora),
• Sweet Sarsaparilla (Smilaxglyciphylla),
• Elk Horn (Platycerium bifurcatum),
• Birds Nest Fern (Asplenium australasicum) and
• Climbing Fishbone Fern (Nephrolepis sp).Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9061Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9071I loved the tangled roots and vines in this Fig forest out on one of the rocky headlands.

The wide range of vegetation types provide habitats for :
• 39 species of mammals
• 115 bird species
• 21 reptile species and
• 12 amphibian speciesBlog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9074Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2936It is worth consulting the Management Plan, especially Appendix 2 : Threatened Animal Species for a complete listing. There are 3 endangered animal species :

• Swift Parrot (Lathamus discolor)
• Hooded Plover (Thinornis rubricollis)
• Little Tern (Sterna albifrons)

The top photo is of two delightful little Hooded Plovers on Aragunnu Beach, where they breed from August to March. The bottom photo is of Crested Terns and a Silver Gull.2015-06-22 14.25.14 - CopyBlog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2811

There are also 20 vulnerable species including :

• Pied Oystercatcher (Haematopus longirostris)
• Powerful Owl (Ninox strenua),
• Masked Owl (Tyto novaehollandiae),
• Sooty Owl (Tyto tenebricosa),
• Square-tailed Kite (Lophoictinia isura),
• Osprey (Pandion haliaetus),
• Gang Gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum),
• Glossy Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami) and
• Brown Treecreeper (Climacteris picumnus)

The first photo shows a pair of Pied Oyster Catchers with a pair of Hooded Plovers, both Threatened Animal Species, which breed at Aragunnu Beach. I love the bottom image of a pair of Pied Oyster Catchers. They are monogamous birds, which lay their eggs from Spring to Early Summer.Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 14.13.22Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 14.15.42Mimosa Rocks National Park is also the southernmost limit for :
• Topknot Pigeon (Lopholaimus antarcticus),
• Brown Pigeon (Macrophygia amboinensis)
• Yellow-throated Scrubwren (Sericornis citreogularis) and
• Variegated Wren (Malurus assimimis).

Before the arrival of Europeans in 1788, the area was occupied by the Dhurga-speaking Djiringanj tribe, one of the 3 groups of the Yuin people, who lived between the Shoalhaven River and Cape Howe, on the Victorian border, for the last 20,000 years. The Djiringang occupied the area from Narooma, south to Bega and west to the top of the range. Food was plentiful and included : fish, shellfish, stranded whales, dolphins, seals, crabs, freshwater eels, birds and their eggs, fruits, seeds, tubers, honey, mammals, lizards and grubs. Cycad (Burrawang) nuts were soaked to remove their toxins, then ground into a starchy flour, which was made into damper. These photos show the huge Cycad cones, which break open to reveal these stunning bright red seeds.Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-03-08 12.49.28Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-03-08 12.50.43The rhyolite pebble and veins of quartz provided stone for tool production and the forests had plenty of material for weapons, utensils, shelters, decoration and ceremonial purposes. The photos below show a huge aboriginal midden in the foreground. Not a bad view for a feast !!Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2899Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2898The Yuin had rich social and ceremonial lives. Groups traveled through the Far South Coast and inland over the Monaro Tableland following ancient songlines. There is an old track over Bunga Head north to Hidden Valley, another little gem. They had sophisticated exchange patterns and large ceremonial gatherings. The park has a number of important ceremonial and mythological sites of spiritual value to the local aboriginals, including middens and artifact scatters, most of which are date to 6000 years old after the last rise in sea levels.

Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.34.13Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.34.38I loved the artistic work on these interpretive boards provided by National Parks.

Aragunnu was an important spiritual place for aboriginal women , who used it as a place to give birth. It is easy to imagine aboriginal children playing in among the rocks and the shallows at the end of this beautiful beach. While we were visiting, a raven flew down to check on us and I like to think that it might carry the spirit of some former aboriginal woman.

Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2796Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2792European settlement started in the 1830s with the arrival of timber loggers, then farmers and graziers. There were no roads and most travel was by coastal steamer from the 1850s on. Spotted gum and stringybark logged in the 1950s and 1960s were a mainstay of  the Sydney boat building industry, as well as being used to build bridges and wharves in Fiji and India. With increasing shipping came the increased risk of shipwreck and in 1863, a paddle steamer called ‘Mimosa Rocks’, which was traveling from Twofold Bay to Sydney, hit uncharted rocks off Bunga Head and sank. It has been commemorated, not only with the name of the rocks themselves, but also the name of the entire National Park, which was gazetted in 1973. The photos below show the site of the shipwreck and some old wreakage off Aragunnu Beach.Blog Summer dreamg20%Reszd2015-06-22 11.39.56Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2841The area has 50 campsites and we are looking forward to the warmer weather , so we can spend a few days there. We have visited the area on three day-trips now and each time we discover new treasures including these amazing pagoda formations, shown below ! Whether they are a reflection of the spiritual nature of the area, a form of artistic expression or merely a need to record a visit, their layout is constantly changing due to the action of waves and weathering. Its fun finding them all!Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9000Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9013Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_8998Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_2906Blog Summer dreamg20%ReszdIMG_9001