The October Garden

Well! What a month it has been! The mid-Spring garden has more than compensated for its late start and even though the temperatures are cooler than usual, the days are still sunny. There was an excellent fall of snow on the mountains last week – now that all the ski lifts have closed! The photos below were taken on our trips to Canberra on the 19th (first photo) and 23rd October (last 2 photos) this past week. It was actually snowing in Nimmitabel on Sunday!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0030blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0262blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0007 The cooler weather has prolonged the flowering season of many of the early Spring blooms, including bluebells under the crab apple tree, tulips (early October), hellebores and clivias.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0210blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-11-16-38blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0130blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0280 The trees have all just about gained their new foliage for the season, the poplars being the last trees to come into leaf, and the plums have finished flowering, while the crab apples are in their final days (photos 3 to 5).blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1893blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1902blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-09-08-14blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-26-00blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0116 The cockatoos (photos 3 and 4) and king parrots loved the blossoms- a bit crazy really, as they are depleting their future fruit source! The latter (photo 2) also love to graze the weeds in the vegie garden, as does the white-faced heron (photo 1)!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0300blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0279blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0024 blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0013The apples have luscious white blooms and are setting fruit already.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0111blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-11-02-22blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0119 Meantime, the loquat fruits are turning yellow, attracting king parrots and bowerbirds by day and possums and fruit bats at night, the latter occasionally waking us up with their skirmishes. I don’t think we humans will get much of a look in when it comes to the fruit!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0142blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1821 At least, the white mulberries are starting to ripen and the blueberries and raspberries are in flower.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0182blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0147blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0229 We have been feasting on delicious organic strawberries from our new bed, though I suspect a slug may also have been, as the wire guards preclude attack by birds or rabbits!blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-11-03-15blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0162 The rhubarb has also provided delicious desserts and I have been substituting angelica leaves for the sugar, at least in the fruit part of rhubarb and apple crumble- a great success!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0106blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0107 We have been enjoying our own home-grown onions, lettuce, rainbow chard and baby spinach from the vegetable garden.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-38-20blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-11-54-39I also made another batch of cumquat marmalade from the 1 kg fruit we harvested. I would strongly advise NOT to combine blogging with jam making, but I think I just got away with it. Even  though the marmalade is darker than usual, it set brilliantly! Fortunately, the cumquat trees are still covered in lots of new blooms. I love their sweet scent as we walk past them. The Michelia has almost finished flowering too, but the Weigela next door has now replaced it.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0199blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-16-43-08blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1691 Initially, its blooms opened white and I was a little disappointed, as I had bought it as a pink weigela to complement the pink flowering currant on the other side of the pergola entrance. I thought that the plant must have been mislabelled, but to my great delight, the blooms then turned a soft pink, deepening in intensity as they age. This plant is so pretty with its colour variations! The second photo below is my neighbour’s pure white weigela.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-16-33-07blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1850blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1692 Unfortunately, the flowering currant did not flower this year (with all its moves!), but it is doing well and the snowball tree behind it has masses of lime-green, turning white, globular blooms.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0096blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0088blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0090blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0238blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0299 The choisya has a mass of white starry flowers, which look very similar to the blooms of the citrus trees behind it.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0116-2 The Carolina Allspice has a number of buds this year, as has the Philadelphus virginalis, and I am keen to see the form of the latter’s blooms, as when it first bloomed last year, the flowers were the correct double form, but I did find some single ones later on, which could be root stock. We will just have to wait and see! On our recent trip to the Southern Highlands, we bought a Belle Etoile Philadelphus, with large single very fragrant flowers, which we have planted next to the old lilac on the fence. Ross has cut an archway between the bamboos and a path behind the large stand to access this part of the garden.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1907blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0209-2blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0205The blackbird has finished nesting in the bamboo, but a magpie has been very busy creating her brooding chamber high in the top of the Pepperina tree.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1861blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0346Our new Katherine Havermeyer lilac is a delight and is growing and blooming well.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-11-44-53 The Chaenomeles are still throwing out the odd bloom and the red rhododendron and white azalea are in full bloom, though we will probably move the azalea into a less shaded situation after it has finished flowering. My Grevillea ‘Lady X’ is perpetually in flower (last photo)!blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-38-58blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-24-22blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-20-25blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-23-30blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0298blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0251 Unlike the azalea, the Viburnum plicatum however appears to be thriving in full shade and we also bought two different hostas- Peter Pan and Allan P Mc Connell- from Moidart Nursery, near Bowral, to fill out this shady nook.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-21-38 I also discovered some Winter Aconite Eranthis hyemalis there- very expensive, as it is very difficult to source here in Australia- in fact, this is the only place I have ever seen it- and I may also let it run riot here among the snowdrops, though initially will put it in the treasure bed until I am sure it germinates next year! Here are the treasures we brought home!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1682blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0164 We also bought some blue primroses, a lovely deep blue auricula (photo 3), Pulsatilla vulgaris, Rhodohypoxis baurii (photo 4), a variegated Arabis procurrens and Azorella trifurcata to fill out the gaps in this bed as the grape hyacinth die down- I love their little seed pods (photo 2)! We planted the new plants in the treasure bed yesterday morning.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1684blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1974blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0291blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0245 The Lily of the Valley (photo 1) are also up and the Rosalie Geranium has returned. The Acanthus soldiers and blue Convovulus mauritanicus (photo 2) are on the march nearby. blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0054blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0211-2I love the pattern and form of the Acanthus, the photos below showing why their common name is Oyster Plant, and their colour really compliments the house walls. blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1837blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1834 The Garden beds have been such a treat this Spring!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0097-2blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0136blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0145blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0158blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0255 The Cutting Garden is a delight with lots of clear royal blue, pale hyacinth blue, bright gold and clean white Dutch Iris and blue cornflowers, forming a backdrop to the bright intense jewel-like ranunculus. Such a treat!blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-39-55blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1786blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-10-58-52blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0224blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0120blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0216-2blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0121blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0322blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-15-50-24 The beautifully-scented freesias (photo 1) have just about finished, but the nigella amongst it is in bud. I suspect they are the self-seeded progeny of last year’s lime-green variety (photo 2), rather than the new blue nigella, which we sowed last Autumn. The foxglove is in bloom again, its flowers displaying a similar habit to the weigela- white turning pink, from the base up (photos 3 and 4)!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0250blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0312blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0284blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0285 The Iceland Poppies from last year also self-seeded, producing white, gold and orange blooms. So stunning and long-lasting when cut.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-11-19-09blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-29-11-18-56 Here are more photos of the individual ranunculus blooms.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0091blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-30-15-41-43blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0124blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-15-51-18blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-10-16-11-36blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-28-54The Soho Bed  is such a picture and there is very little bare ground to be seen! I am a bit eclectic when it comes to style and colour, but somehow the jumble of colours seems to work – in my eyes anyway!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0204blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0210blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0240blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0067 The loyal wallflowers have been joined by a variety of other mauves and purples in the catmint, the wild poppies and the stunning Italian Lavender; blue forget-me-knot; pink thrift and verbena and gold highlights in the old gold bearded iris and now the geum.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-40-06blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-18-16-32blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1731blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0263blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0055blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0073blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0078 The bees, both honey bees and native bees, and butterflies are in heaven!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1924blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1911blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1908blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1946blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1926 Here are two Spring vases from the garden!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0330blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0133 The Moon Bed is also very beautiful with soft mauve bearded iris, rescued from the heavy shade of the cumquat trees and transplanted to the new Moon Bed, where they can recapture the glory of their flowering period.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0098blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0222blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-30-17 We did not know what colour they would be, so waited with baited breath as their blooms slowly opened. We were delighted with their dreamy colour, Ross’s favourite, and one which really suits the Moon Bed, while the gold bearded iris are perfect in our sunny Soho Bed!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0095blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-30-17 The blue salvia, yellow Paris daisies and day lilies and pink peony (1st photo below) are all growing madly and the roses all have fat buds and are just about to open! SO exciting! November is going to be heavenly! Even the roses from my cuttings last year are in bud! The second photo below shows the blooms of a white tree paeony Paeonia suffruticosa, which we saw at Red Cow Farm on our recent trip to the Southern Highlands , promptly purchasing a seedling, which we will plant at the bottom of the steps next to the pergola and the Philadelphus next Autumn! I will be describing this trip in more detail in my Favourite Gardens post in December.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0241blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1063blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1064 The highlight of the October roses has been the Yellow Banksia, R. banksia lutea, over the outdoor eating area. I can safely report it has now fully recovered from its drastic initial haircut and has been a mass of bright gold and softer lemon blooms!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1904blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-11-39-16blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0289blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0079 The Spirea on the fence nearby has also been a mass of blooms, but is now finishing off, while the honeysuckle is set to take over.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-09-30-11-06-22 blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0168blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0211The white banksia rose, R.banksiae alba plena, on the bottom future chook fence, has also been in full bloom, as has its partner, the Jasmine, Jasminium polyanthum.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-08-11-02-02blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-09-11-53-04 I think both of them are vigorous enough to compete with each other, as I have seen two instances out and about this Spring- a wall covered in yellow banksia and potato vine and an old pergola obliterated by a white banksia, a jasmine and a snail creeper!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1758blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0828 The Rugosas have also been beautiful, scenting the air round the vegie garden: in order, Frau Dagmar Hastrup, Mme Georges Bruant and Roseraie de L’Hay.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0109blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0262blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0295Mutabilis and Stanwell Perpetual have also had their first blooms.blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-37-35blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-37-29My birthday Souvenir de la Malmaison appears to like her position in the middle of the pergola and her first blooms have been dreamy, though this particular lady does not like wet weather and has a tendency to ball, which is why she is in the middle rather than the more prominent ends of the pergola!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1852blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0089 Here are some other early starters in order:  Just Jude (2 photos); Viridiflora; Lamarque; Alister Stella Grey; Adam; Evelyn; Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose (2 photos); Countess Bertha; and Château de Clos Vougeot (2 photos).blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0017blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0261blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0320blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0241blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-26-26blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0226blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0223blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1819blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0023blogoctgarden20reszd2016-10-11-12-27-04blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0247blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0160 My climbing Cécile Brünner (1st photo) on the front arch is just starting to bloom, a late small camellia beside her mirroring her form and colour (2nd photo).blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0209blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0248Spring is such a wonderful season! It’s hard dividing my time between the garden, blogging, cooking and sewing!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0075blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0070-2 I did finally finish assembling the small Spring cushions, helped my daughter make a bag and baked a delicious sponge for my husband’s birthday in mid-October.blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0097blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0367And we have had visitors: Oliver and his son, Fagan, who miss the budgies (who have moved to my daughter’s flat) or probably more accurately, their bird seed!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1978blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1995blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1980 A brush-tailed possum, who wants to set up residence in the roof of the shed;blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1800 And finally, some Shetland ponies, who give rides to kids at the monthly markets and who are currently doing the rounds of Candelo, mowing lawns and paddocks in exchange for free feed! It’s such a great idea!blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0353blogoctgarden20reszdimg_0083blogoctgarden20reszdimg_1831

The September Garden

It’s such an exciting month in the garden, as it is just waking up from its long Winter sleep. Every day, I look for new discoveries – fresh leaf, new blossom and the emergence of long-lost bulbs and perennials, which have disappeared over Winter. By the end of the month, the garden is positively exploding with fresh colour!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-10-27-36blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-40-24blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-13-19blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-13-14-39We have been fortunate to get good rain to start the growing season , the frosts have almost finished and the sunny days are getting longer and longer.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-08-49-57blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-09-35-29 The crab apple is in full bloom and beat the white prunus this year, though the latter quickly caught up and now dominates the garden by its sheer size!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-39-35blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-38-10 We were really thrilled to see the bluebells in bud under the crab apple !blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-11-02-25blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-11-02-48 The white mulberry and the maples have new leaf and buds forming, as have a number of the shrubs like the new pink weigela and spireae and viburnum, the latter two now opening up.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-13-15-21blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-12-12-11-13blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-36-43The garden is experiencing the changing of the guard from the final blooms of Winter honeysuckle and daphne to the yellow banksia rose and white maybush;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-23-23blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-23-35The violets to the new maple leaf and bulbs of the treasure garden in early September,blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-02-18-38-02blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-19-00-04blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-15-21-56 the latter in turn to be supplanted by the cutting garden as the month progressed;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-11-05-26 The pink violets to the red grevillea, Lady X;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-14-11-36-09 The japonicas, camellias and hellebores to the exochorda, lilacs, red rhododendron and roses; blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-50-13blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-35-46blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-33-13 blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-16-28-01The deep red hellebore finally got its act together with a late show of flowers.blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1147The roses have been shooting new leaves proliferously and the early roses are in bud: Chateau de Clos Vougeot (photo below) is the most advanced this year; the Banksia rose and Fortuneana are set to explode and we have new buds on Viridiflora and Countess Bertha,  Alister Stella Gray,  Stanwell Perpetual and Mutabilis,  Adam and the new Souvenir de la Malmaison.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-17-22-03Along the back path, the lilies are shooting madly, the acanthus has new flower spikes and the Italian lavender and daisies are in full bloom.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-10-32blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-15-16-51-28blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-12-41-11The sunny heads of the calendula complement the bright golden laburnum nearby.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-10-53blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-08-48-49The Peony has finally surfaced, as have the Snakes’ Head Fritillaries, whose pendant buds have such a distinctive chequerboard pattern. Here is the bud opening over the week.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-24-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-23-18-28-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-09-54-55A sole blossom on Narcissus panizzianus (1st photo below) has joined the clivea buds, which have opened into clear orange bells.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-00-56blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-10-30-52 The Cutting Garden is gaining more and more colour every day.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-13-14blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-46-36 blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-18-00-06We started the season with Bokassa Gold and Clusiana species tulips, which are now guarded by wire cages, since their first bloom (photo 2) was decapitated by the bower birds!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-13-32-44blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-13-02-15blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-09-17-39-14blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-13-30-16 The tulips are now in full steam. In order, two photos of each : Lily Tulips Claudia and Synaeda Orange; Destiny Parrot Tulip; Bokassa Red and Verandi; and pale pink Monet Tulips.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-12-11-42-43blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-24-33blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-45-55blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-09-13-55-35blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-54blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-04blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-12-30blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-11-52blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-16-46-27blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-11-32blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-12-46-49blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-13-13-47 In the daffodil row, Golden Dawn and Winter Sun have been joined by the delicate Actaea and luscious Acropolis.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-16-14-30blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-05-16-14-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-44-11blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-10-59-57 The divinely-scented freesias have finally opened, as well as a few blue  cornflower blooms and  a golden Iceberg Poppy from last year.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-23-18-31-29blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-10-32-54blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-14-11-24-48blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-34-43 And our first ranunculus is in bloom!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-12-47-51We labelled all the daffodil and tulip bulbs, so that when their foliage dies, I can transplant them to new areas around the garden.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-21-11-05-26In the Soho Bed, the loyal Wallflowers are now joined by pink verbena blooms, Italian Lavender, pink thrift and recovering catmint , as well as masses of sweet little forget-me-knots. We have even had our first wild poppy!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-10-27-55blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-18-13-25-34blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-13-13-58blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-10-56-33blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-17-11-41-23blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-22-10-38-23 We still need to thin out the peony poppies, which self-seeded from last year’s crop, but we have done the deed in the hand-sown bed, so it is looking much more ordered!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-18-17-18 Ross made a separate strawberry bed behind the peony poppies. blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-18-17-24 We weeded the Moon Bed.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-07-11-06-53 Ross has also done lots of work in the vegetable garden, including making protective wire guards. He has also potted new cuttings and planted out the rose cuttings, which were struck last year.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-09-36-14I too have been busy! In early September, I made a second batch of Spring bulb cushion panels, as well as some based on spring blossom and tulips, to keep me occupied until the garden started exploding in Spring growth. It is such an exciting time of year!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-00-16blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-11-18-36-17blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-10-14-00The birds are also loving the Spring! The female blackbird has made a nest in the giant bamboo, well away from the neighbourhood cats, but her mate still keeps a watchful eye on proceedings!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-09-54-36blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-14-46-05The male bower bird is in full decorating mode in his attempts to impress a mate! We caught him in the act, plucking a blue cornflower, the colour complementing his violet-blue eyes!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-25-09-50-40The Red-browed Firetail Finches and Eastern Spinebills are loving the insect life in the fresh new foliage.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-09-55-02blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-23-41blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-14-23-30The Silvereyes, Crimson Rosellas, King Parrots, and Satin Bowerbirds are feasting on the blossom!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-19-10-46-59blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-17-43-44 The latter two are also testing out the ripeness of the loquat fruit on a daily basis.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-17-15-44blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-18-06-12blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-18-08-04 It’s lovely to watch the parrots grazing in amongst the bluebells, the grass kept unmown for the bulbs, though I still hate it when the birds (I blame the bowerbirds!) cut off flower heads and new growth! Even the roses and grevillea have been attacked!blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-08-46blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-16-08-34 And if that weren’t enough food, there is always grain to scavenge from my daughter’s budgie cage on the verandah! These birds are such characters!

blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-17-56-03
Do you think we should?
blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-17-57-31
What are they up to?
blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-17-57-49
Got it!
blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-17-59-13
I only have eyes for you!
blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-20-17-58-05
Lean pickings!
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A very handsome bird!

Finally, a few photos of special moments this first month of Spring… a spider web caught in the dew;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-10-06-25blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-04-10-07-10 a new sun for my daughter’s birthday;blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-08-51-50blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-06-08-52-27 a rising moon and a beautiful fluffy sunset cloud.blogsept-garden20reszd2016-09-13-19-35-58blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1084blogsept-garden20reszdimg_1091

The January Garden

What a wonderful Summer we have been enjoying! Perfect temperatures in the late-20s with some mid-30s and the odd scorcher above 40 degrees Celsius, as well as Summer storms and beautiful rain, resulting in flooded creeks and river beds early in the new year. It is always good to see a decent amount of water in Candelo Creek and the birds love it! I couldn’t catch the fast-flying reed warblers, but I did see this gorgeous swamp hen on her grassy platform, which was at the back right of the large central island in the 2nd photo.

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Looking down Candelo Creek from the bridge
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Looking up Candelo Creek from the bridge

BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 10.02.51There has been so much growth in the garden! The stems of the climbing roses on the Main Pergola are so long and are urging its immediate construction! We ordered 4 freshly-cut, 3.2 m long stringybark posts yesterday, so the roses and I can’t wait for the building to start!BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 10.06.23Ross also wired up Lamarque, the climbing rose on the front wall of the house, to train its increasingly wayward canes, as well as making a raspberry trellis at the back of the northern vegie patch. We will transplant all the new canes to the vacant half of the trellis this Winter, so have sowed some multi-coloured sweet pea seed for a last crop in Autumn.

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Educating Lamarque!
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Ross sowing Sweet Pea seeds under the new raspberry trellis

We also planted some very special dahlia seeds given to us by a dear friend. I can’t wait to see the colour combinations in Autumn. While Ross was sowing seed, I collected the bupleurium seed.

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Planting the special Dahlia seed
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Bupleurium seedhead

When we were ordering the pergola posts, we also picked up 50 old red bricks, so we were able to complete the brick edging around the Moon Bed. It looks terrific and will make maintenance so much easier. I would really like to edge the Soho Bed in a similar fashion, though we might have to use smaller broken bricks on their ends because of the continuous curve of the circle.

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Ross laying the brick edging of the Moon Bed
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I didn’t even notice Ross’s deviation joke!!!

We have also done lots of watering, weeding and mulching throughout the month, not to mention giving that rampant pumpkin a severe haircut!!!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5799BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_6747BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5490All Ross’s hard work in the garden is now paying off! Even though the potato plants have struggled, we still had a good crop and we are harvesting red and gold heritage tomatoes every day. We made a second batch of Wild Plum Jam and more Basil Pesto.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5146BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_4529BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5131BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5733BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.13.20We feast on delicious fresh salads, divine home-made pesto and tasty pizzas for lunch! The pizzas were made with our own onion, tomatoes, capsicum, basil and pesto.

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All home-grown except for the eggs!!!

BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5406The plums have been superb! We have been eagerly awaiting the ripening of the large purple plums and after a spell of warm days, we harvested 2 buckets worth. We kept a third of the ripest to eat for breakfast, then experimented with 2 different recipes : http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/11891/dolous+dark+plum+jam and http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/backyard-plum-jam. Both have similar ingredients, but their method and timing differ. The first probably set better than the 2nd, but both are delicious and we now have 15 jars of divine Plum Jam for our pantry. And there are still more plums on the tree!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5849

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Ingredients for Plum Jam : Plums, water, sugar and lemon juice. I didn’t end up using the limes, as I had enough juice from the old lemons in the tub!

BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5794Our neighbour’s pear tree also has a bumper crop!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5782We have had plenty of avian visitors to the garden, keeping a close eye on the ripening of the fruit. We have chased off a number of raiding parties of Sulphur-crested Cockatoos.

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Yum-a-Plum!!!
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This smart cookie was cleaning up the fallen plums underneath the tree
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Munching on plums
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This bird definitely needs a bib!!!

Oliver and Twist have been regular visitors to the verandah. They seem to like our company and chatter away to us, good-naturedly accepting our less-than-perfect-host behaviour by refusing to feed them! They like nibbling away at the fresh winged seeds of the nearby maple.

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I love the under-colours of the female King Parrots!
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Twist on the verandah
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Oliver is the more confident of the two!
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Oliver sheltering from the rain
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A Maple seed feast

The Crimson Rosellas are also enjoying the Duranta berries and at least one of them has been led astray by Oliver and has tried joining him on the verandah!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5316BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 14.39.03

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Crimson Rosellas also have beautiful colours underneath!

We even have a young Butcher-Bird, much to the alarm of the other bird parents.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5298The January garden is full of flowers! We have been so impressed with the pink sweet peas, which despite their late start, have positively exploded and are enjoying a long season!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5213BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5216The Burgundy sunflowers are equally impressive for their colour, boldness and vigour, producing many many flower heads.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5166

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Sunflowers after rain

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This bloom literally glows!
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Caroline’s wonderful watercolour painting also looks alive!
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The geometric form of the new blooms is stunning!

The dahlias are still brightening up the cutting garden with their generosity, as are the calendulas.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5487

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This wet dahlia bud has a metallic glow!

They have been joined by exotic scarlet, gold, orange and pink zinnias. Their colours are so intense, as is the purple of the cosmos.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_6764BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_6766BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_6741BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_6650BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5831BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 17.32.17The Tree Dahlias have surpassed the shed roof and the corner of the house is a mass of blue and mauve hydrangea mopheads. They are my monthly feature plant for February!BlogHydrangeas20%ReszdIMG_5331BlogHydrangeas20%ReszdIMG_5333The agapanthus provide a sea of blue to cool the senses on the really hot days.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5221And the roses continue to romance us! The Moon Bed looks so pretty with it soft pink, cream and gold David Austin roses.

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Golden Celebration
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Heritage
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Troilus
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Lucetta

The Soho Bed is also undergoing a fresh burst of blooms.

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Lolita
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Just Joey
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Ice Girl
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Mr. Lincoln

The climbers are also throwing out fresh blooms.

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Devoniensis
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An older bloom of Devoniensis
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Mme Alfred Carrière
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Alister Stella Gray

My rose cuttings from last Winter are thriving and their roots have reached the base of their 2nd larger pots already, so we have decided to plant them out in their final positions over the next few weeks to make the most of the growing season.

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Planting cuttings of Mme Isaac Pereire and Fantin Latour on the shed fence
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Planting the species rose : R. foetida bicolor on the bottom fence
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The Reve d’Or cutting has a flower
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The Leander cutting also has a bloom

The diversity of the insect world in the garden continues to astound us. We discovered the culprit, which defoliated our potato plants : the larvae of the 28-spotted ladybird (Epilachna vigintoctopunctata). It appears that not all ladybirds are good!!!BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 17.27.51BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.15.13BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 19.37.34These red beetles were much more attractive, but had little impact on either the pumpkins or the sunflowers!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5121BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.06.51These beetles were mating on rhubarb leaves.BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.10.56I love the jewel-like beetles on the raspberry below. One could almost forgo that berry for their beauty!But not our precious cumquats for the 2016 marmalade season!BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.18.18

Our stink bugs continue to thwart Ross’s efforts to eliminate them!  Unfortunately, their awful smell cancels out any benign thoughts or appreciation of their own unique beauty!

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The Cumquat Battle
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Post-War breeding!
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First of the Baby Boomers!
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Almost armour-plated!

This little moth is in heaven!

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Heritage Moth (as in rose!)

The handsome Orchard Butterfly is back, flitting heavily from the buddleias to the Soho Bed.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5625BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5599There are some stunning wasps and spiders.BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.28.02BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.30.32BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 15.20.28These cute little grasshoppers are hopefully behaving themselves!

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His antennae extend beyond the photo edge!
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Ready for Lift-Off!!!

Summer also means lots of beautiful bouquets for the house!

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Dahlias, Catmint and Sweet Peas
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Monbretia, Calendulas, Poppies, Feverfew, Blue Salvia and Stock
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Sweet Peas, Stock and Catmint

And it’s been so wonderful having our daughter here on holidays. Lots of exploring our beautiful local area, as well as relaxing at home. Caroline always enjoys sewing when she visits and made this beautiful cushion- the pattern sourced from : http://cluckclucksew.com/2011/03/tutorial-sprocket-pillows.html.

We actually made it a little larger, so she could use it as a floor cushion. We had a quick impromptu lesson on tassel-making from the habadashery lady, as she had no gold tassels in stock, then Caro made all 12 from gold embroidery thread within half an hour! I was very impressed!!! We had even more fun attaching the central buttons! Having pulled both buttons together tight, we were trying to hide the thread end and actually lost the entire needle inside the cushion!!! Fortunately, we were able to retrieve it and disaster was averted!!!BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-16 20.21.33BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-16 20.21.06Caro has also had a lot of fun with her watercolours. Having had a lesson from her friend on the way over, she really developed her technique over the holidays. She loves painting animals, especially in quirky or fantastical  situations. Here is some of her work!BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5802BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 15.48.43BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_6652BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-11 18.47.42BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5464

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Christmas!

Christmas has always been a very special time in our house, especially the lead up in the month beforehand, with all the food preparation, gift making and present wrapping!

I have already written posts about :

  • Desserts for Pre-Christmas work parties : The Sweet Spot (October)
  • Christmas Cake and Pudding (November)
  • Christmas Drinks and Nibbles (December)

I much prefer to think about Christmas gifts well in advance, so there is no panic closer to the day, when the shops get so busy and crowded and choosing gifts becomes very stressful!!! If time allows, it is a wonderful opportunity to use all those craft skills and, at the same time, make so many people very happy! Home-made presents are THE BEST and are appreciated long after their store-bought equivalents. The recipient not only appreciates the originality and sometimes quirkiness of your gift, but also the talent and skill involved and the sheer amount of time devoted to their production, while thinking about their recipient during the whole process! My family adore my embroidered cushion covers and I get much joy out of planning and executing their design, as well as admiring the finished product, and then seeing the joy and love they bring to their recipient!

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I made this cute Christmas bag for my daughter from a pattern in ‘Scandinavian Stitches‘ by Kajsa Wikman. See her blog on : http://syko.typepad.com/.

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I embroidered this cushion cover with rainforest birds for my husband’s birthday this year.BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-10-29 16.34.36A Christmas tablemat for 2000!

I have loved all my children’s home-made gifts over the years and our house and lives have been enriched by all their wonderful creations! It is also a great way for children to develop their creative skills. Here are some great books with gift ideas :

‘The Good Gift Guide : Creative Gift Giving For All Occasions’ by Alison Pearl

‘The Good Gift Book : Ideal Presents For Every Occasion’ by Judy Hubbard

‘A Touch of Christmas : Easy To Make Stockings and Gifts’ by Pamela Allardice

‘Christmas Treats To Make and Give’ by Linda Collister

‘Homemade’ by Kay Fairfax

‘Creating Gourmet Gifts’ by Barbara Beckett

‘Aromatic Gifts : Scented Ideas From Kitchen and Garden’ by Stephanie Donaldson        and

‘Beautiful Homemade Presents’ by Juliet Bawden.

Gifts can be more intangible too : a massage, a song, a performance, an IOU promise. My daughters made this hand-painted Monopoly board and these delightful wooden coasters for past Christmas gifts. A friend made this delicious Christmas cookie decoration one year.BlogCreativity120%Reszd2015-10-13 15.25.37BlogCreativity120%Reszd2015-10-13 15.12.40BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-10-13 16.32.04I really enjoy making Christmas cards and Advent Calendars in late November, the latter to be opened from the 1st December on. The last few years, I have used folded blank card, stamps and ink pads to create much more personal (and far cheaper) cards! Alas, this year, because I worked right up until the last week, I had to resort to using commercial Christmas cards!

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There are so many different patterns for advent calendars from felt pockets with little treasures and sweets to this wonderful paper pocket Christmas Tree, which I made for our 2013 Christmas. Each pocket held a small gift or a rhyming clue to a treasure hunt for larger items, which could not fit in the pocket. The pattern came from ‘Folded Secrets : Paper Folding Projects: Book 4’ by Ruth Smith and is based on the old Chinese Needle Thread Pockets. You can order all 4 books from the author by emailing her at : eruthsmith@btinternet.com. For a quick view of them, see : http://purplemissus.blogspot.com.au/2012/05/happy-families.html

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It is also fun making Christmas decorations throughout December, then finally decorating the Christmas tree in the last 2 weeks! Some people do it in early December, especially if they own an artificial tree, but I much prefer fresh trees, which do not last the whole month well.

I love the scent and colour of traditional fir trees, which are often sold on the side of the road in the weeks up until Christmas. After the 1967 Tasmanian bush fires, which devastated the native forests, my parents planted a large number of these quick-growing evergreens along the fence line of our property, only to spend every future Christmas chasing off would-be Christmas Tree thieves as the trees grew to maturity!!!

For the last few years in the city, we bought our trees from the same supplier, who harvested them from their country property then sold them in their suburban driveway. We’d select a small, well-balanced tree, then place it in a tub of water within an old rusty family cream can (from dairying days), decorated with Christmas wrapping paper and a large red bow. I love this old photo from the early 1900s of my husband’s grandparents’ Christmas tree with all the toy animals underneath.BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-10-29 16.33.46Back in the country, we would cut our own tree – maybe a feral cypress or a native she-oak (Casuarina) or even a gum tree (Eucalyptus). This year, we had hoped to purchase a Wollemi Pine in a pot, which we would keep outside during the year, then bring inside for Christmas until it grew too large. Wollemi pines are incredibly ancient and very special, as they were thought to be extinct until a small stand was discovered in 1994. See : http://www.wollemipine.com.

Alas, they were too exorbitant for us this year at $ 169 for a 150mm pot ( plus $14 for shipping and handling). I know we would probably recuperate the price after 3 to 5 years of buying ordinary cut Christmas trees, but you would have to be certain that the plant survived!!! Maybe when we’re rich and famous…!!! For those with disposable income, see : http://www.wollemipine.com/order.php

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It is always such fun decorating the Christmas tree with friends and family with all the old Christmas favourites, as well as a new purchase/ creation each year. After the baubles and ornaments, we drape the tree with tinsel, then last of all, the Christmas lights – so magical!!! Here are some photos of hand-made Christmas decorations: a simple, bright felt star for my eldest daughter’s first Christmas tree of her own; Christmas angels being made by my daughters : I made the middle angel, Caro the blonde angel and Jen, the angel with the dreadlocks!; I also made a beaded/ sequined and embroidered Christmas angel and pear one year.BloghappyXmas40%Reszdxmas 2009 004BlogCreativity120%Reszd2015-04-22 08.59.48 - CopyBloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-10-13 14.31.53BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-10-13 14.34.34We were a bit late putting up our ‘tree’ this year, but it was just as well as the weekend before Christmas we experienced 40 degree days! We now live on a corner block fringed with very old Cypress trees, so we cut 5 branches, which were extending into the lane way, then bound them together and put them in the old family cream can. I think it looks great and it’s hard to detect that it is not a complete tree! My daughter made a beautiful wreath with the trimmed branches as well (bottom photo).BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-19 20.26.16BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-19 21.38.59BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-19 19.28.22BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-19 18.26.23And finally, Christmas Eve has arrived! When we lived in the ‘Big Smoke’, we always use to enjoy making a special visit into the city to see the Christmas decorations.

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I loved the illumination of the Geelong Town Hall last year.BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2014-12-18 22.19.05And on the night of Christmas Eve, it was always worth doing the rounds of the neighbourhood to view all those outrageous Christmas decorations and lights. Some streets specialize in it!!!BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2012-12-24 22.51.01BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2012-12-24 22.22.36There were even still a few here in country Candelo! While the 3rd photo took the prize for effect, I must admit that I much prefer the simpler more discrete ones like the hammock shot (4th photo). Someone had even draped a large fir tee in their front yard with lights, which changed from green-and-blue to red-and-gold (5th and 6th photo)! A local farmer tied a big red bow round each of his fence posts, which looked really effective, though perhaps not so good at night-time! (1st and 2nd photo)BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-24 11.46.22BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-24 11.46.10BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-21 22.52.22BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-21 22.42.27BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-21 22.44.14BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2015-12-21 22.44.05It is always fun seeing everyone get into the Christmas spirit, including our old postman last year! We had a hilarious Christmas Eve a few years ago, when we came across a long line of ‘Father Christmases’,  university students on their way to the pub, who then very good-naturedly, carjacked us for a lift to said hotel!!! I think my daughter thought all her Christmases had come at once! We caught up to their companions and dropped them off, little realizing that one of them had lost his mobile phone in our car! Two suburbs later, we received a very sheepish phone call, asking us very politely if we would mind dropping their phone round to the hotel! So funny, though it did highlight how quickly a car can be hijacked!!!

BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2012-12-24 10.20.48BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2012-12-24 22.18.59This year here in Candelo, we were hijacked in a different fashion! I saw 3 Santas walking up the hill, only to have a large group of them materialize on our doorstep to sing us Christmas Carols, then we were bundled up and absorbed into the group, as we wended our way back up the hill to accost other suitable benefactors! My daughter grabbed her Santa hat and reindeer antlers, which she had bought for my neighbour’s handsome black labradors, whom she was to babysit over Christmas, but unfortunately not her camera, otherwise you would have had some classic shots of me in her  antlers with multicoloured flashing lights. It took me a while to realize that the faint Christmas jingle I kept hearing was also actually coming from  those same antlers!!! It probably would have been a bit dark for a decent photo anyway. We found it increasingly difficult to read the words by candlelight, so ‘Deck the Halls’ was very dodgy and thin in the verse singing, but voices swelled considerably in the ‘Fa-La-La, Fa-La-La, Fa-La-La’ chorus! We finished at the local bakery, where we were kindly given a fresh, warm sourdough loaf straight out of the oven and a lovely moist Christmas Cake, which we quickly wolfed down with French Champagne and tea back at my neighbour’s house. It was such a fun night and a great way to meet all the locals!

Father Christmas certainly gets around, as can be seen by these eye witness accounts on our drives to visit family interstate over the Christmas period!BloghappyXmas40%Reszdxmas 2009 013BloghappyXmas40%Reszdxmas 2009 043BloghappyXmas40%Reszddec 2010 073BloghappyXmas40%Reszdxmas 2009 072BloghappyXmas40%Reszdxmas 2009 071BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2014-12-14 08.13.18He is such a busy fellow and must get so exhausted with all his travels! We have a family tradition of writing Father Christmas notes to attach to our stockings. He would then have to reply in the wee wee hours of the morning in an increasingly illegible scrawl! Funny how he always knew what had transpired during the year! When the kids were little, we always used to visit him in the shopping mall, resulting in a wonderful family photographic record of the childhood years.

Every Christmas Eve, we would leave him a slice of Christmas, a beer and a carrot for his reindeer and in the morning, we would discover cake crumbs, the bottle drained and little bite-sized bits of carrot all over the garden.

The kids would be up so early on Christmas morning, excitedly opening their Christmas stockings or, in later years, sacks! After the stocking opening and a much-needed cup of tea, we took it in turns to open the gifts, which had accumulated under the tree in the previous 2 weeks and had suddenly swelled in number dramatically overnight. The youngest often had the job of finding each person’s gift, while Mum (usually) kept a note of ‘who gave what’ for later thank you correspondence.

After the last gift had been opened, the kids all gathered around the open window to yell at the top of their voices ‘Thank You Very Much, Father Christmas!’, a tradition carried through from my childhood!

Because everyone tends to nibble stocking fruit and sweets and are a bit exhausted by this stage, we often have a rest till mid-afternoon, then prepare for Christmas Dinner : a roast turkey with stuffing, a clove-studded ham, roast vegetables and the finale, the flaming Christmas Pudding! One year, when we had just moved over into a cottage built to lockup with no electricity, water or stove, the thought of preparing the traditional Christmas dinner overwhelmed me and it was so wonderful when my ‘kids’ (late teens by this stage) took over and bought 2 barbecued chickens and boiled up vegies over the camping gas stove – the most relaxing Christmas dinner we have ever had!BloghappyXmas40%ReszdIMG_9113BloghappyXmas40%Reszddecember2011 200

I love setting the Christmas table and organizing the flowers ! For a few years, we even made our own Christmas Crackers, complete with corny jokes!!! We will miss our dear Scampie this year!BloghappyXmas20%Reszd2012-12-25 11.00.35BloghappyXmas20%ReszdJens Xmas 2013 055

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Our old dog Scamp used to love Christmas!

I will leave you with a few photos of our iconic native flora and fauna. Happy Christmas and All our Best Wishes for a Wonderful 2016!!!

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A koala sitting in an old gum tree!
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Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
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Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo
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A pair of Pink Galahs
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A Pretty-faced Wallaby browsing a friend’s Bauhinias
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Illawarra Flame Tree (Brachychiton acerifolius)
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Native Frangipani (Hymenosporum flavum)
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Rainbow Lorikeets at home for Christmas!
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Oliver, our resident King Parrot, also at home for Christmas!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer’s Here!

I love the start of Summer! The warmer temperatures before it becomes too hot; the longer daylight hours, so you can still garden at the end of the day after work; the excitement of watching the fruit develop and ripen; and the amazing colours in the garden!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-26 16.40.36BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-26 16.40.27BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-26 16.41.26BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-26 16.41.36Roses love Summer too! Here are photos of the roses blooming this week :

In the Soho Bed :

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Lolita
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Mr Lincoln
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Fair Bianca
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Alnwick

In the Moon Bed :

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Windermere
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Golden Celebration
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Heritage
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William Morris

By the shed :

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Countess Bertha
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Archiduc Joseph

On the Main Pergola (desperately waiting for its construction and madly growing in the mean time!) :

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Devoniensis
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Devoniensis

And in the rose hedge behind the vegetable garden :

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Mutabilis

I love creating new bouquets from them all!

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Copper Queen, Blue Salvia and Catmint
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Heaven Scent, Copper Queen, Lolita, Just Joey, Icegirl, Dahlias and Salvia
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Alnwick, Windermere, Children’s Rose, Heaven Scent, Verbena and Catmint
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Closeup of first photo
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Calendulas and Cornflowers
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Left to right : Mr Lincoln, Icegirl and Lolita

The dahlias have blasted on to the scene with their eye-catching gold and red.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-22 17.18.07BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.54.02BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.53.47BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.52.32BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.52.05Their magnificent bold display is only matched in intensity by the scarlet pomegranate flower and the bright orange Calendulas. They are paving the way for the orange Monbretia later in the season.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 19.37.37BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-27 11.10.32BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.51.03BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.54.30Lily time is almost upon us. I expect these Madonna Lily buds will open next week. The blue and white Agapanthus (also known as ‘Lily of the Nile’) are forming great regiments to supersede the Acanthus, once it finally finishes. It is amazing how their giant heads can be contained within the cases of their tight buds.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-23 18.00.11BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.58.53BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 19.39.42Blue and white is also provided in the stocks and cornflowers of the Cutting Garden.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 19.36.36BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.48.28The growth in the Hydrangea corner is mind-blowing, especially when you consider how heavily we pruned them last Winter!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.58.05Nandina is in full bloom along the back path.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-23 19.12.41The Buddleias also responded very vigorously to their pruning with many beautiful purple, mauve and pink nectar-laden blooms for bees and butterflies to feast on. The scent in the air is beautiful!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.47.45BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-27 12.06.21BlogSummers here 30%Reszd2015-11-27 12.04.48 - Copy - CopyBlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-27 15.29.30BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-27 15.36.37BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-27 15.34.59BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-27 15.38.04The soft pastel blooms complement their grey-green foliage and wave gently against the bright blue sunny skies. However, these same pastel colours can also look very dramatic against a background of navy blue felt, as seen in this cushion cover I recently made for a friend’s birthday.photoBlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-13 08.55.34I based it on a fuchsia design, which I had made in a past lino-cutting class. The following photos show the whole process.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-07 21.10.49BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-13 08.45.07BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-12 22.36.13BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-13 08.54.30BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-13 08.54.38I also made her a matching card from the images, which I had googled and printed out to help me choose the felt colours, then laminated it. Yes, you can laminate an A4 card, so long as you crease it immediately after it has emerged from the laminating machine, while it is still warm and malleable!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-12 11.12.55In the vegie garden, Ross has removed all the old radish and lettuces. The Dutch Cream potatoes are in flower and the tomatoes are setting lots of fruit. Here is some of our fresh produce, which Ross harvested for one of his stir-fry dishes: our own onion, broccoli and silver beet! Not to mention Ross’s fresh home-made bread!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 18.12.51The mulberries have finally finished, so Ross also pruned underneath them and cut back branches, which were shading the rose hedge and inhibiting its growth. He also got rid of all the invasive poplar suckers.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.54.07We are very excited about the amount of fruit in the garden. We tasted our first raspberry the other day. As a good Tassie ex-pat, they really are my favourite fruit and it is so good to be able to grow them again and know that they are permanent. No more moves for us!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-23 17.46.47We also have 2 different types of plum in the garden and a bumper apple crop.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.50.01BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-25 18.49.00We also admire both our neighbours’ fruit trees : pears and apples galore!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 18.01.22BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 18.02.02The sulphur-crested cockatoos are already massing in the gum tree on our laneway, waiting patiently for the apples to ripen, while outdoing each other in their acrobatic wheeling and aerial manouevres. When we were in Geelong, I remember returning home one New Years Eve to discover the local cockatoo gang had stripped the apple trees bare during a drunken raid that same night!!! I wish they would stick to these attractive Duranta berries like the King Parrots and Crimson Rosellas.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-22 19.42.47BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-23 17.43.51The galahs also love feasting on the Duranta berries.BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-26 19.36.09BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-26 19.35.55

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Sulphur-crested Cockatoo in the Mulberry tree

The photogenic visitor below also enjoys our garden- hopefully for the beauty of the blooms, rather than the small birds! We think it is the same cat we saw on our neighbour’s roof, no doubt getting his own birds-eye view of potential feasting sites and a true example of a ‘Cat on a Hot Tin Roof’!!!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-21 16.10.39BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-21 16.10.30BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.59.07BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 17.59.45Please little blackbird, stay safe! Get Mum to come and feed you in the tree!!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-28 19.39.26BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-28 19.39.35BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-28 19.23.45A final farewell from our flamboyant Peony Poppies, which have entranced us for the last few weeks. Their blooms just about over and their foliage and stems brown and withered, we sadly pulled them out to freshen up the Soho Bed, saving as many of their drying seedheads as I could, despite Ross’s protestations that I only needed an ‘nth’ of what I collected!!! Here are a few final photos for the year! I marvel at the circuitous routes their seed head stems take and wonder why they make so many twists and turns! Life can be a bit like that sometimes!!!BlogSummers here 20%Reszd2015-11-24 19.38.16