Favourite Private Specialty Gardens : Part 2 : Dry Climate, Sustainable and Small Gardens

The Millenium Drought in Australia from 1995 to 2009 had a massive impact on Australian gardens, resulting in the adoption of a more appropriate style of garden design for our dry climate, especially given the future effects of climate change. These gardens are predominantly made up of low water use plants, which are adapted to drought, many of which are sold by Lambleys Nursery. See: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/03/08/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-nursery-gardens-in-victoria and http://lambley.com.au/. I have already discussed a perfect example of a Mediterranean Garden, Lixouri, in October’s post. See: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/09/20/favourite-private-country-gardens-part-2/.

Dry Climate and Mediterranean Gardens

Bedrock

141 Karoonda Highway (on Bookpurnong Tce), Loxton, South Australia   2.5 acres         Ph: 0427213322  BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.29.46BlogPrivSpec25%Reszd2014-10-26 10.43.07Once a quarry and the old drive-in site, Bedrock is situated in Loxton, 250 km east of Adelaide. Loxton is known as the ‘Garden Town of the Riverland’, due to its position on the Murray River, and has many low water usage, sustainable landscapes. We visited it in late October 2014 as part of the Renmark Rose Festival.

Bedrock is a magnificent grand scale garden with a tropical lush feel. BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.43.51Chris and Raelene Schultz developed the garden from scratch, when they bought the old drive-in site back in 2000. Hundreds of tonnes of rock and stone were used to build retaining walls and edgings, as well as a rustic stone cottage (2014) for accommodation and small functions.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.44.38 Recycled materials from the 1850s were used in the latter, which complements the 1923 weeping mulberry and their grandmother’s 40 year old roses.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.32.35BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.32.19 There is a pond with a cascading waterfall and waterlilies;BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.44.09BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.43.16 a beautiful wisteria-covered arbour;BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.45.23 and a sunken iris garden with an urn water feature.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.31.22BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.49.31BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.49.16BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.48.23BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.31.39Everything about this garden is dramatic and bold from the entrance sign to colourful pansy and ranunculus beds and the dry creek bed and stone wall feature.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.45.43BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.44.28BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.35.32BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.30.25BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.32.55BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.32.00BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.31.26 There are native plantings, a fruit orchard, trees and annuals and lots of quirky locally-made animal sculptures. It will be interesting to see this relatively new garden in a few years’ time.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.32.50BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-10-26 10.33.16Hill House

26-30 City View Drive, Wandana Heights, Geelong, VIC   0.4 ha (1 acre)

This is a much older garden (25 years old) on the top of the hill in Geelong, with panoramic views over the city and Port Philip Bay to the You Yangs and Melbourne.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2131BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2161 Originally a 90 year old windbreak plantation, the garden is built on a series of terraces, linked by curved hedges and stone walls.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2136BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2121BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2219 Entry is via a gatehouse structure with a shingle roof, which came from the rotunda building of the original Ceres Lookout.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2272BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2120 Recycled materials have been used extensively throughout the garden from the walls made of railway sleepers, salvaged from the South Geelong Railway renovations, and the petrified timber slab, excavated from a local quarry, under a metal tree in the south-west corner to the use of Japanese bath tubs and North Indian well buckets as plant containers and the retired band instruments hanging in the trees.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2146BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2181BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2149BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2228BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2138BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2203 This eclectic and whimsical garden has so many wonderful design ideas, which can be adapted to small gardens, courtyards and dry, shady areas.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2216BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2118BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2226BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2130BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2265BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2207 The use of Tuscan toppings, instead of lawn, saves water. Steel baskets of orchids are supported on the original pylons of the Portarlington Pier beneath the photinia hedge, while a storm-damaged cypress is used as a base for a metal flame sculpture.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2168BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2143BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2256BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2190 Other trees include: salvaged Red Gums (350 years old) on the eastern and western boundaries; Conifers; Gleditsia ‘Ruby Lace’ trees; Bottle Trees; pollarded, standardized Catalpa trees (ball-like canopy), Crepe Myrtles, Maple collections, Fiddlewoods and many palms.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2267BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2133 Bromeliads grow in the shady sheltered southern part of the garden, along with azaleas, while roses prefer the sunnier sites.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2222BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2155 There are many many pots, as well as original sculptures, and lots of unusual succulents including this strange Elephant’s Foot, Dioscorea elephantipes, which can live to 70 years old, shown in the bottom photo below.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2245BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2214BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2164BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2221BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_2258

Meanderings

62 Kennedy St, Castlemaine, VIC  Ph (03) 5472 4202    0.25 acres

A much smaller garden in Castlemaine, Central Victoria, an area renowned for its tough climate with extreme temperatures, heavy frost and low rainfall, as well as depleted soil from goldmining days. The garden was created by Barbara Maund in 1991 and was inspired by the English Arts and Crafts Movement, as well as medieval monastery gardens. The only plants from the pre-1991 garden were a 100 year old box hedge, a large mauve lilac, a nandina thicket and belladonna lilies. The garden was started around the 1895 Victorian stucco house and is semi-formal in nature. The design displays strong structural elements from the geometric garden rooms to the hedges and topiaried plant forms (circles, arcs, balls, domes, squares and rectangles), but is softened by a patchwork of self-sown annuals, perennials and blowsy old-fashioned roses, as well as the creeping thyme along the brick paths.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 394BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 398 Local landscaping materials were  used : gravel in the paths between different garden sections; old bricks contain garden compartments and create a series of circles, a shallow round pool (to reflect the moon) and the well; stone is used for stepping stones and paving; and slate for mulch , as well as iron and other recycled materials.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 396BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 397BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 405BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 401BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 408BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 419BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 406BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 412 Plants were chosen for their toughness and include perennials, succulents, iris, seasonal bulbs, roses and self-seeding plants. Many of the aromatic plants are Mediterranean in origin : lavenders, thymes and rosemary, as well as silvery artemesia, santolina and lambs’ ear, Stachys byzantinia. Very much a collector’s garden, there are 37 fragrant Heritage roses, fruit trees and over 70 self-seeding plants, all in one quarter of an acre!BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 409BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 413 There are many different colour themes from the purple driveway tunnel and northern yellow borders to the central blue walk and circle and the white southern beds.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 415BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 411I loved the bright red berries of the pyracantha, trained along wires the length of the verandah and complimented by red begonias and white wooden stars.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 410 The topiary of the Australian map outside the old shed and the square box were very impressive.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 403BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 404BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 421 There were also lots of seats in the sun, shade and shelter, from which to admire the many vistas. In late Spring, the plants are treated to home-made compost and leaf mould, while blood and bone is applied in March and August. The plants are self-mulched with clippings year round. Watering is done by hand, using water from rainwater tanks and a grey water system.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 417BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 418BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 414When we visited Meanderings through the Australian Open Garden scheme back in April 2010, it was owned by Larraine and Jim Kollmorgen, but it has since been sold in 2014.

Coastal environments are also tough for gardeners with the salt-laden winds and sandy soils. I have already described Villa Lettisier, which protects its garden from the coastal winds coming straight off Bass Strait with huge hedges. See: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/09/20/favourite-private-country-gardens-part-2/. Corio Bay is much more sheltered, but still presents challenges to gardeners with strong winds, low rainfall and alkaline soil. We visited the next two gardens on the Bellarine Peninsula on the shores of Corio Bay near Geelong on the Cottage By the Sea Inc Open Day in March 2014. For the 2016 program, see: http://cottagebythesea.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/GARDENDAY2016.pdf

Seaview

965 Portarlington Rd., Curlewis, VIC BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.25.02A beautiful coastal country garden developed from an empty paddock back in 2000 around a newly built house. Right on the shores of Corio Bay, the property has superb views of the You Yangs.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.15.22BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.20.38 While the house was being built, native trees were planted on the south-west corner of the garden to protect it from the prevailing winds.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.24.11BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.23.16 In 2001, a lawn of Santa Ana couch was laid down- a perfect choice, as it does not require watering. The  large east-west garden bed was the first to be planted. I loved the vegetable garden.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.17.06BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.17.17 An original dam was converted to a small lake with rocks and plantings. A 35m deep bore was sunk in January 2007, its water feeding into the dam.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.06.26BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.05.58BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.05.04BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.07.35BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.07.44BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.09.46 Drought-tolerant plants, suited to coastal environments, were chosen and include : a rosemary hedge; a white cedar underplanted with flaxes and grasses; a Chinese elm to provide shade near the dam; an oleaster hedge on the southern fence, planted 2003 ;BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.03.05BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.21.54BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.23.37BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.12.21BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.13.39BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.03.48 And a succulent garden, planted mainly from cuttings in 2010.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.01.18BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.01.29 There were also lots of interesting sculptures and wire work on display and for sale.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.10.48BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.16.00BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.29.52BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.08.29BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.08.48BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 10.13.48 Brambledale Farm

2115 Portarlington Rd., Drysdale, VIC

Bought by Elizabeth Vorrath in 1972, Brambledale Farm is a working farm, named after the original late 1800s cottage, which fell into disrepair and was demolished in 2009. Originally running sheep and growing crops and potatoes, the owners now agist horses and fatten cattle.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.23.22  A new house was built in 1974, with extensions in 1998.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.28.05 A stand of Tuart Gums protects the house from the harsh south-westerly winds.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.46.23 John Patrick designed a circular driveway with a pond, now a dry river bed. A haha wall at the front allows for uninterrupted superb views of Corio Bay and the You Yangs.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.23.36BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.20.57BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.53.47BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.22.05BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.25.35BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.25.39 A tennis court area was built in 1998, incorporating a stand of Lemon-scented Gums and two oaks, planted in 1975, including a Golden Rain Tree. A retaining wall and wide steps leading up to the house were built in 2006.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.41.24BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.43.37BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.24.42 This is a large well-established garden with formal and informal areas and superb plantings and combinations of colour and texture.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.28.50BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.37.49BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.33.09BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.44.28BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.19.25BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.27.14 Since the Millenium Drought of the early 2000s, the garden was replanted with hardy plants with low water requirements including : grasses and succulents; echiums and sedums; euphorbias and heleniums; kniphofias; a variety of salvias, lavenders and other sun-loving perennials; and a ground cover of Chinese Star Jasmine.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.28.27BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.27.50BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.25.05BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.27.25 Gravel replaced lawns and a new gravel garden, inspired by Michael McCoy, was built in 2008. I loved the bright sunny colours of these heleniums.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.45.24BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.45.15BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.44.13BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.44.05 I also loved the abundance, colour and variety in this garden, discovering new plants like the Castor Oil plant, Ricinus communis (photos 1 and 2); Salvia mexicana ‘Limelight’ (photo 4) and Jack-in-the-Pulpit or Cobra Lily, Arisaema (photo 3).BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.29.09BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.29.19BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.23.54BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-04-06 12.28.16Attila Kapitany

1 Lough Court Rd, Narre Warren North, VIC   0.4 ha (1 acre)

http://www.homelife.com.au/gardening/garden-design/succulent-water-wise-garden

The ultimate dry climate garden, this dramatic succulent/cacti garden fully warrants its video footage, seen here at : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jyfWFVHHVw  and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T27q1Z6D4ko.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 641 Attila Kapitany bought this residential house block, overlooking an ornamental public lake, formerly a large farm dam, with his wife Michele back in late 2002. Attila has vast experience (over 30 years worth) growing  and marketing succulents and cacti. Once director of a family business of garden centres, including Paradisia, Australia’s largest succulent and cacti nursery (http://www.paradisia.com.au/), he was a President of the Cactus and Succulent Society of Australia for 10 years (http://www.australiansucculents.com/). He has written 15 books on succulents and cacti, including seven books, co-authored with Rudolf Schulz. His book, Australian Succulent Plants, describes 100 of the 400 Australian succulent species, including 60 new species. Below is his hand-drawn mud map from our visit in March 2010.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_0324This is a very impressive, steep garden, built on terraces with garden rooms linked by paths of granitic gravel and sand. The design developed organically, rather than having a master plan, and gives the illusion of rivers of plants flowing down to the lake.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 604The block is screened on three boundaries (top and sides) by a 3m cypress hedge of Cupressocyparis leylandii ‘Castlewellan Gold’, planted from 2002 to 2003, with the front of the block left clear for the lake view. There are two holes cut in the hedge for peepholes over the garden to the lake.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 607Water had to be carted by bucket in the first 12 months, then mains water was installed with five garden taps positioned around the perimeter. The hard, dry, impermeable, nutrient-deficient soil has been improved with loads of mulch and humus and semicircular banks of compost and soil have been created on the downside of each plant to collect water runoff from higher up the hill and prevent it from disappearing down to the dam.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 575BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 591 There are over 10 000 plants of 1000 species, all raised by Attila and Michele from seeds and cuttings, collected on their travels, except for the central Bottle Tree, Brachychiton rupestris.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 594BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 621

There are 30 species of bottle trees, raised from seed collected from their natural Queensland habitat; blue-grey yuccas and Dasylirion wheeleri, grown from seed collected from their habitat in the desert regions of the USA; architectural agaves, gymeas (spear lilies) and aloes;BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 590BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 601 a saltbush collection ;BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 577 colourful ground cover succulents like aeoniums and crassulas;BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 617BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 580BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 596BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 581BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 599BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 584BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 583 and plants with foliage colour and nectar -producing flowers (for birds, bees and butterflies).BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 630BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 627 Seventy percent of the plants are succulents, while the rest are natives. One fifth of the plants are native to Australia. There is such an eclectic mix of shapes, patterns, textures and colours.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 598BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 624

BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 612BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 614 Height is provided by the bottle trees, the spear lilies and the White Silk Floss tree, Ceiba insignis, as well as the vertical stone installations of the Ruins. These angular basalt rock pinnacles mimic the Lost City of Northern Territory, while a patch of rusty red sand in the centre of the garden represents the Red Centre of Australia.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 635BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 622BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 633 It is well worth visiting this amazing garden, which is at its peak in late Winter/ Spring! Be advised to stay on the path though, to avoid being stung, poisoned or falling down the slope into the dam!

BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 631BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 637BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 620BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmarchapril 602More information can be seen in a Garden Drum article ‘A Sucker for Succulents’ by Tim Entwhistle in 2013: http://gardendrum.com/2013/09/17/a-sucker-for-succulents/.

Barwon Heads

29-31 Bridge St., Barwon Heads, VIC    1128 m2

A much safer, much smaller garden, but equally fascinating in a totally different way !BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.52.23 Showcased during the Geelong Sustainable House Day in September 2014 for its retrofitting of a 1900s weatherboard beach house (including under deck water tanks between the house and the garage), it was the predominantly native garden around the old house, which really impressed us, especially as it had only been created in the last four years!BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.45.01BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.43.29BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.48.04 I loved the recycled brick edgings; the winding gravel paths;BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.47.13BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.50.06 the skillful planting for colour and texture at all times of the year in such a small space;BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.50.47BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.52.57BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.47.58BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.47.38BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.45.37BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.46.31 the use of old stumps, logs and branches and rock in the landscape, as well as lots of pots and wooden half-barrels; the beautiful grasses;BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.51.07BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.47.47BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.50.29BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.48.43BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.46.27BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.49.58 the blue mosaic dish and rock bird bath and the espaliered japonica on the front fence.BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.53.47BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.49.02BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.47.03BlogPrivSpec20%Reszd2014-09-14 14.46.13Sustainable Gardens

Markos Garden

21 Barnett St Hampton, Melbourne, VIC   16m x 45m

http://www.markdymiotis.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRKrJuEN5uA

The last two gardens have focused on particular groups of plants (succulents/ cacti and Australian natives). This small suburban garden is no different, only this time it’s Mediterranean food plants! Its owner, Mark Dymiotis, hailed from Cyprus 55 years ago and bought this house with a bare garden in 1985. He has a passion for both Mediterranean food and the philosophy of Simple Living and has incorporated them both into his lifestyle and career , teaching adult education courses on vegetable growing, the Mediterranean diet, making sourdough bread and pizzas, oven building, wine making and olive preserving. It is amazing how much he can grow and produce in his tiny garden!BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 015BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 014 The front garden on the street is Mediterranean cottage style and contains 3 cherry trees, 2 pomegranates, a persimmon, a grapevine pergola and a significant salvia collection, maintained by the Salvia Study Group. Mark grows salvias for their flowers, perfume, medicinal properties, drought and disease resistance and frost tolerance.

BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 020BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 009BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 021BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 018 The back garden has a small lawn with two olive trees; an orchard of four varieties of plums, three varieties of apricots, two types of pears, many varieties of figs, mandarins (two varieties on the one tree), a lemon tree, a Kiwi fruit vine and another grapevine pergola; raised vegetable beds with frames; a compost heap; three large rainwater tanks;  a shed (for wine making, olive preserving and making tomato sauce) and two brick wood-fired ovens for bread and pizzas.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 016BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 022BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 024BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 017 There are also two climbing roses (Lady Hillingdon and Iceberg), a mock orange, a jasmine and a honeysuckle. The raised vegetable beds are constructed with concrete and brick walls, to reduce water loss and insect nests, and are totally organic. Mark maintains high productivity with the use of compost, manure and green manure to improve the naturally sandy soil; crop rotation and companion planting: nasturtiums under the fruit trees; basil and stinging nettle in the vegetable patch; marigolds with tomatoes and zinnias with cucumbers and beans. In Summer, he grows tomatoes, capsicums and chillies; cucumbers, zucchinis and eggplants; marrows, corn and beans; and onions, purslane and amaranth. The Winter garden produces broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower; broad beans; rocket and coriander; and garlic, fennel and globe artichokes. Parsley, silver beet, celery, cos lettuce, spring onions and a huge variety of herbs are grown year round. I would highly recommend a visit to this garden, especially if you love home-grown food!

BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 011BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 013BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdfeb2010 025Hendrik’s Garden

9 Camden Rd Hughesdale, Melbourne, VIC   14km SE from Melbourne CBD  0.4 ha  15m x 48m

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s3135331.htm

http://www.vanleeuwengreen.com/static/uploads/files/edible-eden-wfdgvdouwmov.pdf

Another very impressive, productive small garden, created by professional horticulturalist and landscape gardener, Hendrik Van Leeuwen, who bought place with his partner Nicole in 2005. Hendrik  started his landscaping business, Van Leeuwen Green (http://www.vanleeuwengreen.com/) with Jake Green in 1995. They design and construct, renovate and maintain gardens, so he had plenty of experience and design knowledge to put into practice. After renovating the Californian bungalow house, Hendrik and Nicole turned their attention to the bare front and back gardens, which afforded them a blank canvas with which to work. Design features include: foliage texture, colour and form; traditional seasonal flowering events; plant zoning for similar requirements; the planting of low water use, low maintenance species, which thrive in hot, dry conditions, and aesthetic food plants (vegetables, fruit and herbs). Sustainable features include:  the use of sustainable hard landscaping; rainwater harvest drip irrigation and recycled grey water; recycled red gum sleepers around the garden beds and chooks to recycle food scraps and produce poultry manure.

The formal front garden matches the design of the house and contains a front hedge of Lilly Pilly ‘Bush Christmas’ and two rectangular beds, edged with English box, containing central crab apples; Chinese Plumbago, Ceratostigma wilmottianum, echeverias and purple succulent, Aeonium arboretum ‘Schwarzkopf’; grasses and heliotrope. It has a restricted but effective colour palette, with bold massed plantings for visual effect and weed suppression and foliage contrast in colour and form.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 276BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 280The south side of the house is cool and protected, and has the appearance of a lush tropical rainforest, with two types of Strelitzia, S. nicolai and S. reginae; clivias; native frangipani and giant liriope. All the plants were chosen for their low water requirements, longevity, toughness and ability to withstand heat waves. Away from the house as you approach the back garden are large bottlebrush trees; grasses (Poa and Pennisetum) and sedges (Lomandra); herbaceous perennials, both native (kangaroo paw) and exotic (salvias and red hot pokers). Citrus, stone fruit and a Natal plum, Carissa grandiflora, grow along the southern fence.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 244BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 261BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 260The back garden is highly organized and productive with an organic vegetable garden, edged with railway sleepers; a chook pen; fruit trees and shrubs and herbaceous perennials.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 248BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 255 Bifold doors open out onto sustainably grown speargum decking, penetrated by a single olive tree, forming an outdoor living space. Salad greens are grown in boxes under the kitchen window for easy access and the deck is shaded by a pergola, clad with grape and kiwi fruit vines. A small bed in front of the decking contains cool climate bananas (Abyssinian banana, Ensete ventricosum), strelitzia and a bangalow palm. A low clipped rosemary hedge follows the decking near the outdoor toilet and a clipped lillypilly hedge screens the workshop and borders a small lawn, turfed with heat- and drought-tolerant Kikuya grass, which is watered with grey water. Key accent plants include a giant ornamental banana in the middle of the backyard and a lemon-scented gum at the very back.The northern boundary is planted with apple/ peach and citrus trees; mixed vegies and herbs (globe artichokes) and shrubs and perennials.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 273 The formal vegetable garden, near the chook pen, is heavily mulched with pea straw and chook manure to enrich the naturally sandy loam soil and is watered using drip irrigation and rainwater. I loved the red stems of the rainbow chard, the Russell lupins, planted for their flowers and soil nutrition, and the bamboo trellis of peas.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 274BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 252BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 251 There is also a round paved area with a fire pit (Castlemaine slate) for entertaining.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 272BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 263 There were so many inspiring ideas in this small garden! I loved its illusion of the tropics, despite the fact that it is situated in the far south of Australia. The neighbours also had a great sense of colour!BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 283BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 284BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdgrampians 4 285Small Gardens

Marg’s Tropical Cornucopia

66 Prospect Hill Rd, Camberwell, Melbourne, VIC   45m x 20m

This garden is another wonderful, inspiring, highly  productive ‘tropical’ garden in a small space, containing many semitropical plants rarely grown in Melbourne! Ian and Marg bought their 1883 house in 1984, then the neighbouring property in 2003. There are no lawns, just brickwork and paving, and the relaxation spaces have a distinctly Moroccan feel, from the outdoor dining area surrounded by bamboo to the rooftop garden and plant selection, especially the orange and pink bougainvillea ‘Tango’.BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 010BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 001BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 015BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 002BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 008 In 1990, they planted casuarinas, a big figtree in the backyard, persimmons leading to the front verandah and Lamarque roses by the seat in the front fence, but the rest of the garden was planted from 2004 on, after the installation of two rainwater tanks (10 000 litres). A hydroponic vertical garden was inspired by Patrick Blanc. They even have their own beehives, which produce 30 kg honey annually, right in the heart of Melbourne!BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 021BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 022

It is hard to comprehend the amazing variety and number of plants in this tiny garden : over seventy food-producing plants, forty different fruit trees and hundreds of medicinal herbs and perfumed plants, reflecting Marg’s background as a cosmetic chemist. Food plants include: three different types of avocado, seven types of banana, three fig varieties and three different grapes, apricots and other pome trees, limes,  guavas, a persimmon, a pomegranate, and a huge variety of tropical fruit trees like black/green sapotes, custard apples, mango, mountain pawpaw, jabotica and the delicious-sounding icecream bean!BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 005BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 012 There are bottle trees, candlenuts, plants with red/black and variegated foliage, cannas and bougainvilleas for colour, giant bamboo for sound and many many succulents for their hardiness, architectural structure and Winter colour.

BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 011BlogPrivSpec50%Reszdmar 2010 007

Marg has achieved her incredible success by incorporating organic matter and weathered granitic sand, rich in volcanic nutrients and sourced from Dromana, into the sandy topsoil, as well as using her own foliar spray, Marg’s Magic Mix, a concentrate made from plant, fish and mineral sources, which is diluted and then sprayed on the plants.

The Nook

5 Tavistock Rd, Monbulk, VIC   0.2 ha (0.5 acres)

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s3062916.htm

BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 022Another garden packed with interesting plants and valuable ideas for small gardens, The Nook is situated at Monbulk, the centre for the horticultural industry in Victoria, especially flowers, which are exported all over the world and berries for jam making, and the 1920s cottage is part of that legacy, having once been owned by fruit pickers. Val and Don Jackson extended and refurbished the house after they bought the block in 1999. Don was a contemporary fellow horticulturalist of Edna Walling, the association marked by the planting of three silver birches, Edna’s signature plants, at the entrance.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 021 The design of the romantic English cottage style garden owes much to Don’s efforts, but sadly he passed away in 2007 and the garden became Val’s therapy.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 008BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 016BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 010 Design elements include:  arches, trellises and arbours, covered with roses and clematis; meandering brick paths, steps and paving; a small bridge to a rose garden; a secret garden; an alpine rock garden; a borrowed landscape of the neighbour’s chestnut trees; distinct microclimates; and separate areas to suit plants with different growing conditions.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 007BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 006 BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 017BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 015BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 019Azaleas, rhododendrons, camellias, hydrangeas, cyclamens, cliveas  and hellebores are grouped in the shade of mature walnut trees and a hazelnuts, while roses, succulents and vegetables are in the sunnier parts of the garden.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 018BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 012 I loved the herbaceous borders, filled with so many lovely cottage plants like foxgloves, delphiniums and salvias. Roses include: Mutabilis; Pink Perpetué; Clair Matin; Lavender Lassie; Paul Transom; and Graham Thomas , while Clematis ‘Belle of Woking’ and C. montana ‘Tetrarose’ cover the walkway. There are fuchsias and pieris; cordylines and ferns; many succulents; unusual evergreen plants like the aromatic Adenandra from South Africa and the burgundy Chinese Fringe Flower, Loropetalum chinense ‘Roseum’; and interesting bulbs like Hoop Petticoat daffodils and tuberous plants like Rhodohypoxis, which were new to me.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 020BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 013BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 1 014 This delightful small garden is packed with colour and perfume and is still open to the public through Open Gardens Victoria. See: http://www.opengardensvictoria.org.au/companies/25/62/The-Nook .

Coburn

134 Wooralla Drive Mt Eliza, Mornington Peninsula, VIC   0.2 ha (0.5 acres)

Finally, Carole Coburn’s delightful small garden, developed over 20 years, and fully deserving of the lyrical description by Open Garden Australia, back in October 2009 : ‘a Persian carpet, embroidered with rivers of jewel-like colours’. It did not disappoint!BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 150 The dense plantings include: lots of old-fashioned climbing and rambling roses, sprawling over pergolas, fences and arbours (eg. Mme Alfred Carrière);BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 172BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 148BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 168BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 169 Many small trees like maples, silver birches, a weeping cherry and palm trees;BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 149BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 130BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 126 And massed plantings of campanula, foxgloves and lamium; and Spring bulbs.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 173BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 170BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 147BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 156BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 158 The winding paths are bordered by hedging plants and there is a tranquil lawn.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 155BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 144BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 140 There is also a natural curved shaped pool with shallow stone shelving and an old timber decking, its edges softened by creeping plants, a spa and a pottery outdoor heater.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 136BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 137BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 162BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 160 I loved the use of planters and pots.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 131BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 157BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdoctober 164Visiting these amazing gardens has vastly enriched my knowledge of garden design principles and plants and all of them are prime examples of the huge potential in gardens, irrespective of garden size, climate and budget. I feel so lucky to have been able to access them through Open Gardens Australia, as well as various garden festivals, and look forward to getting to know some of the beautiful gardens in our new state. We have just returned from a weekend in the Southern Highlands, Sydney’s equivalent to Melbourne’s Mt Macedon, so I will finish the year with a December post about the fabulous gardens we visited. Next year, I am focusing on my beloved roses! Such wonderful dreamy gardens…!!!

 

 

 

 

Favourite Private Specialty Gardens : Part 1: Artists’ Gardens

Over the next two months, I am featuring specialist private gardens, which I have divided into 4 categories : Artists’ Gardens (October); Dry Climate and Mediterranean Gardens (November) ; Sustainable Gardens (November); and Small Gardens (November). It’s a very eclectic mix, but we were impressed by every one of them. Some of them cross over categories. For example, the gardens of Meanderings and Barwon Heads are both included in Dry Climate Gardens, but are also Small Gardens, while the Markos Garden, a part of Sustainable Gardens, is very much a Mediterranean Garden and a Small Garden. Hendrik’s Garden is also both sustainable and small, while Art Rocks is both a Dry Climate Garden and an Artists’ Retreat and Tickle Tank is an Artist’s Garden, which is only small- a mere 20m by 20m. I will begin with Artists’ Gardens, looking firstly at mosaics, then progressing onto painters. Again, this is only a very small selection of the wonderful gardens in Australia and the choice was often dictated by the availability of good photographs in my collection. I have covered other art-related gardens in my posts on Carrick Hill, Werribee and Heide and Sculpture Gardens: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/02/09/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-historic-homes-and-gardens/ and https://candeloblooms.com/2016/06/14/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-sculpture-gardens/.

Artist Gardens

Mosaics:

Blog NewBeginnings20%Reszd2015-01-21 10.34.49BlogCreativity120%Reszd2014-05-03 20.36.56Blog SpringsprungFav20%ReszdIMG_0580I have always loved mosaics in the garden- they add colour and interest, especially in Winter, and can compliment plants when in flower. And they are really fun to make! No doubt through my posts, you have already seen my stepping-stones, my Mothers’ Day Bird Plate and my two bird sticks, the latter two made in workshops at the Geelong Community Garden  with Helen Millar of Flock of Birds. See: http://www.flockofbirdsmosaics.org  and https://candeloblooms.com/2016/05/10/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-education-gardens/.  During the 40th Kyneton Daffodil Arts festival in Spring 2012, we visited:

Geraldine Phelan’s Studio and Garden

60 Dettman’s Lane, Kyneton, VIC       Ph: (03)5422 7154 and 0478605540

http://www.kynetondaffodilarts.org.au/mosaics.html

Geraldine is a mosaic artist, who moved to Central Victoria in 2010. This is her studio.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 174BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 172BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 181 She does beautiful work and also teaches mosaic classes.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 170BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 176BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 166BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 187BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 184 Here are some photos of her gypsy caravan (above) and the mosaic work of competition entrants during the festival (above and below).BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 191BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 195BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 151BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdsept 2012 196The Flying Teapot

111 Inglis St, Ballan, VIC, 3342

BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 044

A prominent and highly imaginative landmark in the main street of Ballan, this wonderful mosaic fence was created by Lou Callow, a local artist and teacher.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 054BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 048BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 056 There is so much in this wall, that I will let the photos tell their story.BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 065BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 061BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 066BlogPrivSpec25%Reszdgrampians 4 063Tickle Tank

24 Hill Street, Mt Barker, Adelaide Hills, South Australia          450 m2

http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/home-among-the-gumtrees/around-the-house/tickle-tank/#.

An AMAZING house and garden, built by Irene Pearce, a sculptor and  professional potter for 27 years, which thoroughly merits the two videos made about it. See:

http://www.salife7.com.au/south-australia/gardening/open-gardens/tickle-tank     and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQ68CwYzKt0BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7565In 1998, Irene bought a 50,000 gallon concrete water tank, which was built in 1944 and was the old town water storage.  She siphoned the water out and excavated 20 truckloads of soil, as three quarters of the tank was buried underground. The tank is 10m across and 4m tall and became her kitchen, dining and family room.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7566

She bought three more tanks (3000 and 5000 gallons), which were lowered into position by cranes and became the bathroom, laundry and a small bedroom for her grandchildren. She hired a concrete cutting contractor to cut holes in the concrete tanks for doors and windows and used recycled jarrah from the original tank to make the doors.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7595BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7749 Irene has a very quirky, eclectic style and the dwelling has both a Greek (blue and white colours) and nautical feel (blue and white colours again; sail sun shelter; life buoys; ropes; shells; driftwood, sea horses, portholes).BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7622BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7719BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7638BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7746

It’s a wonderful place and so inspirational. Everything has been done on a very low budget and made by hand out of recycled materials, both in the house and the garden. I loved her driftwood handles on the cupboard doors, her hidden bath under the floor, the fungi lamps and all her collections.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7579The multilevel garden is 450 square metres and is low maintenance, organic and water-wise. It has a series of open air rooms for relaxation, meditation, eating and adventures for kids. BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7720BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7718All the materials used in the garden are recycled or were salvaged from the site.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7735 The retaining walls became garden seats and the excess water runoff became a small creek, crossed by a recycled timber bridge. Irene sculpted a mermaid out of a stone wall and a dragon out of cement.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7763BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7741BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7725BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7731 Broken tiles were used to make a mosaic wall in the rose arbour (covered with Lorraine Lee), as well as a white wisteria mural outside the kitchen, mosaic window edges and tables  and mosaic floors in the kitchen and shower recess. Apparently, since our visit in 2008, there is a new mosaic driveway.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7642BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7628BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7647BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7651BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7625BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7766 There is an old pot-bellied stove outside for cooking and heat, as well as a fire pit out of rendered concrete. The rendered stone walls maintain moisture and keep the plants cool in Summer.

BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7714BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7630The garden has a wonderful, blowsy, overgrown feel and is a mixture of exotics and natives, all so densely planted that it is difficult for weeds to get going. Plants include : Hardenbergia and purple Native Mint Bush; fruit trees and crab apples; roses; hardy native grasses; herbs; self-seeding annuals; hardy cottage perennials; Spring bulbs and  lots of succulents in pots. There is so much to this garden- we actually went round twice, taking a million photos for future ideas! Here are a few of Irene’s delightful sculptures:BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7645BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7592BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7571Painters:

The Cedars

Heysen Rd, Hahndorf, Adelaide Hills, South Australia, 5245        60 acres

10am-4.30pm Tuesday-Sunday and Public Holidays; Closed on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and Good Friday   $10 Adult; $8 Concession; $5 Garden only

http://hansheysen.com.au/    and https://www.artgallery.sa.gov.au/agsa/home/Learning/docs/Online_Resources/Heysen_Trail.pdf

While we were in South Australia in October 2008, we also visited the home of two of South Australia’s most famous artists, Hans Heysen and his daughter Nora.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6975Hans Heysen bought the 1878 colonial villa in August 1912, where he lived with his wife Sallie and 8 children until his death in 1968, aged 90. He renovated and updated the house from 1912-1920, decorating it in a Federation Arts-and-Crafts style. It is still privately owned by the Heysen grandchildren and very little has changed since the days when Hans was still alive. The comfortable old furniture and textiles, Hans’ paintings and Nora’s portraits and all the old books and magazines give the house a very welcoming warm feel. There is a wonderful light throughout the house and a beautiful window overlooking the garden. I immediately fell in love with this beautiful old house and its equally lovely garden!BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7042BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6970Hans loved his garden, laying out all the garden beds and building the stone paths, walls and steps out of sandstone and quartz. He planted mainly exotic species : Himalayan Cedar trees, after which the property was named; Crab Apple Malus spectabilis; Chaenomeles japonica; Bourbon roses including one of my favourite roses,  Souvenir de la Malmaison, painted by both Hans and Nora; Tea roses (Duchess de Brabant) and Hybrid Teas (Queen Elizabeth); lilacs; iris; massed zinnias; Spring bulbs and old-fashioned perennials.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6961BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6967BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6968BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7050We also walked around the property, stopping at 11 viewing boxes, where we could compare prints of Hans’ landscapes with the exact location of each work. Winner of the Wynne Prize (the landscape equivalent of the Archibald Prize) nine times, Hans was most famous for his portraits of gum trees, the 600 year old River Red Gums Eucalyptus camaldulensis and White Gums Eucalyptus rubida. He was such a keen conservationist, that he bought neighbouring properties to prevent the trees from being cut down.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6999BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_7018BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6998The entrance price also includes a tour of the studios of both Hans (photos 1 and 2) and Nora (photo 3). Nora was the first woman to win the Archibald Prize in 1938, as well as being Australia’s first female war artist. It was wonderful to see all their charcoal and pencil sketches; lithographs of agricultural scenes, sheds and draughthorses; the paintings of gum trees with the play of light on their trunks; and the paintings of still life and floral arrangements.BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6997BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6979BlogPrivSpec25%ReszdIMG_6960When we visited ‘The Cedars’ back in 2008, because the property was still privately owned, it was impossible to get public funding for it and the money from sales and entrance fees only covered insurance. The potential cost of upkeep of the house was a barrier to future National Trust involvement, so it was with great delight that I discovered that in April 2016, the property was granted $1 Million from the Federal Government for its upkeep. It is a beautiful historic property and well worth visiting if you get a chance.

Wentworth Falls Art Gallery

161 Falls Rd, Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains, NSW 2782  PH (02) 4757 1139    Just under 1 acre

10am-5pm Wednesday-Sunday and Public Holidays

http://www.fallsgallery.com.au/

BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5413BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5409Established in 1990 by Anne and Ian Smith, the gallery is housed in an early 1900s weatherboard cottage in a large mountain garden, a two minute walk to the Falls Reserve Picnic area and lookouts.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5423BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5422 Anne paints luscious females and Ian is a ceramic artist, so they both have workspaces at the back – a studio for Anne and a pottery workshop for Ian. Both their work is on sale, as well as art work by Garry Shead, Wendy Sharpe, Bernard Ollis, Max Miller, Arthur Boyd, Charles Blackman and John Olsen.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5419BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5421I loved their beautifully landscaped mountain garden with its Japanese Maples, conifers and native vegetation, huge tree ferns, azaleas and rhododendrons, chaenomeles, box hedging and topiary, hellebores and lots of outdoor statues.BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5408BlogPrivSpec20%ReszdIMG_5407 It had such a peaceful relaxing feel and was so green, unlike my final artist’s garden, a complete contrast :

Art Rocks

199 Teesdale-Inverleigh Rd, Inverleigh, VIC 3321  Ph (03) 5265 1370; 0417522010

4km  from Inverleigh; 20 minutes from Geelong and 1 hour from Melbourne

http://www.artrocks.net.au

BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0361Owned by artist and teacher, Adé Loe, and environmentalist, Bronte Payne, Art Rocks is a studio gallery and Bed & Breakfast accommodation.BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0340BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0351BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0353 They run workshops and weekend retreats for sculpture, mosaics, ceramics, drawing, painting, glasswork and making glass beads.BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0366BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0364We visited this property as part of the annual Golden Plains Art Trail in March 2012 and were blown away by its dramatic use of colour and contrast; its amazing cacti and succulent garden and dry climate plants;

BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0334BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0314BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0322BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0330BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0324BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0377BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0304BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0333BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0311BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0348 its sculpture park; its use of recycled material and its panoramic views.BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0374BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0335BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0345BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0349

It is a great example of dry climate gardening and leads very neatly into the next category: Dry Climate and Mediterranean Gardens, which I will discuss next month, along with Small and Sustainable Gardens.BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0318BlogPrivSpec50%ReszdIMG_0319

Favourite Private Gardens: Historic Gardens: Part 2

Last month, we visited private historic gardens from the late 19th century. This post describes the work of garden designers and keen gardeners in the early 20th century: Joan Law-Smith at Bolobek; Edna Walling at Bickleigh Vale Village and Mawarra at the Grove and Dame Elisabeth Murdoch at Cruden Farm.

Bolobek        1911

370 Mt Macedon Rd, Mt Macedon    3.6 ha (9 ac)   Less than 1 hour drive from Melbourne

http://bolobek.com.au/

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s4034491.htm

https://vimeo.com/abodetv/review/124387849/30b995a54b

One of the finest and most visited, documented and photographed private gardens in Australia and another beautiful old garden in Mt Macedon, established over 100 years ago and made famous by a subsequent owner, Joan Law-Smith. It is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. Their site has an excellent map of the garden. See: http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/133719/Bolobek.pdf. The garden is 450 metres above sea level with frequent frosts and snow and 750 mm rain, temperatures ranging from 0 degrees in Winter to 40 degrees in Summer and a grey loam soil on a clay base, tending towards acidity. Unfortunately, the day we visited Bolobek for the Spring plant fair was very grey and rainy, so the photos are all a bit dark, but they still will give you an idea of the garden layout and beauty. For photos in Summer, see: http://aggregata.blogspot.com.au/2012/12/visit-to-bolobek-gardens-in-mt-macedon.html

History

The land, on which Bolobek was settled, was originally Bolobek Swamp, which provided food for the Wurundjeri aboriginal people, but the swamps were drained in the 19th Century. Bolobek means ‘undulating’ in the local aboriginal dialect. Between 1910-1914, Oswald Syme, the youngest son of David Syme, the founder of the Melbourne Age newspaper, bought more than 900 acres in adjoining parcels of land, which were parts of 2 former pastoral runs, Turitable and Wooling. Wooling, an aboriginal word meaning ‘nestling of many waters’, was originally settled in 1839 by William Robertson and included a 9 acre orchard, a 4 acre kitchen garden and Victoria’s first sawmill, as well as fish ponds, the first breeding grounds of brown trout and English salmon trout on the mainland, the ova being imported from Tasmania in 1862. Oswald and his wife, Mildred, built a three-storey Edwardian mansion in 1911 and lived there for over 60 years. Mildred was a keen gardener and laid out a 5 acre garden, including a 0.5 acre orchard. Many trees (rows of lindens, poplars and oaks) and shrubs have survived from the original garden plan. They built a dam (Syme’s Lake) over the original trout hatchery ponds, supplying reticulated water to a garden tank by gravity for the garden and stock troughs. Oswald was a member of the Royal Agricultural Society and ran a Romney Marsh sheep stud, a Friesian stud and a huge dairy complex on Bolobek, the latter destroyed in the 1952 fires, after which 270 ha on Hamilton Rd were excised. They also had a nine-hole golf course, a croquet lawn, a tennis court and a swimming pool.

In 1969, Bolobek was bought by Robert and Joan Law-Smith. Robert was a director of Qantas and BHP and a grazier and ran 400 Herefords and 1000 first cross ewes. They demolished the old house and many outbuildings, then built a smaller single storey house on the original site. It was designed by Phyllis and John Murphy and made of white bagged brick with a grey slate roof and large low windows looking straight out into the garden.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.22.30 Joan was a talented gardener, artist and writer. She removed many trees, including the prunus and the bedding plants, and simplified the design, creating geometrically-shaped compartments, with 3 main axes paths, radiating from a central square lawn adjacent to the house and allowing a grand vista, framed by Italian Poplars, towards Mt Robertson. She loved old roses for their scent, floral arrangements and painting and created a walled garden for them from old bricks, sourced from an old demolished house. She also loved soft pastel colours and the garden has a very romantic dreamy feel with its emphasis on green and white.Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.29.32In 1990, the Law-Smiths sold Bolobek and it passed through a number of hands, the garden gradually going into decline. A further 70 ha land was subdivided in the late 1990s. Greville and Jill Egerton bought the property in 2002 and started renovating the garden and property. They sold to the current owners, Hugh and Brigid Robertson, in 2006. They spent the next two years observing the garden through the seasons and then started a major rejuvenation program in the garden. Since 2008, restoration works have included :

Replacing the old watering system;

Replacing the cypress and pine avenues, which were dying from old age and the drought, with oaks;

Replacing the crab apple and Lombardy poplar walks;

Repaving and regravelling paths and replacing the pergola;

Planting a new middle storey in the garden, which was lost from the neglect in the late 1990s;

Replanting the orchard and planting native trees around the farm; and

Designing and planting a large vegetable garden and picking garden, next to the original Syme vegetable garden.

Because of the micro-climates in the garden, affording pockets of shade, moisture and protection from the prevailing NW winds, in 2008 during the peak of the drought, the Robertsons were able to open the garden to visitors for the first time in 20 years and they had 6000 visitors. The property is now 550 ha and runs 1000 Border Leicester X Merino ewes and a self-replacing herd of 500 Angus cattle. There is self-contained accommodation at ‘The Cottage’, the original station hand’s house beside the garden. Open Garden Plant Fairs were held in 2008 and 2011, with over 10 000 visitors over the 4 days. Today, the garden is used for weddings, concerts and many fund-raising events, as well as hosting the Mt Macedon Horticultural Society Annual Garden Lovers Fair, which we attended in September 2014. The next fair is on 17 and 18 September 2016. There are many stalls selling rare and unusual perennials, trees and shrubs, bulbs, succulents and Australian natives, as well as sculpture and specialist tools. Entrance to the garden is $10 pp.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.17.16Design

Modern formal garden style in 2.5 ha inner garden, with larger informal areas in the outer garden and park.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.13.40Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.19.51 A main axes leads from the house to a distant view of Mt Robertson and there are 2 shorter axes parallel to the main axes, which are lined with weeping birch.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.25.37Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.22.00

Cross axes contains a pergola and a sculpture of a girl  at the end of the apple walk.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.20.33Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.18.46Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.19.04Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.22.46Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.24.11 The colour scheme is very restrained with an emphasis on a variety of green foliage and white, complementing the white house and courtyard and the grey roof and silvery-grey timber fence. White flowers include: white lilies, white nicotiana and white daisies with white watsonias along the poplar walk and a white wisteria, underplanted with double white violets, over the pergola.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.21.53 A hedge of white Iceberg roses complement the white bark of the silver birches behind, the leggy rose stems hidden behind box hedges.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.15.09Formal design elements include :

Lime, Lombardy poplar and crab apple (Golden Hornet) walks, the latter underplanted with English primroses and aquilegas.

Wisteria pergola and dovecot;Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.21.13Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.21.00Walled rose garden; Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.16.04Herbaceous borders;Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.16.34Woodland plantings including shrubs, bulbs, hellebores, columbines and Soloman’s Seal (Polygonatum multiflorum);Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.22.57Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.23.08Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.23.35Sweeping lawns with mature shrubs, deciduous trees and naturalized bulbs;Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.13.05Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.20.08I also loved seeing the Flowering quince shrubs in full bloom- white, pink-and-white and red forms and the exquisite magnolias.Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.29.55Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.30.58Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.31.04Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.31.25Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.23.12Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.28.28Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.28.35Statuary including a sundial and a marble statue.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.23.43 Ornamental lake and a pool with a figure;

Rows of silver birch and Bhutan cypress and Laurustinus and Lilac hedges;Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.22.12Stone-lined channels and paths;Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.23.58Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.12.54White gravel courtyard and curved undulating gravel driveway and an avenue of Southern Mahogany (Eucalyptus botryoides).Blog PHGPT2 30%Reszd2014-09-20 10.28.10I loved the walled garden with its espaliered pear trees and climbing roses ( including Wedding Day, Constance Spry , Souvenir de la Malmaison, Souvenir de St Anne and Felicité et Perpetué) over the brick walls.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.16.21Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.16.10Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.15.00Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.14.35Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.13.46 There are 4 symmetrical beds, around the central sundial, separated by mellow brick paths.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.14.01Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.15.20Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.13.50Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.14.27 Other Old Roses include Madame Hardy, Charles de Mills, Maxima, Celeste, Boule de Neige, Mme Pierre Oger and Reine des Violettes.  The roses are underplanted with blue cranesbill, Alchemilla mollis, dianthus, wild strawberries and lambs’ ears.Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.15.37Blog PHGPT2 25%Reszd2014-09-20 10.15.43Bickleigh Vale Village  1920s

Bickleigh Vale Rd and Edna Walling Lane, Mooroolbark     3 ha

http://www.bickleighvalevillage.com.au/

The foothills of the Dandenongs, west of Melbourne, are the other famous area for beautiful old gardens and were the canvas for prominent garden designer Edna Walling.Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1898

History

Originally, Edna  bought 3 acres and built her cottage, ‘Sonning’, in 1921 out of local stone, timber and recycled materials. Later, she bought 18 adjoining acres, which she subdivided into 1-2 acre lots, creating an English-style village with country laneways, deciduous trees and hedgerows. She named it ‘Bickleigh Vale’ after the village, where she grew up in England. Edna’s goal was to create an environment, in which the houses and gardens related harmoniously with each other, as well as the natural environment, a key tenet of the Arts and Crafts movement. She was also an early advocate of Australian natives. Prospective owners had to agree to have their future cottage and its garden designed by Edna and she supplied all the plants. The properties are all linked by side gates, allowing easy access into each other’s gardens and creating a communal atmosphere.Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1825Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1871 The cottages were small and simple with rustic stone on the lower levels, dark shingles on the upper gable ends, simple low-set multi-paned casement windows, dormer windows in high-pitched roofs, stone and brick chimneys and French doors and patios.Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1836Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1835Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1894 All the gardens bear Edna’s signature trademarks of : densely planted trees and shrubs; stone walls and steps; stone and timber pergolas; low front fences of timber, stone and wire; paths linking garden rooms; ponds and arbours; mossy lawns; and the use of exotic and native vegetation.

Between the 1920s and 1940s, 16 cottages were built, each one different in size and character, but still relating harmoniously with each other, as well as the natural environment. A subdivision in the 1950s created more than 30 properties. Edna moved to ‘The Barn’, built in 1951 and then Buderim, Queensland in 1967.

Today, the village is managed by the Friends of Bickleigh Vale, a group comprising of all the owners. The trees are now fully mature and their shade has changed the nature of the gardens. Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1843Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1846Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1845Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1853The cottages have been adapted to suit modern needs. They were described by the National Trust as a Classified Landscape in 1978 and were included in the Victorian Heritage Register in 2005. See: http://www.onmydoorstep.com.au/heritage-listing/1856/bickleigh-vale.

In 1988, Devon Lane was renamed Edna Walling Lane. We were lucky enough to visit Bickleigh Vale in May 2012, as the owner of Badger’s Wood, Anna Beesley, was a fellow student in my garden design course and she organized a class visit. See: http://www.bickleighvalevillage.com.au/badgers-wood.html .

In Spring later that year, 7 Edna Walling gardens were open to the public : Badger’s Wood 1937; Devon Cottage 1956; Downderry; Mistover 1930; The Sheilan; The Barn 1928; and Wimbourne 1940.Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1863Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1859Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1885Design

Edna Walling’s  design principles included:

Garden rooms, in which the bare rooms are visible in Winter;

Green is the most important colour, with texture and foliage playing an important role;Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1844Trees are planted in copses and ground covers are allowed to take over; andBlog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1852Gardens should be mulched and not over-watered. They should be allowed to grow naturally and should be left alone with minimal pruning;Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1856Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1839Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1878Plantings include : old remnant gums (Eucalypts and Corymbias) and indigenous blackwoods; exotic conifers including cypress, pines and cedars; exotic deciduous trees including oaks, elms, poplars and aspens, birches, beeches, hornbeams, ash, Japanese Maples, Liquidambars, Crepe Myrtles, Hawthornes and crab apples. The woodland gardens were underplanted with hellebores and naturalized bulbs (freesias, bluebells) in the grass, as well as lots of her signature plants including azaleas, rhododendrons, camellias, roses and  jasmine.Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1890

Local stone was used to create dry-stone walls, footpaths, patios and steps.Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1841Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1831Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1821Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1826Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1850Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1822Blog PHGPT1 50%ReszdIMG_1837Mawarra at The Grove  1932

6 Sherbrooke Rd. Sherbrooke   Dandenong Ranges, close to the Alfred Nicholas Gardens and next to Sherbrooke Forest                           1.2 ha (3 ac)

https://www.vrgetaways.com.au/accommodation/sherbrooke/mawarra/

A beautiful temperate mountain garden designed by Edna Walling and considered to be one of the finest examples of her work. She described it as ‘ a symphony in steps and beautiful trees’.Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 030Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 028History

Originally, the property was called ‘The Grove’ and the house was built in 1932 by Phyllis Mc Millan for her mother Flora May Marshall and her unmarried sisters. It was named after their uncle’s home at 31 The Grove, Boltons, Kensington, where the sisters often stayed when visiting their wealthy bachelor uncles in London.Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 026 Edna Walling was employed to design and develop the garden from 1932-1935, but abandoned the project after an argument with Phyllis over a minor sum of money (20 shillings), compared to the overall cost of the stonework (7500 pounds, equivalent to $750 000 today!). The garden path named ’20 Shillings’ was created to show where Edna stopped working and others began. Edna had employed Eric Hammond to do much of the stonework, so after Edna left, it fell to Eric to complete the task.Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 063Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 067In 1936, he also built ‘Wendy’s Cottage, based on the Marshall sisters’ uncles home ‘Nalderswood’ in Surrey, England, with the help of his friend H Roy Langley. The life-sized doll’s house was enjoyed by all the sisters’ nephews and nieces.Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 044Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 037In  1960, Mr and Mrs Frank Walker and Mrs Carol Sallah became the second owners and renamed the property ‘Mawarra’, an aboriginal word meaning ‘a peaceful place’, the original name taken by the sisters to their new abode in Mornington. Later, the name was returned to the property by Norman Marshall, the grandson of Flora May, so the house was called ‘Mawarra Manor’. Mr Jess Exiner and Mr Peter Harris bought the property in 2002 and restored the house over 2 years and the garden over 5 years. It is now owned by John Champion , who has continued to restore the garden over the last 8-10 years. Erigeron is a major problem, its roots damaging the rock walls and stonework. It is possible to stay in both ‘Mawarra Manor’ and ‘Wendy’s Cottage’. There is even a heated indoor pool, sauna and gym in the main house.Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 031Design

Italianate Terrace style due to the steep slope of the site;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 075Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 071

Large scale with many long walkways and avenues, secret paths and many surprises;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 076 Driveway is long, dark and narrow and opens out into bright light around the house;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 023Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 024Grand stone staircase with broad shallow steps down to an octagonal reflecting pond;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 027Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 065Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 068Mossy low stone walls, flagged fern-lined paths and terraces;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 069Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 032Croquet lawn surrounded by birch;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 055Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 054Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 051Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 053Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 050Lots of mature exotic trees: weeping cherries, oaks, elms, birch, maples and European beech trees,  underplanted with bluebells;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 064Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 060Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 056Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 057Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 052Exotic shrubs : azaleas, camellias and rhododendrons;Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 025Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 062Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 072Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 078Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 066Wendy House with its own garden;   andBlog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 045Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 040Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 042Miniature Tudor village.Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 043Blog PHGPT1 25%Reszdgrampians 1 047Cruden Farm  1928

60 Cranbourne Rd Langwarrin, VIC, 3210          8ha (20 ac) garden, 54 ha farm ;                50 km from CBD Melbourne (1 hour drive)

www.crudenfarm.com.au 

Very famous old garden, developed over 80 years by Dame Elisabeth Murdoch. It is featured on Monty Don’s Round the World in 80 Gardens. See: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xwzd7r_around-the-world-in-80-gardens-2-australia-and-new-zealand_lifestyle.   (26 minutes into the video).

Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 132History

Originally a 90 ac orchard and farm, Cruden Farm was bought by Sir Keith Murdoch in 1928 as a wedding present for his bride, Elisabeth Greene (1909-2012). The small cottage was significantly extended by architect, Harold Desbrowe-Annear.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 113Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 075 The original garden was also small and simple and the only survivor from those early days was a camphor laurel on the northern corner of the house. Over the years, a further 45 ac adjoining property was added to the farm. Percy Meldrum designed the stables and dairy complex, which were built out of stone from Moorooduc Quarry. The ironwork was rescued from the  demolished Caulfield stables and had originally been imported from England.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 111Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 094In 1930, Edna Walling was employed to make 2 walled gardens for fruit trees and roses, but they are now used for herbaceous borders and a swimming pool respectively.  Elisabeth was responsible for the design of the majority of the garden and did much of the planting, along with her Head Gardener, Michael Morrison, who has worked there since 1971.

In 1944, a huge fire through the NE corner of the property burnt a large number of trees and shrubs, including some of the iconic avenue of Lemon-Scented Gums (Eucalyptus citriodora), planted by Elisabeth down the driveway. The missing trees were replaced and linked to existing Melaleuca stypheloides with other native plants. The plantings and layout were simplified. In 1987, a lake was added in the undulating paddock east of the house. A deep dam was created to supplement the water supply in 1997 and both bodies of water attract lots of birds and are surrounded by daffodils in Spring.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 116 A variety of oaks surround the lake and were planted from acorns collected by Elisabeth’s grand-daughters.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 126Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 127

Dame Elisabeth Murdoch died in 2012 at 103 years old. The 54 ha estate was transferred within Cruden Custodian Limited in 2014. It is used for a large number of community and charity events, including jazz concerts, family fun days and open garden days twice a month from 10am-2pm. The next open days are on 23 – 24 June and 28 – 29 July 2016. See:  Groups and individuals can also visit the garden for $20 pp.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 118Design

Temperatures vary between 20 and 45 degrees Celsius, 762 mm rain and sandy loam soil;

Lemon-Scented Gum avenue, planted in 1930s by Elisabeth;

Lawn dotted with mature trees including oaks. National Trust has classified a giant weeping oak; andBlog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 082Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 095Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 083Herbaceous borders and shrub walks including magnolias and azaleas, wisteria and blossom trees.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 076Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 078Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 080Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 079Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 131I loved all the mature old climbers, wreathing the buildings;Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 115Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 119The vegetable garden;Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 090The picking garden: for roses and perennials for the house: reds, pinks, mauves, yellows and creams, including the yellow and crimson Dame Elisabeth Murdoch rose (photo 2);Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 088Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 122Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 086Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 091Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 120Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 085

The walled gardens

: the walled garden, originally designed for fruit trees, was too hot for them and now contains twin English-style herbaceous borders of pink, mauve and yellow perennials and climbers lasting 4-5 months, as well as a statue ‘Dancing Brolga’ by Lesley Bowles. One espaliered apple remains from the original garden.

: the lower walled garden, which was originally designed for roses, is now a swimming pool;

Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 099Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 104Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 098Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 105Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 110Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 097and the sculptures

: Daedalus : Edwin Fabian : just inside the entrance

: Pisces : Douglas Stephen : 2 dolphins embracing: corner to east of walled garden

: Shiva 4 : Lenton Parr : on edge of native garden near the tennis court

Ibis : Phil Price, NZ : on peninsula jutting into the lake : gift from her children to Elisabeth on her 100th birthday.Blog PHGPT2 50%Reszddec 2009 117

Next month, I will be featuring some beautiful private country gardens in Victoria.

 

Favourite Gardens Regularly Open to the Public : Sculpture Gardens

I love sculpture in the garden! There is something about sculpture, which lends itself to open spaces. Perhaps, it is the form and texture, especially when made of natural materials like wood and stone, that blends in so well with the natural landscape.

While they are perfect as focal points in the garden, directing the eye and enhancing corners, I also love visiting gardens which are totally devoted to sculptures – for example, the McClelland Sculpture Gallery, Victoria, and Fleurty’s Café, Tasmania, as well as sculpture shows like Lorne and Bermagui. This lovely bronze sculpture, ‘First Flight’ by Albert Bruce Joy (1842-1924), provides a focal point in the garden of Overbecks Museum in Salcombe, Devon.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (150)Sculptures can be made of a wide variety of materials from natural wood and stone to the traditional bronze, iron and other metals; brightly coloured plastics; and recycled machinery parts or just plain junk! They can be monochrome or brightly coloured; static or moving; enormous or tiny; and private or public. It is fascinating seeing what can be created, especially with recycled material,  and can provide much amusement, as well as appreciation.BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-21 11.51.40BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0599BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-21 11.49.29BlogSculpture20%Reszd2016-05-22 11.49.33BlogSculpture20%ReszdIMG_0601In this post, I will be exploring a wide variety of ‘sculpture gardens’, from their use as focal decorative points of the garden, as well as functional use, to collective sculpture gardens, walks and shows; and from traditional forms to more contemporary modern applications. I will also feature a few sculptors as well. It is also worth revisiting some of my older posts, which have featured other sculpture gardens like Heide; Werribee and Carrick Hill. See: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/02/09/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-historic-homes-and-gardens/ .

Yengo , 8 Queens Avenue, Mt. Wilson, NSW

Open daily during Spring (October/November) and Autumn (April/May), otherwise weekends 10am-6pm or by appointment

$10 adults; $8 Seniors and $3 for children

I will start with Yengo in Mt. Wilson, a garden, which epitomizes the use of traditional bronze sculptures in the garden as focal points, as well as for just sheer beauty. The property was first bought by Jesse Gregson in 1877 and he spent the next 2 years building a stone house and developing an alpine  garden with the help of the Director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, Charles Moore, and the government botanist, Joseph Henry Maiden. The house and garden have been restored by the owners, Peter and Ann Piggot, whom we met on our visit to Mt Wilson, back in 1998.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (149)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (147)It is a beautiful garden with some very old evergreen trees, planted in 1880, including several Himalayan Deodars; Western Red Cedars from America; a Sequoia; a Cedar of Lebanon and a Spanish Cork.  There are also some beautiful deciduous trees, including Dogwoods and over 60 varieties of Japanese Maples; tall old tree ferns; banks of rhododendrons and azaleas and drifts of bluebells in Spring; mature wisteria and clematis; a walled garden and many beautiful ponds and water features.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (148)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (144) The garden is enhanced by and showcases some very beautiful, traditional bronze sculptures, made by English-based sculptors Lloyd le Blanc (animals : eg gazelles; a brolga fountain and a lyrebird) and Judith Holmes Drewry (portraits and the female form).

BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (139)BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (122) Many of the scupltures are for sale and range in price from $1700 to $50,000. They also have their own sculpture garden and gallery at: http://www.leblancfineart.com/judith-holmes-drewry/bronze-sculpture-of-figures-life-size/index.html.BlogSculpture50%ReszdImage (141)

Gourmet chef and hotelier, Raymond  Blanc, of Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons , Great Milton, Oxfordshire, UK  (http://www.raymondblanc.com/restaurants-cookery-school/le-manoir-aux-quatsaisons/) also loves their work, which you can see at: http://www.leblancfineart.com/le-manoir-aux-quat-saisons.html.