The Versatile Blogger Award

My lovely daughter, Jenny Stephens, nominated me for this great award back in late January! Because we were away for most of the month, I have only just caught up with all my ‘to-do’ list, so given that Jen nominated me, I have decided to post my reply in the week of her birthday! Jen and I started our blogs at the very same time, only her posts are about travel. It’s a wonderful blog! She writes so well and her photos are superb! Reading her blog makes you feel like you are there! It has been a wonderful way to share her adventures, including all her thrills, which is at times, quite hair-raising for a parent !!! You can follow her travels at : https://exploreadventurediscover.wordpress.com.

versatileblogger-award

Here are the Rules for the Versatile Blogger Award

  • Thank the person who nominated you
  • Share the award on your blog
  • Share seven random facts about yourself
  • Tag 10 bloggers with less than 1,000 followers and let them know they’ve been nominated!

Mind you, having just consulted the following blog site: https://versatilebloggeraward.wordpress.com/vba-rules/, I discovered a few discrepancies! Sorry Jen ! I know you inherited your set of rules from your nominator! The site suggests tagging 15 bloggers (eek!), with no restriction on the number of followers, so I’m bending the rules for me ever so slightly! Even though awards are a terrific way of galvanizing one into searching out other blog sites, given how difficult and time-consuming it often is to determine the number of followers, I’m hedging my bets each way by nominating 10 bloggers (well, eleven strictly, but there’s a reason!) and disregarding the ‘less than 1000 followers rule’, though I will try to give preference to lesser-known blogs!

Seven Random Facts about Myself

  1. If you haven’t already guessed by my recent blog posts (!), I adore Old Roses. My favourite types are Noisettes and Albas, though really I love them all!!!
  2. I am also a keen birdwatcher and love our unique Australian birds.
  3. We travelled and camped all the way around Australia for 6 months in 2008. We climbed every mountain in the heat and lost so much weight! In the Cooktown Winter, I was having 6 cold showers every day!
  4. I relax before sleep with pixel puzzles and know it is time to go to sleep when I start making mistakes or come to a standstill!
  5. I like to plan ahead, both with my blogs, so I don’t panic (!),  and travel, so I don’t miss out on anything and make the most of our time! I could not live without my lists!
  6. I love books and reading and have been a keen library user for all my life. Often, I will borrow 10 books at a time.
  7. I also love film and if I had my time again, could easily pursue a career in film!

My Nominations

  1. http://www.shabbychick.me.uk: A delightful site by  Andrea Mynard, who lives in the Cotswolds with her family and writes about growing flowers, herbs and vegetables and then, cooking them! Her site resonates with us, as she shares our love of and belief in Simple Living, nature and creativity. I particularly loved her recent post on Hygge (http://www.shabbychick.me.uk/2017/01/28/hygge-wood-burner-cooking/), a new term for me, having only been recently introduced to it when my daughter bought a Christmas book from us on this Danish form of Simple Living.
  2. Andrea introduced me to Sarah, another keen gardener and cook, who has written two blogs : https://thegardendeli.wordpress.com/ and https://acrowdedtable.wordpress.com , the latter started in October 2015. Both have delicious recipes for cakes and pies, which is great for this fellow baker, but there are not a huge number of posts in the latest blog, so I’m not sure how active the site is! Maybe this nomination will inspire forthcoming recipes!
  3. I leap-frogged from Sarah to : https://aroundthemulberrytree.wordpress.com/, written by a Gippsland cheese-maker and sour-dough baker. Her photographs of her food, kitchen and garden in country Victoria, Australia, are beautiful and very inspiring!
  4. https://rabidlittlehippy.wordpress.com is another great blog about sustainability and ecoawareness by another country Victorian, with a terrific name, with which I totally identify!
  5. https://circusgardener.com/ has wonderful vegetarian recipes, which will greatly enlarge my limited repertoire and hopefully impress my vegetarian daughter, when she next visits! Its author, Steve Dent, also has some interesting thought-provoking posts on the politics of food.
  6. Emma Bradshaw, of Bradshaw and Sons, writes a delightful little blog,  http://emmabradshaw.blogspot.com.au/. It is all about simple family life and adventures, nature and wildlife, crafty ideas and recipes, photography and holidays, things that interest and inspire them and places they want to visit. If ever I visit London again, I will be sure to consult this lovely blog.
  7. https://jekkasherbfarm.wordpress.com/ is a wonderful informative blog for people like me, who love their herbs, and there are obviously a huge number of them! This nomination DEFINITELY breaks the ‘less than 1000 followers’ rule!! Jekka McVicar runs a herbetum and has an online shop, which sells seeds, books and herbal teas. See: https://www.jekkasherbfarm.com/. Her herbetum, which has the largest collection of culinary herbs in the United Kingdom, can be visited at Alveston, Bristol, South Gloucestershire and she also runs masterclasses in herb garden design, propagation, year round herbs and the use of herbs.
  8. Jekka introduced me to another herb-loving blogger, Lemon Verbena Lady, who also enjoys cross-stitch, another old hobby of mine, though I must admit that I don’t do so much, now that my eyes are not as good! She has some lovely lemon verbena recipes! Her blog address is: http://lemonverbenalady.blogspot.com.au/.
  9. The next nomination is: https://wildlifegardenerblog.wordpress.com . It is such a lovely blog about gardening, sustainability and environment by a kindred spirit! Beautiful photos and very inspiring!
  10. I have recently discovered the blog written by Emily Carter Mitchell at : https://bellaremyphotography.com. Her nature and wildlife photographs are absolutely superb and I have already learnt so much!
  11. And finally, because my second nomination may not be active still and Jekka’s blog has well over the restrictions on the number of followers (!), I have included an extra:  Lia Leendertz, who has written two delightful blogs: Midnight Brambling (now inactive, but can be accessed at : https://lialeendertz.wordpress.com/) and http://www.lialeendertz.com/blog/ . Both blogs have superb recipes, based on produce grown on her allotment, with enticing names like Gooseberry Knickerbocker Glory and Quince Icecream! I would love to be present at her Supper Club meals!!!

I know Jen would too! Happy Birthday Darling! Have a wonderful time in Greece and a year, full of happiness and many more exciting adventures, which I can’t wait to read about in your 2017 blog posts!!!

A Garden Weekend in the Southern Highlands: Part 3

And now, for our final two gardens, both relatively young and both collectors’ gardens: Perennial Hill and Chinoiserie!

Perennial Hill

1 Nero St. Mittagong  Ph 0409244200 or 0413004740   1 acre

September to March: September Open Daily 10am – 4pm; October to November Open weekends; December Open the first two weekends; then finally, an Autumn Festival in April.

$8 Adults; $7 Seniors; Under 16 years old: Free.

http://perennialhill.com.au/

Established on the sunny side of Mt. Gibraltar in 2001 by Craig and Julie Hulbert, Perennial Hill has been described as ‘a jewel in the making’ and also contains many rare botanical treasures.blogchinois20reszdimg_1478 Craig has had his own landscaping business for many years, while Julie has extensive horticultural experience, having worked in a number of nurseries.blogchinois20reszdimg_1496 Her passion is perennials, while Craig’s love is rockery plants and conifers and together, they have been able to indulge those interests in a series of rooms with different themes and styles.blogchinois20reszdimg_1504blogchinois20reszdimg_1510 Even though it is only 1 acre and still a relatively new garden, it feels much larger and older. It is amazing that when they first built their house, it was a completely bare paddock with a few eucalypts on the lower bottom corner and a small grouping at the top of the block.blogchinois20reszdimg_1473 The garden is situated on a steep exposed slope and has good volcanic soil and good drainage. From the road and entry, only the conifer area and rockery garden is visible, but there is so much more, hidden behind high Leyland Cypress hedges.blogchinois20reszdimg_1492blogchinois20reszdimg_1482blogchinois20reszdimg_1593blogchinois20reszdimg_1488 On one side of the house is a walled garden and rose avenue and on the other side, a potting shed and propagating area.blogchinois20reszdimg_1502blogchinois20reszdimg_1507blogchinois20reszdimg_1509 The area behind the house is more level and is cooler, wetter and shadier than the front, allowing a totally different set of plants to flourish.blogchinois20reszdimg_1547 blogchinois20reszdimg_1508blogchinois20reszdimg_1548There is a French parterre, topiared shapes and poplar hurdles and dry stone walls, blogchinois20reszdimg_1551blogchinois20reszdimg_1565blogchinois20reszdimg_1554blogchinois20reszdimg_1513 as well as a sunken garden with a dwarf Mondo grass floor, and double mixed perennial and shrub borders.blogchinois20reszdimg_1540blogchinois20reszdimg_1558blogchinois20reszdimg_1522blogchinois20reszdimg_1518blogchinois20reszdimg_1550 Perennials include: Pulmonarias; Campanulas; Salvias; Geums; Penstemons; Filipendulas; Monardas; Lysimachias; Francas; Helianthus and Rudbeckias.blogchinois20reszdimg_1476blogchinois20reszdimg_1575blogchinois20reszdimg_1474blogchinois20reszdimg_1592blogchinois20reszdimg_1481 Other plants include: Ranunculus; Leucadendrons; and Echiums with Digitalis.blogchinois20reszdimg_1573blogchinois20reszdimg_1581blogchinois20reszdimg_1536 I loved all the different combinations with a strong emphasis on colour and texture, as well as light and shade.blogchinois20reszdimg_1516blogchinois20reszdimg_1559 I also like all the garden accessories from birdcages to pots and statues.blogchinois20reszdimg_1512blogchinois20reszdimg_1572blogchinois20reszdimg_1529Craig and Julie have a large collection of Sambucus and Cornus, including the rare Cornus alternifolia argentea. They also have some very rare trees including: Dacrydium cupressinum (New Zealand Rimu) , Cunninghamiana lanceolata (China Fir); Cedrus atlantica glauca pendula (Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar); Abies lasiocarpa compacta (Dwarf Arizona Fir); Cedrela sinensis (Chinese Cedar); Pseudolarix amabilis (Japanese Larch) and Fagas sylvatica pendula (Weeping Beech).blogchinois20reszdimg_1569blogchinois20reszdimg_1582blogchinois20reszdimg_1586blogchinois20reszdimg_1577Julie runs a number of propagating workshops, as well as workshops with titles like:  Gardening in a Cool Climate; Creating a Summer Border; and An Introduction to Perennials, which covers the main family groups; use of perennials in the garden; soil preparation prior to planting; ongoing maintenance and pests and diseases. They have a market stall, as well as selling plants and gift ware in their garden shop in the house. They are also opened the garden for the inaugural Rare Plants Market Day on the last weekend of November. I look forward to seeing the development of this garden over the next few years. Julie and Craig are a lovely couple and very generous with their knowledge and time. They are constantly looking at new ideas to incorporate in their garden. Their new herbaceous perennial garden was inspired by Alan Bloom’s garden at Bressington, Norfolk, one of the 42 gardens they visited during a recent 5 week trip overseas.blogchinois20reszdimg_1499 If you would like to see more photos, Australian Country Magazine wrote an article on this beautiful garden in their November issue.

Chinoiserie

23 Webb St Mittagong   1.25 acres

Ph (02) 4872 3003; 0412 507547; 0411 783883

Late September to the end of November 10 am to 4.30 pm   $7 per adult

http://www.chinoiserie.com.au/

Not far away from Perennial Hill is another plant collector’s garden, established by Chris Styles and Dominic Wong in 1999 and specializing in peonies! They grow over 100 varieties of peonies from Chinese and Japanese Tree Peonies, which flower from mid-September to mid-October; European and American Tree Peonies, which bloom from mid-October to early November and Herbaceous Peonies, which finish the peony season from early to late November. The peony nursery is close to the house, the umbrellas shading the blooms from the intense sun. This pink peony is Hanabi from Japan.blogchinois20reszdimg_0319blogchinois20reszdimg_1453We visited this lovely garden last Autumn, but while we were in the area this weekend, we popped in for a quick sniff of the peonies, which were in full Spring bloom. Not all peonies are scented, so I was keen to smell them before making any decisions on peony selection, as tree peonies are quite expensive. They certainly have an unusual scent and I was really pleased that I made the effort to check and could now open the whole ballpark as far as peony choice was concerned. I loved the white ones and coral ones, but the deep reds were also very attractive! The first photo below is the Japanese Mekoho, while the second photo is Pink Hawaiian Coral.blogchinois20reszdimg_1456blogchinois20reszdimg_1459Peonies are the National flower of China and part of Dominic’s heritage, as his mother was Chinese. Apparently, during the early Chinese Dynasties, only the Emperor could grow peonies, so during the Cultural Revolution, Mao Tse Tung ordered the destruction of all peonies, because of their association with the royal family. Fortunately, they were also grown in monastery gardens and monks were able to preserve them, because their roots were used as medicine to purify the blood and treat female problems. The first photo below is Kronos from America. I’m not sure of the identity of the second peony.blogchinois20reszdimg_1463blogchinois20reszdimg_1461Dominic honed his horticultural skills on a 500 square metre block (plus the adjoining nature strip!) in Sydney, growing drought-tolerant plants around his Californian bungalow, but was keen for a larger garden and in 1999, bought a vacant block with Chris on sloping land with a creek at the bottom. They built a classic storybook cottage, which they run as a Bed-and-Breakfast with two guestrooms and a choice of an English or Chinese Yum-Cha breakfast. They designed the garden to be seen from the dining room windows, as the Winters are so cold. Here is their map of the overall design:blogsth-highlds30reszdimage-194I loved the long formal herbaceous perennial borders, which provide a constant colour from Spring to late Autumn and display great variation in colour, texture and leaf shape.blogchinois20reszdimg_0354blogchinois20reszdimg_0357blogchinois20reszdimg_0329 Perennials include: Penstemons, Salvias, Centauras, Euphorbias, Alstroemerias, Phlomis, Oriental Iris, Verbascums, Cannas, Verbenas, Stachys, Scented Geraniums, Abutilon and Tree Lupins.blogchinois20reszdimg_0351blogchinois20reszdimg_0356blogchinois20reszdimg_0327blogchinois20reszdimg_0334 There are also larger perennials like Melianthus, Romneya, Tree Dahlias, Stipa gigantea and Foxtail Lilies.blogchinois20reszdimg_0347blogchinois20reszdimg_0332 There is also a potager, hedged with Hidcote lavenders, and full of vegetables and herbs; a chook boudoir; formal lawns, a parterre garden, a Chinese garden; a circular rose garden;blogchinois20reszdimg_0362blogchinois20reszdimg_0358blogchinois20reszdimg_0363blogchinois20reszdimg_0359 an angel garden; an alpine garden with Lewisias, Pasque flowers and small alpine plants; a pond and stream garden, which is actually two ponds with a stream in between, growing Astilbes and Hostas, with a Chinese Peony pavilion beside the pond;blogchinois20reszdimg_0340blogchinois20reszdimg_0337blogchinois20reszdimg_0339 and a developing woodland with trees like Tulip Tree, a Weeping Willow, a Trident Maple, Gingko, Pear, Birch, Beech, Sopora, Cherry, Judas Tree and Chinese Elm, all under-planted with rhododendrons, azaleas and bluebells.blogchinois20reszdimg_0323 I love the little extra garden furnishings:blogchinois20reszdimg_0335blogchinois20reszdimg_0326There are also a number of lovely roses: Mme Grégoire Staechlin over the arbour; Crépuscule with an orange Abutilon neighbour; Lorraine Lea and Duchesse de Brabant on an arch over the path; as well as Abraham Darby , Complicata; Sparrieshoop and Rugspin. Dominic and Chris sell a number of perennials, as well as their main focus: herbaceous and tree peonies.blogchinois20reszdimg_0342blogchinois20reszdimg_0322

Other Places to Visit in the Southern Highlands:

Lydie du Bray Antiques

117 Old Hume Highway Braemar, near Mittagong.  Ph: (02) 4872 2844

http://lydiedubrayantiques.com.au/

A wonderful selection of imported French antiques and decorative items, housed in the house, outbuildings and garden of Kamilaroi, a turn-of-the-century homestead.blogchinois20reszdimg_1287 We particularly loved all the garden furniture and accoutrements including: garden gates, arbours and gazebos; tables, chairs and benches; statues and fountains; bird baths and bird cages; jardinières, urns and a variety of pots of different types and sizes.blogglenmore20reszdimg_1292Dirty Jane’s

13 – 15 Banquette St Bowral   Phone : (02) 4861 3231

http://dirtyjanes.com/

A wonderful vintage mecca with over 75 individual dealers in three warehouse spaces. We finally found our four beautiful full-length lounge room curtains in the far corner of one of the sheds and after slight modification from a triple to a double pleat, they fit the windows perfectly and already being fully lined, saved us a mountain of work and expense! The fabric alone (at least 5 metres per curtain), a vintage Sanderson fabric called Salad Days, would cost a mint and is a perfect backdrop for our old cream and silver American Embassy lounge suites, which we found in our local antique shop. The curtains, which ironically were imported from America three weeks beforehand, look so sumptuous in the room and it feels like they have been there forever, even though we still pinch ourselves that we have been so lucky!blogchinois20reszd2016-12-05-18-40-06Country Accents

http://www.countryaccentfloralboutique.com/pages/about-us

Home of incredibly life-like artificial flowers, as well as products by Crabtree and Evelyn and Occitaine; candles and soaps; earthenware jugs and glassware.blogchinois20reszdimg_1604blogchinois20reszdimg_1606Victoria House Needlecraft

Corner Old Hume Highway and Helena St Mittagong Ph  (02) 4871 1682

Open 7 days a week 9am to 5pm and online

http://www.victoriahouseneedlecraft.com.au/

A veritable treasure trove for anyone interested in textile crafts with separate rooms devoted to cross-stitch and tapestry; embroidery threads (photo below); knitting wool and needles; beads; and books and patterns.

Loom Fabrics

370 Bong Bong St Bowral Ph 0439 025853

Tuesday to Friday 10 am to 5 pm; Saturday 10 am to 4 pm

http://www.loomfabrics.com.au/

Beautiful selection of fabrics for dressmaking. I am looking forward to sewing a dress from this beautiful blue and white fabric! The book titled ‘Art and the Gardener‘ is for Christmas, while the book about Glenmore was a birthday present for Ross.blogchinois20reszdimg_1681

Mt Murray Nursery

Lot 1 Old Dairy Close (off Berrima Road) Moss Vale  NSW  2577    Ph ( 02) 48694111

Open 7 days a week 9 am to 5 pm.

http://www.mtmurraynursery.com/

Stocks a wonderful range of cool climate plants including maples, conifers  and native trees; shrubs like rhododendrons, azaleas and camellias; roses and clematis; hedging plants; fruiting plants; vegetables and herbs; annuals and perennials and pots and ornaments. These are the garden spoils, collected on our trip from the various gardens and nurseries.blogchinois20reszdimg_1682Manning Lookout

We drove home via Fitzroy Falls and Kangaroo Valley. It is well worth taking a short detour up a rough gravel road (Manning Lookout Rd) to a spectacular cliff line and views over Kangaroo Valley.blogchinois20reszdimg_1634blogchinois20reszdimg_1631blogchinois20reszdimg_1629We had a wonderful weekend away in the Southern Highlands and could easily repeat the experience every Spring, revisiting these and other gardens including Retford Park, Milton Park and Camden House! For more on the wonderful open gardens in this area in Spring, as well as opening dates, please see:

http://www.southern-highlands.com.au/

http://www.southern-highlands.com.au/events/whats-on/2016-spring-open-gardens

and

http://www.southern-highlands.com.au/uploads/624/open-garden-booklet-2016-spring.pdf.

For more information about the history of these gardens, it is also worth reading:

Gardens of the Southern Highlands New South Wales 1828 – 1988: A Fine Extensive Pleasure Ground by Jane Cavanough, Anthea Prell and Tim North.

This is the last of my general garden posts for the year. Next year, I will be focusing more on rose gardens. It is also the second last post for 2016! I will be posting the December Garden on Boxing Day. I hope you all have a wonderful relaxing Christmas and a well-earned break for the year! Much Love and Best Wishes to you all,  Jane and Ross xxx

Tiny Treasures: Feature Plants for July

This month, I am featuring my tiny treasures : violets; forget-me-nots; snow drops and snowflakes; hellebores; and the tiny flowers of Winter daphne and Winter honeysuckle, all cherished for their fragile beauty and scent in a cold Winter world, when the rest of the garden has gone to sleep.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-08-27 09.55.42BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-08-27 09.56.13Violets (Viola odorata) are a mainstay in our garden from late Autumn to early Spring, lining the main staircase up to the house and the back path (photo 3), blanketing the ground under the deciduous trees along the fence and our front door camellia and filling their own bed, where their bright blue flowers contrast dramatically with the fallen red maple leaves.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-05-23 10.34.58BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-02 14.16.04BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-07 12.45.46 We have 3 different colours : blue, a deeper purple and pink. In our old Armidale garden, we only had white violets and I used to dream of our current violet banks.Blog Mid Winter20%ReszdIMG_8906Blog LateWinter20%Reszd2015-09-03 15.04.42

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Deep purple violet along the back path         Photo by Caroline Stephens

Viola odorata, or Sweet Violet, belongs to the family Violaceae and genus Viola, which contains an unbelievably large number of species : 400-500 species, though some sources suggest it could be as high as 600 species. Some of the more common ones are :

  • Viola arvensis – Field Pansy
  • Viola biflora – Yellow Wood Violet or Twoflower Violet
  • Viola canina – Heath Dog Violet
  • Viola hirta – Hairy Violet
  • Viola odorata – Sweet Violet
  • Viola pedunculata – Yellow Pansy
  • Viola riviniana – Common Dog Violet – similar in looks to V.odorata, but scentless
  • Viola tricolor – Wild Pansy or Heart’s-Ease – purple, yellow and white
  • Viola adunca – Early Blue Violet
  • Viola nephrophylla – Northern Bog Violet
  • Viola pedatifida – Crowfoot Violet
  • Viola pubescens – Downy Yellow Violet
  • Viola rugulosa – Western Canada Violet
  • Viola lutea – Mountain Pansy – yellow flowers

There are also 3 Australian native species :

  • Viola hederaceae- common Native Violet – bright green, kidney-shaped leaves and purple and white flowers. Useful ground cover in moist shady areas.
  • Viola betonicifolia
  • Viola banksii

BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.18.56Viola odorata is a small perennial plant with heart-shaped leaves and highly fragrant, assymmetrical flowers (purple, blue, yellow, white, cream or blue and yellow), which bloom in Winter and early Spring. It is native to temperate areas in the Northern Hemisphere and loves moist shady conditions, though it does equally well in full sun. It thrives on moist, well-drained soil, rich in organic matter and only requires moderate watering.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-05-31 12.32.31 It is a tough little plant and transplants easily with minimal after-care. In truth, they are almost a weed at our place, as they throw out underground rhizomes with abandon, quickly invading large areas with their long runners.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.30.20BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-09-03 15.03.56 They can be propagated by seed and  root cuttings, division best done in Autumn or just after flowering, though really they can be planted at any time from Spring (after frost)  through to Autumn with a spade of compost and mulch to keep the roots cool. Occasionally, they get red spider mite in dry weather, but otherwise they have few pests.Blog LateWinter20%Reszd2015-09-03 15.03.53 They are the food plant for some Lepidoptera larvae, including Giant Leopard Moth, Large Yellow Underwing, Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, High Brown Fritillary, Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary, Pearl-bordered Fritillary and Setaceous Hebrew Character. Sweet violets are grown as a ground cover in woodland gardens, in garden beds and along water edges, as accent plants around trees and even as container plants.

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Blue violets in maple bed             Photograph by Caroline Stephens

Violets were cultivated in Greece before 500 BC and were used by both the Ancient Greeks and Romans in herbal remedies, love potions, wine (Vinum violatum), festivals and even to sweeten food. While our society sees the violet as a symbol of modesty, sweetness and faithfulness, to the Ancient Greeks, it was a symbol of love and fertility. For more about the mythology surrounding the violet, see: http://comenius-legends.blogspot.com.au/2010/07/legend-of-violet.htmlBlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.30.34Ancient Roman physician, Pliny the Elder, advocated the wearing of a garland of violets on the head to ward off headaches and dizzy spells. Perhaps the intoxicating scent of the violet blooms banished the headache! Certainly, both the leaves and flowers are edible and rich in vitamins and can be used in medicines and as a laxative, though they should not be taken internally in large doses! Clinical trials have shown that a syrup of V.odorata can improve cough suppression in asthmatic children. Intranasal administration of V.odorata extract has also been shown to be effective in treating insomnia. What a blissful sleep! For more information on the use of violets as a herbal remedy, see : http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/v/vioswe12.html .BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-05-03 10.37.59Fresh flowers add a lovely flash of colour in salads, fruit punches and ice bowls. The flowers can also be candied, using egg white and crystallized sugar, to decorate cakes and are still produced commercially in France, where they are known as ‘Violettes de Toulouse’. I tried making crystallized violets and rose petals for my son’s birthday cake (1st 3 photos), and while I wouldn’t say it was a roaring success (especially because I confused salt for the castor sugar initially!), it still did provide some colour! Making candied violets is obviously an art form! The French also make a Violet Syrup from Extract of Violets. The syrup can be used to make violet scones and marshmallows. I decorated the banana cake in the photo below with fresh pink and blue violets.BlogTinyTreasures20%ReszdIMG_8953BlogBirthdayCurry20%Reszd2016-04-21 16.50.25BlogBirthdayCurry20%Reszd2016-04-21 17.16.36BlogBirthdayCurry20%Reszd2016-04-24 14.02.52 But the most obvious use of the flowers is as a source of scent in the perfume industry, as well as in nosegays and Spring bouquets. There is even a Violet Day in Australia and New Zealand, on 2 July , when fresh violets and badges depicting violets were sold for fund-raising efforts  to commemorate the lost soldiers of the First World War. Before the Flanders poppy, the violet was considered to be a ‘symbol of perpetual remembrance.’ See : http://www.familyhistorysa.info/sahistory/ww1violetday.html  and  http://adelaidia.sa.gov.au/events/violet-day.

BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-06 17.33.14
Mixed jonquils, Westringia, stock and violets
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Violets and English primroses
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Bouquet of erlicheer jonquils, violets and forget-me-nots

An ideal lead-in for my next tiny treasure, the humble Forget-me-not, Myosotis!BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-09-04 15.21.22 In Newfoundland, the forget-me-not is a symbol of remembrance of the nation’s war-dead. It was used as a symbol in the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, in remembrance of the 1.5 Million killed by the Ottoman Turks between 1915-1923 . In medieval times, the forget-me-not was a symbol of faithfulness and enduring love. Its name is purported to have originated from the German legend of a lover who, while gathering the flowers, fell into a river and cried ‘forget-me-not’ as he drowned.

The scientific name Myosotis comes from the Greek word:  μυοσωτίς or  “mouse’s ear” after the leaf. It belongs to the family Boraginaceae and the genus contains 74 species, 60 from Western Eurasia and 14 from New Zealand. The most common species are the biennial Woodland Forget-me-not, M. sylvatica, and the perennial Water Forget-me-not, M. scorpioides. They are now common throughout temperate latitudes, especially in moist areas.Blog LateWinter20%Reszd2015-09-04 15.21.16Forget-me-nots are small tufted plants with simple, blunt, lance-shaped, greyish, finely -haired leaves and tiny 5-petalled blue, mauve, pink, white or cream flowers, usually borne in sprays on short branching stems in Spring and early Summer, though my plants are currently flowering! They grow well in both sun and shade, but prefer cool weather and moist soil. They are propagated by seed or careful division in Winter.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-06 17.55.24 One sure fact is that once you have them, you will always have them! Some people may even go so far as to describe them as invasive, but I could never begrudge forget-me-nots nor violets for their profligacy, as I love them and despite their prevalence, they are not always that easy to locate when you are searching for them for a new garden! We found our plants growing wild on the banks of the extinct volcano, Mt Noorat (photos below).BlogTinyTreasures50%ReszdOC 024BlogTinyTreasures50%ReszdOC 025 I love watching them multiply and appear in odd spots throughout the garden. Traditionally, they are used as a ground cover in woodland gardens, in rockeries and beside ponds.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.58.09 I love using their fragile feathery blooms to soften floral arrangements. Like violets, they are also a food plant for various Lepidoptera species, including the Setaceous Hebrew Character.

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‘Acropolis’ Double Daffodil, Sea Thrift, Italian Lavender, Wallflowers, Catmint, Society Garlic and Forget-me-not

Other woodland ground covers include the delicate white snowdrops and snowflakes, often confused with each other because of their green-tipped white drooping bells. They are however quite different plants. Snowdrops (1st photo) only have one flower per stem and each flower has 3 large exterior petals and 3 smaller central petals, tipped with green.

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Photo of Leucojum from www.pixabay.com

Snowflakes are a larger plant with each stem bearing several flowers, each of which has 6 petals all the same size and each tipped with green. We grew up with snowflakes, which are members of the Leucojum genus, but the true snowdrop belongs to the Galanthus genus.

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Clumps of Snowflakes (Leucojum)         Photo from www. pixabay.com

Leucojum is a member of the Amaryllidaceae family and hails from Central and Southern Europe. The scientific name comes from the Greek words: ‘leucojum’ meaning ‘white violet.’ There are only 2 species: the Spring Snowflake L.vernum (‘vernum’ is the Greek for Spring) and L. aestivum (‘aestivum’ meaning Summer, though really it flowers in late Spring after L. vernum). It looks great in clumps under deciduous trees and shrubs and can be propagated by division immediately after flowering or when the leaves have died down. Our Leucojum are pushing their way through a border of Mondo grass on the path edge.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-07-31 07.23.01 Snowdrops however are seen far less commonly in Australia, as they only like cold to moderately cold Winters. Their scientific name comes from the Greek words : ‘gala’ meaning ‘milk’ and ‘anthos’ meaning ‘flower’. These hardy, bulbous, perennial herbaceous plants have grey-green leaves and flower in Winter before the vernal equinox, pushing their stalks through the snow. Like snowflakes, they are also from the family Amaryllidaceae and are found in the deciduous woodlands of Southern and Central Europe from the Pyrenees to Ukraine. They were introduced to Britain in the early 16th century and readily naturalized, so much so that they are often called the English Snowdrop. In England, they are also known as ‘the flower of hope’, while in France, they have a much more prosaic name ‘Perce-neige’ (‘perforating snow’). In the Language of Flowers, they are a symbol of purity and hope.BlogTinyTreasures25%Reszd2015-07-01 11.10.11 There are 20 species in the genus, the most widespread and well-known being the Common Snowdrop, Galanthus nivalis (‘nivalis’ is Greek for ‘of the snow’). There are a huge number of single and double-flowered cultivars (over 500 in 2002, but now a further 1500 new cultivars), all differing in size, shape and markings, and developed from G.nivalis, as well as the Crimean Snowdrop, G. plicatus, and the Giant Snowdrop, G. elwesii. In fact, snowdrop collectors are known as ‘galanthophiles’ and  it is quite a competitive and exclusive hobby. See : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16789834. There are a large number of snowdrop gardens in the United Kingdom, which are open to the public during the season. See: http://www.saga.co.uk/magazine/home-garden/gardening/ideas/days-out/snow drop-gardens-to-visit-in-the-uk. Scotland celebrated its first Snowdrop Festival from the 1st February to 11th March, 2007. I bought my snowdrop bulbs from a specialist plant nursery. They were quite expensive, but fortunately, they multiply easily from offset bulbs and we were able to divide the clumps and plant them as a curved border to the fence shrubbery in front of the lilac and flowering quinces and around the bird bath. It is the perfect spot for them, as they like moist well-drained soil and shady areas. I look forward to seeing them naturalize and multiply in the grass. They have such exquisite flowers!BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-13 16.57.41 I certainly won’t be eating them though! Galanthus are poisonous to humans, causing nausea, diarrhoea and vomiting if consumed in large quantities. Its active ingredient is galatamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, which is used in the management of Alzheiners and traumatic injuries to the nervous system. It is also an effective insecticide in the management of beetles, Lepidoptera and Hemiptera. In fact, these plants are pest-free, avoided by rabbits, deer, chipmunks and mice! Current research is focused on its use in genetic engineering for pest resistance and the treatment of HIV. See : https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255618182_Analysis_of_Pusztai_Study_on_GM_Potatoes_and_their_effect_on_Rats

Hellebores are another specialist collector plant, which can become quite addictive! I inherited the common single white and purple varieties in our new garden in Candelo, but my Mum also gave me 5 double forms (deep purple, deep red, pink, white, white blotched with pink) 2 years ago as a birthday present. My sister bought them for her from The Melbourne International Flower and Plant Show, where a hellebore specialist nursery, Post Office Farm (https://www.postofficefarmnursery.com.au/)  had a stall and the following Winter, I visited their farm on one of their open days, where I bought a species hellebore, Helleborus x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’ . See my post on Post Office Farm at: https://candeloblooms.com/2016/04/12/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-specialist-nurseries-and-gardens-in-victoria/

BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-07-31 07.34.53BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-09 18.07.58BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-17 14.22.12I have planted them under separate deciduous trees, as they are highly promiscuous, interbreeding with abandon, and I really want their offspring to retain their original forms true to type. For example, the white double hellebore complements the white statue Phoebe and white anemones under the maple tree on the terrace (1st and 2nd photo above); my deep red hellebore is under the Protea (3rd photo above) and my species hellebore, Helleborus x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’, occupies a special place under the camellia beside the front door (below).

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Hellebores are also known as Winter Rose, Snow Rose, Lenten Rose and Christmas Rose, due the fact that they flower round this time in their native environment, the deciduous woodlands of Southern and Western Europe and Western Asia. Their scientific name, Helleborus,  comes from the Greek words : ἑλλέβορος helléboros, from elein “to injure” and βορά borá “food”, referring to their toxicity. They are low growing, clump forming, evergreen, Winter-flowering perennials from the family Ranunculaceae, the same family which includes delphiniums, anemones, aquilegias, buttercups and clematis. Hellebores have attractive, leathery, evergreen, toothed, palmate leaves and open, cup-shaped flowers in Winter. Most varieties are single with 5 petals.BlogTinyTreasures25%Reszd2015-09-15 17.29.53 There are 17 different species, divided into 2 different categories.

The Caulescent types have leaves on the flowering stems and include :

Stinking hellebore, H. foetidus: Pungent smell when foliage is crushed; tall plant; large number of small lime-green bell-shaped flowers; See 2nd photo below.

Corsican Hellebore, H. argutifolius: heavily toothed leathery evergreen leaves; up to 1 m tall, so best at the back of the border; heads of lime-green flowers. One of the toughest hellebores and tolerates more sun than other species; See 1st photo below.

Majorcan Hellebore, H. lividus: Silvery leaves and smoky-pink flowers.

and the rare H. versicarius: From SW Turkey;  red-tipped lime bells; thrives in the sun.

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Corsican Hellebore    Photo from www.pixabay.com
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Stinking Hellebore     Photo from www.pixabay.com

In acaulescent varieties , the leaves are basal and stemless and include :

Oriental Rose, H. orientalis, the most common species in Australia. Pink, maroon and cream single flowers, ageing to green.

Green Hellebore, H. viridus: Green flowers.

Black Hellebore, H. niger: The roots are black and the flowers white, flushed with pink or purple as they mature.

Ferny Hellebore, H. multifidus: Green flowers and finely-divided leaves.

H. cyclophyllus : Yellow-green flowers and slight perfume.

H. odorus: Light green flowers.

and

Helleborus atrorubens : Dark green and purple flowers (photo below).BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2014-07-06 11.04.50

There are also a large number of hybrid cultivars, including:

  1. sternii : H. argutifolius x H. lividus
  2. nigercors: H. argutifolius x H. niger
  3. x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’: H. lividus x H. niger   (1st photo below)    and
  4. orientalis x H. purpurascens : Red-purple hybrid.

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Oriental Hellebore

Other crosses using oriental hellebores have created a wide colour range from slate grey and metallic black to red, purple, dusky pink, lime green, yellow and cream and white, often with speckles and flashes. There are also double and semi-double forms. To fully appreciate the huge variety in hellebores, consult the following websites: https://www.postofficefarmnursery.com.au/galleries and http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/10648349/A-hellebore-for-almost-any-situation.html.Blog LateAutumn20%Reszd2015-08-12 15.49.09BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2014-07-06 10.56.54Hellebores grow throughout cold and temperate areas in Australia from Tasmania, Victoria and the coastal stretch up to Sydney; inland as far north as the Queensland border and in temperate areas in South Australia. They like Winter sun and Summer shade and can handle dry periods, so are ideal under deciduous trees. Dappled shade is best, as full shade results in less leaf growth.  They also like a humus-rich, slightly acidic soil and hate waterlogged soil or sand. BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2015-09-05 08.35.32They are used in mass plantings and as ground cover, especially in dry shade and under established trees. They combine well with galanthus (very similar growing conditions), hostas, anemones, aquilegias, epimediums, solomon’s seal, ferns, vinca, scilla, cyclamen, leucojum and crocus. They look lovely at the feet of camellias, magnolias, dogwoods,  flowering quinces, daphne and hydrangeas (photo below). They can even be grown in pots.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.25.49 Hellebores propagate from seed, which spreads readily. Seedlings should be transplanted when very young (only a few centimetres high), as they do not like having their roots disturbed. They can also be lifted and divided in Autumn and early Spring.BlogTinyTreasures20%ReszdIMG_0243 They should be planted with organic compost, then mulched in Summer to keep their roots cool. Old leaves and flowers should be removed in Autumn, as the new leaves appear, to allow them to flourish and display the flowers to their best advantage. The only exception is the caulescent hellebores, in which the old flower stems should be removed in mid to late Spring after flowering. The plants benefit from a well-balanced fertilizer in Autumn, as well as a handful of dolomite lime. Generally though, hellebores are tough and individual plants have been known to reach 40 years of age.BlogTinyTreasures20%ReszdIMG_8905 BlogTinyTreasures20%ReszdIMG_8955The flowers last a long time on the plant, but only up to 7 days in the vase. Their heads tend to droop and should be propped up with other flowers or the vase placed on a high shelf, where their flowers can be appreciated. Floral treatments in the past vary from splitting stems to scalding them by plunging the stem ends into boiling water (often still done by commercial growers), but most experts agree that a good long soak prior to arranging is essential, even to the extent of totally submerging the flower heads in water for up to 3 hours. Recut the stems 2-3 cm from their ends, especially if they have been seared by the grower and use preservative in the water. Misting the flowers is also beneficial. Their flowers also look good floating in a shallow bowl of water. Flowers can be wired for support, but should not be used for corporate designs, as their flowers will droop and dry out in air conditioning or heating. They also hate foam, so only use a vase. The flower centres are also suitable for drying.

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Bowl of ‘bores: a beautiful photo of hellebores floating in a bowl by Jacki-Dee   Courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons,  licensed by CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

http://flic.kr/p/9koemY

Do be aware though when collecting seed and handling hellebores that they are extremely toxic. They contain protoanemonin and are strongly emetic and laxative. In fact, they were used in the past to induce vomiting. They can cause diarrhoea, cardiac problems and skin irritation. They are also very poisonous for livestock.  But don’t let it put you off these otherwise delightful plants!

It is well worth visiting Post Office Farm on one of their Open Days (every Sunday between 5th June and 25th September 2016). See: https://www.postofficefarmnursery.com.au/events-fairs/ or if you cannot make it, one of their plant stalls at the numerous plant fairs around the country. See: https://www.postofficefarmnursery.com.au/plant-fairs/.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2014-07-06 10.56.34

And now for some slightly larger plants, whose tiny scented Winter flowers still allow for their inclusion in a post on tiny treasures:

Winter Daphne    Daphne odora

Native to China and Japan, Winter Daphne belongs to the Thymelaeceae family and the Daphne genus, which includes 50 species of deciduous and evergreen shrubs throughout Asia, Europe and North Africa.

Winter Daphne is an evergreen, densely-branched, ornamental shrub, up to 1m tall, with simple, alternate, glossy-green leathery leaves. There is a variety ‘aureomarginata’, whose leaves are edged in a creamy-yellow colour. It has highly fragrant pale-pink fleshy tubular flowers, each with 4 lobes, from mid Winter to late Spring. There is a variety, ‘Alba’ with pure white flowers. The flowers are hermaphroditic and are pollinated by bees, flies and Lepidoptera.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-24 12.27.39Daphne has a reputation for being difficult, but if they are planted in the right spot, they can be quite long-lived , tough, low maintenance and drought-tolerant shrubs. My research into their ideal planting site revealed  their preferences:

  • Morning sun or easterly-facing aspect with shade from the hot afternoon sun.
  • Fertile, slightly acidic peaty soil.
  • Perfect drainage- a raised bed or drier spot under the eaves is ideal, as they are prone to root rot.

They should not be over-watered or over-fed and pruning should be minimal. After flowering, a slow-release fertilizer with iron chelates can be applied. Mulch will keep the root run cool, but should be kept away from the stem. Daphne hates any root disturbance or cultivation around its roots and transplants badly. It can be propagated by softwood cuttings in early to mid Summer and semi-ripe or evergreen cuttings in mid to late Summer. They are susceptible to a virus infection, which causes mottling of the leaves, and attack by scale insects, which can be squashed or smothered in white oil.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-06-19 14.16.45All parts are poisonous to humans and livestock. The sap can cause dermatitis, so be careful when cutting. Despite their toxicity and their finicky nature, I would not be without a Winter Daphne. Their scent is divine, both indoors and outside, so make sure it is in a prominent position. Our plant is right beside the back steps as we leave the house, very close in fact to the Winter Honeysuckle, my last feature plant for this post, so the air smells quite heavenly in Winter!Blog Mid Winter20%Reszd2015-07-31 07.22.57Winter Honeysuckle    Lonicera fragrantissimaBlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-11 15.10.23Also known as ‘Chinese Honeysuckle’, ‘Sweet breath of Spring’ and the quaint name ‘Kiss-me-at-the-gate’, Winter Honeysuckle belongs to the Caprifoliaceae family and the Lonicera genus, which contains 200 species of Honeysuckle shrubs and climbers, including the well-known white-and-yellow Japanese Honeysuckle, L. japonica and  pink-and-gold Woodbine, L. periclymen (photo below).BlogSpringfeastg20%Reszd2015-10-28 16.55.23Winter Honeysuckle is native to China and was introduced to England by Robert Fortune in 1845, making its way to America by 1852. It is a semi-evergreen shrub 1-3 m tall and wide, though it can reach 4.6m tall and it takes 5-10 years to reach full height. Its slender spreading branches form a bushy tangle over time. It is deciduous in areas with harsh Winters.Blog Ambassadors Spr20%Reszd2015-09-05 08.29.43 White to creamy white, two-lipped flowers with protruding yellow anthers are borne in pairs in Winter and early Spring. They are highly fragrant. Branches cut for the house will perfume a room for days, so long as the vase is kept away from heat. The flowers are also a great nectar and pollen provider for insects and birds in Winter.BlogJune Garden 20%Reszd2016-06-11 15.10.29 Winter Honeysuckle loves full sun, though will tolerate partial shade. Propagation is by hardwood or semi-hardwood cuttings in late Summer. There are very few pests and diseases.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-07 13.32.53BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-06-28 13.14.52These old-fashioned ornamental plants can be grown as a specimen plant, a clipped or informal hedge or screen or at the back of a shrub border. My Winter Honeysuckle is in an ideal location right outside the back door and on the bend of the back path, as it becomes the entrance path.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-07 13.33.34 I adore that waft of fresh lemony scent every time I go out the back door at this time of year. It is so uplifting! It also flowers for a long time- at least 3 months! I feel so lucky to have inherited such a beautiful old shrub- in fact, it was one of the reasons we bought the place, as it was in full bloom we first discovered the house in  August 2014.BlogTinyTreasures20%Reszd2016-07-10 11.39.55I also like to use their flowers to decorate cakes. Here is a photo of a rustic apple cake, topped with the sweet blooms of erlicheer jonquils, Paperwhite jonquils and Winter honeysuckle.Blog Whentheking20%Reszd2015-09-04 09.57.50To finish my post, here is another delightful watercolour painting by my daughter Caroline, illustrating some of my tiny treasures. It reminds me of a wonderful description I once read in ‘Tulipomania’ by Mike Dash about the festivals of the Ottoman Empire during the Tulip Era (1718 -1730), the latter half coinciding with the reign of Sultan Ahmed III (ruled 1703 -1730), during which tortoises, with candles fixed to their backs, moved slowly through tulip beds under the April full moon on the first night of the Tulip Festival. I just love it! Thanks Caro! x

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Tiny Treasures by Caroline Stephens (Artwork and photograph)

The Jewel in the Crown : Tathra and Kianinny Bay

Tathra is a small coastal township (population 1622) on the Sapphire Coast and is one of our favourite spots! It has the closest beach to Bega and is situated between Merimbula, 25 km to the south and Bermagui, 44 km to the north. It is 446 km south of Sydney via the Princes Highway and sits high on a bluff, overlooking its famous wharf. The 3rd and 4th photos show the view north to Wajurda Point and Moon Bay.

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Tathra Headland
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Historic Tathra Wharf
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Kingdom of the Sea Eagle
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View to the north from Tathra: All part of Mimosa Rocks National Park

The area has a rich aboriginal history, which I will cover in next week’s post (A Slice of History), due to its abundant land and sea food resources. The name ‘Tathra’ means ‘beautiful country’ in the local Yuin dialect, though other sources suggest it has a  slightly different meaning : ‘place of wild cats’!!!

The first Europeans in the area settled to the west of Tathra, illegally squatting on Crown Land in the 1820s and 1830s. At that stage, the area was outside the limits of legal settlement, known as ‘the 19 Counties’. See : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteen_Counties for more information. This rich dairying country is regularly flooded and teams with birdlife, especially water birds. Apparently, in the 1971 Bega Valley flood, water covered the 45 foot telegraph poles all the way along the mile long flat!

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Dairy flats at Jellat Jellat
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Extensive waterways and home of Bird Route No. 1
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Recent flooding this year

An enquiry into transport facilities in the Bega area in 1851 led to the formation of the Illawarra  Steam Navigation Company in 1858. It was an amalgamation of smaller steamer services along the South coast : the Kiama Steam Navigation Company and vessels of the Twofold Bay Pastoral Association and Edye Manning’s fleet. The name was changed in 1904 to the Illawarra and South Coast Steam Navigation Company. The first cargo vessel, a 50 ton sailboat called ‘Vision’, arrived in Tathra that same year and moored offshore, its cargo being transported on a small boat to Kangarutha, where a store shed was erected at a small anchorage, ‘Stockyards’, later that year.

Tathra started out as a small jetty, known as the ‘Farmers’ Sea Wharf’. It was a shipping outlet for a group of local farmers, led by Daniel Gowing, who were fed up with having to transport their produce to Merimbula 25 km away, especially as the wagons often had to wait for the tide to go out when they crossed the beach at Bournda. Daniel Gowing was a farmer from Jellat Jellat, who opened the first store in Tathra for produce to be shipped soon after from Kangarutha.

In 1860, it was decided that Kianinny Bay was more sheltered for loading than Kangarutha, so a store was built at Kianinny. Cargo was still shipped from the beach by small boats to vessels, like ‘Gipsy’, ‘Ellen’, ‘You Yangs’ and ‘John Penn’, moored in the bay. Bad weather often held up the produce wagons on their way to the boats, so loading was uncertain and the freight costs high.

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Kianinny Bay today

Tathra township was surveyed in 1861 and that same year, the jetty was replaced by a wharf, funded by donations from local farmers and The Illawarra and South Coast Steam Navigation Company. Regular shipping commenced in 1862 with PS Mimosa being the first ship to moor. The wharf was designed by prominent colonial engineer, Ernest Orpen Moriarty, and built by R. Mowatt with the help of Daniel Gowing and John Kirkwood. Turpentine logs, from the North Coast, driven into solid rock. It was sited in its current location, due to the protection from southerly winds, though the northerly waves still caused enough damage to necessitate continual repairs, including re-piling and changing the location of the piles, as piling techniques improved. The steep road down to the wharf also caused problems, requiring extra teams of animals to haul the fully-laden carts back up the hill.

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The wharf from Tathra Beach

With the opening up of Crown Lands to free selection in 1861, the population rapidly expanded and the increased trade was reflected in major additions to the original wharf. A cargo shed was built in 1866. In 1868, the Bega-Tathra road was cleared to a width of one chain and in 1879, Tathra opened its first post office in Gowing’s Store, a general store and guesthouse, on the corner of the main road and the road down to the wharf.

Due to the expansion of  shipping needs and the increase in the size of visiting ships and depth of moorings, major extensions to the wharf were made in 1873; 1878; 1886; 1889; 1903 and 1912, under the guiding hand of another well-known colonial engineer, Ernest Macartney de Burgh. In 1901, cattle and pig yards were built. The route between Tathra and Sydney became known as ‘the Pig and Whistle Line’, due to the transport of pigs, produce and passengers between the two locations. Apparently, as the boats rounded the corner, they would always blow a whistle and the pigs would start squealing!

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View south from ‘Pig and Whistle Lookout’ on Tathra Headland to the point

In 1862, the Illawarra Steamship Company fleet consisted of 3 schooners : ‘Ellen’, ‘Gipsy’ and ‘Rosebud’; a clipper : ‘White Cloud’; and 3 steamers: a paddle steamer : ‘Hunter’ and 2 screw steamers : ‘John Penn’ and ‘Kameruka’, but the sailing ships were superseded by steamers after 1881.

The steamer service was crucial to the Far South Coast, as the roads were very poor and there was no railway service. The Princes Highway from Batemans Bay to the Victorian border was gravel up until the 1940s. Consequently, there was a chain of 15 reliable all-weather wharves up and down the coast, where the steamers would berth and deliver and pick up goods and passengers. Rixon’s wagon left Bega Post Office for Merimbula every Wednesday and Tathra on Mondays and Thursdays to take mail and passengers to and from the steamer. Produce from Tathra included : bacon, cheese, butter, timber, tallow, wattle bark, corn and wool. The boats would also carry prime beef and sheep, horses, pigs, poultry and turkeys, both for the Sydney markets and the Royal Easter Sydney Show. Mobs of up to 700 pigs would be walked to the wharf from local farms. One Bemboka farmer even walked her flock of turkeys over 50km to the wharf by coating her turkey’s feet in tar with a light dusting of sand! Ships arriving from Sydney brought tea, bags of flour and sugar, biscuits, farm machinery and parts, grains and seeds and household furniture.BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.34.38In 1907, the buildings were reconstructed and the present two-storey structure was built. Spring-loaded wrought iron buffers were introduced to assist the berthing of larger vessels in the difficult north-eastern seas. A mooring buoy was positioned north-east of the wharf, to which ships would attach a spring line. Between 1907 and 1912, there were more major extensions, including a subdeck; a jib crane to facilitate loading; a cattle race; a loading ramp and a passenger shelter. In 1914, soldiers and horses were farewelled from the wharf on their way to fight in the Great War. Here is an old photo of the volunteers leaving for the war, as seen on the noticeboard on Tathra Headland.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5533The increase in transport by road had a major effect on the amount of shipping trade everywhere, but because the Far South Coast had no adjacent railway line to carry bulk freight to Sydney, shipping trade lingered on till 1954. By 1919, the number of passengers travelling by sea had greatly decreased, so the passenger shelter was replaced by a single storey shed, next to the two-storey building. Freight and cargo became the predominant trade from Tathra. During World War II, enemy activity off the Far South Coast of NSW, including German mines and Japanese submarines, had a further impact on the amount of trading. The last ship to work cargo was the 1929 SS Cobargo in 1954 and the even older SS Bergalia was the last steamer to visit the wharf later that year to remove valuable items of wharf equipment. The Illawarra and South Coast Steam Navigation Company suspended trading in 1958.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5522BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5518Gradually, the wharf structure fell into disrepair and became unsafe, so a demolition order was issued in 1973. Fortunately, an active local group and National Trust banded together to oppose the demolition. The Tathra Wharf Trust was formed in 1977 and launched an appeal for the conservation and preservation of the old wharf. By 1982, only minor parts of the wharf, the mezzanine deck and a few of the more recent buildings had been demolished. The decking was replaced and the two-storey building was restored, the top storey becoming the Tathra Maritime Museum, dedicated to steamer history, and the bottom storey being used for a cafe and tourist outlet.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.36BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.44BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%ReszdIMG_5523Between 1982 and 2010, road access was  difficult, as one leg of the access loop road was closed by boulders after heavy seas smashed over the headland.These photos show the old road.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.56.55BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.55.32BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 13.55.16BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.57.35It is now the only coastal steamer wharf left on the NSW coast and 1 of only 6 timber wharves still listed for preservation on the Register of the National Estate, as well as the NSW State Heritage Register. It is such a beautiful old building with chunky solid wooden beams and spectacular views and it is a wonderful reminder of our shipping past. The cafe is so impressive and provides top-quality meals, which are beautifully presented. It is also a great venue for selling local arts and crafts – we have some highly creative artists and artisans in the area.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-04-10 14.41.49BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.38BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-05-01 14.36.12

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.31.50
Delicious Spiced Chai!

The wharf is also very popular with anglers, as well as seabirds!BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-04-10 15.04.28BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 13.09.34BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-05-01 14.28.05-1BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.34.40BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.33.44BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.35.04BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.47.37BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 13.14.01Tathra Beach has been a tourist destination from very early days. It is 3 km long and stretches from the wharf and Tathra Headland in the south to Moogareeka Inlet and the mouth of the Bega River to the north. It is protected from the Southerlies by the steep headland. Beach fishing yields :

  • Salmon, tailor and gummy shark – caught with pilchards, fresh fish fillets and stripy tuna;
  • Bream, whiting and mullet – using beach worms, pippies, prawns and fresh nippers as bait;    and
  • Sand whiting – caught using sand worms and nippers.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 13.34.05BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 14.16.44

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.29.24
Looking from Tathra Wharf back to Tathra Beach

It is a great spot for swimming with the Tathra Surf Club (formed in 1909) patrolling the beach every weekend from October to April, as well as Christmas Holidays and Public Holidays. Sail boarding, surfing and snorkelling off the wharf are also popular activities. It has been voted one of the cleanest beaches in NSW, which is not surprising, given the progressive and forward-thinking spirit of environmentally aware locals, who are establishing a solar farm in Tathra. See : http://cleanenergyforeternity.net.au/. Another very active local organization is the local volunteer fire brigade, which was established in 1945, with a 2nd new fire station built next-door in 2011. It is one of the most well-equipped fire brigades on the Far South Coast.BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.28.57BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-02-22 12.13.14

BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 15.28.38
When full, the blue water drum at the top tips its contents onto unsuspecting kids below!

Another tourism drawcard for Tathra is its proximity to 2 wonderful National Parks : Bournda National Park in the south with 13 km of unspoilt coastline and Mimosa Rocks National Park in the north, which extends for 16 km. I shall be discussing Moogareeka Inlet, Ford Headland and Moon Bay, all within the southernmost section of Mimosa Rocks National Park and 4 km north of Tathra, in a separate post next week (A Slice of History), but will focus now instead on the spectacular Kianinny Bay, just to the south of Tathra.

Kianinny Bay is a protected bay with immediate access to the ocean. It is sheltered from Northerly winds and is an incredibly beautiful spot in all weathers, as seen in these photos taken from Chamberlain Lookout above.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-02-22 13.38.51BlogTathraJewelCrown 80%Reszd2015-01-26 21.28.51 - CopyThe coastline between Tathra Headland and Kianinny Bay includes steep cliffs and rugged rock masses, providing wonderful opportunities for rock fishing, using cunjevoi, abalone guts and cabbage weed to catch Black Drummer, Silver Drummer, Leatherjacket, Groper, Luderick and Banded Morwong all year round. From December to May, Bunito, Kingfish, Tailor and Salmon can be caught with live baits.BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2014-11-07 14.26.35BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-04-10 14.36.47BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-10 10.46.21Tathra really is a fisherman’s paradise with its beach and rock fishing, reef and bottom fishing and estuary fishing, as well as all the freshwater streams and dams. The closest reef section is 6 km south of Tathra, 800 m out from White Rock and extending several kilometres out. Fish caught here include : Snapper, Morwong, Flathead, Leatherjacket and Gummy Shark. We found this flathead in a rock pool left high and dry on White Rock after the tide receded – a very easy catch (though we didn’t!)BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%ReszdIMG_2149BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%ReszdIMG_2146Boats leave Kianinny Bay to drift fish the outskirts of Tathra Bay, catching Sand Flathead and Tiger Flathead, using flesh baits and plastic jigs, and Gunnards and Gummy Sharks. Little wonder that Kianinny Bay is home to the Tathra Fishing Club. There are excellent boat launching facilities : a concrete boat ramp for vessels up to 7 m long; plenty of parking; areas to wash down the boats and tables to clean the fish, as well as a BBQ and picnic area and playground. Sting Rays regularly cruise up and down the shallows, competing for fish scraps with the local sea gulls and cormorants, and can be a little disconcerting for swimmers! Snorkelling and spear fishing are also popular. These photos show a very relaxed swimmer, two very large, friendly sting rays and a sea hare.

BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.31.21BlogTathraJewelCrown 70%Reszd2015-01-26 21.30.48BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 14.26.02Kianinny Bay forms the north-eastern tip of Bournda National Park and is the starting off point for the 9 km long Kangarutha Track, south through cliffs, rock debris and small inlets to Turingal Head. See : http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/Walking-tracks/Kangarutha-walking-track. I will be covering this national park and walking track in a later post. It is a beautiful walk with fabulous coastal views and plenty of bird and animal life, as well as interesting vegetation. I will finish with photos of a Golden Whistler on Tathra Headland, some stunning feral vegetation and a very street-wise local resident!BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%Reszdaug 2010 592BlogTathraJewelCrown 40%Reszdaug 2010 595BlogTathraJewelCrown 20%Reszd2015-10-11 12.11.37

For an explanation, see : https://candeloblooms.com/2015/10/13/birthday-blessings/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Show Time!

One of the delightful aspects of living in the country is the myriad of small local shows. Unfortunately, we missed the Candelo Show last year, as we had literally only just arrived and were so exhausted after all the unpacking, that we just didn’t have the energy to shower and change to go out and meet all the locals!!! However, because it is our local show and has a great reputation, we were determined to attend this year!

We did however manage to visit the Bega Show (or to give its full title : the Far South Coast National Show!) last February, which we thoroughly enjoyed. The Bega showground is in a lovely situation on the edge of town, with the mountains providing a scenic backdrop to the ring events.BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.26.17We started at the top of the hill with the Poultry section, one of my favourites, and the Animal Nursery, always a crowd pleaser!I loved this Light Sussex hen and Indian Runner duck.

BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.35.11BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.34.26Unfortunately, we missed the cattle, but we did see some beautiful Angora goats.BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.29.40BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.27.57I love country shows. They are a wonderful way to involve the entire community and a great opportunity to showcase the local produce and incredible talent in the area. With its wonderful climate and diversity of agricultural produce, Bega is a pretty special place when it comes to food from potatoes, sunflowers and corn to apples and pumpkins! I’ve never seen a fridge full of local cheeses and oysters before!BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.49.29BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.33.45BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.34.00BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.36.50The pumpkins were enormous! The one on the far right of the 3rd photo weighed 156 kg, netting its owner, an NM Watson, first prize!BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.34.30BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.38.26BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.33.30Then there is all the the home-made produce!BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.38.02And the fleece section…BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.54.24

I always love the flower section!BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.49.16BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 09.51.39BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.27.07The kids had a lot of fun decorating pumpkins and biscuits!BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.34.39BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.34.55BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 10.36.11As well as enjoying all the sideshows…!BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 12.24.28BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 12.24.36There was lots of input by local groups like the SCPA South East Producers and the Seedsavers’ Network, the Bega Valley Weavers, the Wyndham Basketeers and the Far South Coast Bird Club. It was a great show and the organizers deserved a well-earned break at the end of it.BlogItsShowtime20%Reszd2015-02-22 12.13.08

We looked forward to the start of the 2016 show season. Candelo Show, held last weekend on Sunday, 17th January, was one of the first to kick off, beaten only by Pambula Show on the 9th January. Here is the schedule for the rest of the shows for the Far South Coast of NSW, just in case you are visiting the area :

Eurobodalla Show 23-24 January; Nimmitabel Show 6 February; Cobargo Show 13-14 February; Bega Show 19-21 February; Delegate Show 6 March; Dalgety Show 6 March; Bemboka Show 12 March; Cooma Show 14 March and finally Bombala Show 19 March.

And so to this weekend.. the long-awaited 129th Candelo Show! The first Candelo Show was held in the School of Arts building on 21st December 1883 and in 1884, an area of 13.6 acres (5.53 hectares) was officially gazetted as the Candelo Showground.

It is in a lovely situation  on the side of the hill overlooking the arena, with the scenic backdrop of Mt Dromedary in the far distance.BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5709I love old show pavilions and all the exhibits. It’s such a great way for showcasing local produce and we were surprised by the size of the display for such a small area.

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The Kameruka Pavilion, built in 1907

BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5680The weather was perfect and the show was well attended by lots of families.  It’s wonderful seeing all the kids participating!BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5684BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5682

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A kid of a different kind in the Animal Nursery!

Candelo Show is a lovely little agricultural show in the true sense of the word, as there are no fairground rides, sideshows or show bags, which makes a refreshing change! Instead, there is a Kids Kastle, as well as Hobby Horse races and pony rides and lots of other activities like goat milking, Akubra hat throwing, the dog high jump and a chook washing demonstration.

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Waiting for the High Jump!

There were displays of historic machinery and vintage cars, as well as felting, spinning and woodworking demonstrations. There were a few food outlets for lunch; the famous Wheatley Lane sourdough bread, made just round the corner from our house; our favourite home-made icecream lady from Cobargo, who sells at the local markets; a watermelon shed and a few hopeful politician stands!BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5742BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5706Entertainment was provided by the Queanbeyan Pipe Band, as well as an Irish folk group and local musicians.BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5687BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5677BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5740We loved watching the ring events, especially the show jumping. There are some very talented local equestrians, some of them very young!BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5682 (2)BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5708It was a lovely day out and we finally got to see our cows!BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5700BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5704All inspired by the wonderful produce we had just seen, we returned to our garden to harvest our huge clump of rhubarb for rhubarb and apple crumble that night. It was delicious!!! Till next week…!BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5711BlogItsShowtime20%ReszdIMG_5741

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Favourite Late 20th Century Botanic Gardens

It is wonderful seeing the new directions in which botanic gardens are developing. Nature and environment are increasingly threatened as human populations continue to increase and botanic gardens are playing an increasingly valuable role as seed banks for the future and in the mitigation of climate change and environmental education of the public. As the pace of life becomes even more frenetic, they are also extremely important for relaxation and the soul!

1. Eurobodalla Regional Botanic Gardens, 42ha,  1986

http://www.erbg.org.au/

: Part of Mogo State Forest and leased back to the Eurobodalla Council for a Botanic Garden, it showcases the native plants of the Eurobodalla region and their diversity in form, colour, habitat requirements and sensory characteristics. It also explains their use as food and medicine by the local aboriginal people. Here are photos of their official map and interpretive board on the Aboriginal Heritage Walk:BlogLate20thCent BG 80%ReszdIMG_3636BlogLate20thCent BG 80%ReszdIMG_3641: There is a Visitor Centre , a Herbarium and 7km of walking tracks. It is a very impressive contemporary botanic garden.BlogLate20thCent BG 40%ReszdIMG_3690BlogLate20thCent BG 40%ReszdIMG_3691Above the lake, there is an amphitheatre for performances with audience seating set into the hill. I loved the random animal sculptures, including the little possum below, along one of the tracks.BlogLate20thCent BG 40%ReszdIMG_3706BlogLate20thCent BG 40%ReszdIMG_3709BlogLate20thCent BG 40%ReszdIMG_3725BlogLate20thCent BG 40%ReszdIMG_3713

2. Blue Mountains Botanic Garden, Mt. Tomah, 28ha, 1987

https://www.bluemountainsbotanicgarden.com.au/

: Located in the World-Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains, it is situated 1000 metres above sea level and showcases many beautiful native and exotic plants not suited to Sydney’s climate. It places an emphasis on cool-climate plants from around the world, especially those from the southern hemisphere. This is the view from the Visitor Centre with a stone labyrinth in the foreground. The 3rd photo shows the view from the pond looking back up to the Visitor Centre.BlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5029BlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5011BlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5086BlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5045: One of the few botanic gardens where plants have been grouped according to their geographical origin, allowing  the visitor to see both the similarities and differences between the plants of each region and understand the evolution of the floras of the different continents.BlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5060BlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5037: There are wonderful rockeries, water courses and waterfalls and bog gardens in front of the Visitor Centre, (which incidently has a fantastic view!), as well as woodlands, camellia and rhododendron collections and 2 interesting display gardens and walks: The Gondwana Forest Walk and the Plant Explorer walk with excellent interpretive boards. They are so impressive in fact, that we always call in to visit these botanic gardens whenever we are in the Blue Mountains.BlogLate20thCent BG 50%ReszdIMG_5132 - CopyBlogLate20thCent BG 20%ReszdIMG_5118: There is also a World Heritage exhibition centre called the  ‘Botanists Way Discovery Centre’, which tells the stories of early botanists who explored the northern Blue Mountains seeking rare plants and trying to find a crossing to the west, as well as those of the local  Darug people. The bookshop is excellent!

 3. Australian Botanic Garden, Mt. Annan, 416ha, 1988

http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/annan

: Even though we haven’t visited these yet, we hope to soon! They are the 3rd botanic garden, managed by the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, and they are the largest botanic garden in Australia, so I had to include them !!!

: Solely comprised of Australian native plants, they showcase the diversity of Australian flora and will eventually include most of Australia’s 25,000 known plant species. It contains a Bush Food Garden and the Australian Plant Bank with  a seed bank and research laboratories devoted to research and conservation of Australian native plant species, especially those of NSW. See : http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/annan/Australian_plantbank.

4. Royal Botanic Gardens, Cranbourne, 363ha,  1989 and The Australian Garden, 15ha, 2006

http://www.rbg.vic.gov.au/visit-cranbourne     and

http://www.rbg.vic.gov.au/visit-cranbourne/attractions/australian-garden

: Victoria’s equivalent of the previous botanic garden, it contains 363ha of remnant native vegetation, a protected site of state significance for biodiversity with 390 native plant species, 20 mammal species and 11 amphibian species. There are walking tracks through heathlands, woodlands and wetlands.BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszdmelbourne spring 184BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszdmelbourne spring 143

: The contemporary landscaped display beds of the Australian Garden contain 170,000 Australian native plants from 85 bioregions in Australia and follow the journey of water from the arid inland landscapes of Central Australia through dry river beds to major rivers and finally the coast.BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszdmelbourne spring 170BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszdmelbourne spring 148

: The art and architecture are very modern and Australian and the presentation of the garden is very stunningly dramatic.BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszdmelbourne spring 116BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszdmelbourne spring 106

: Display gardens also feature contemporary garden issues like the Backyard garden, for kids as well as adults, Lifestyle Gardens, the Greening of Cities, even the Weird and Wonderful! A day is not long enough to explore this amazing garden and it is constantly evolving, so there is always something new to discover!

5. Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden, Port Augusta, SA, 250ha, 1993

http://www.aalbg.sa.gov.au

: Located on the shores of the Spencer Gulf, with spectacular views of the Flinders Ranges, this coastal park features significant areas of natural arid zone vegetation including Western Myall woodlands (Acacia papyrocarpa) and chenopod (Saltbush) plains together with coastal vegetation dominated by Grey Mangrove (Avicennia marina) and samphire.

: There are many  highly evolved plant communities that are specially adapted to thrive in an environment where temperatures are extreme and drought prolonged and this botanic garden was established to research, conserve and promote a wider appreciation of Australia’s arid zone flora. In fact, it is  the only botanic garden in the world to specialize in the conservation and display of flora from the southern arid zone of Australia (where the annual rainfall is less than 250mm). Regional collections currently include : Flinders Ranges, Gawler, Eyre, Central Ranges and Great Victoria Desert, with further arid areas planned in the future.

: Sustainability is a large part of their charter and sustainable design and  practices has been successfully incorporated into these gardens including the use of : solar panels, a Waste Water Treatment Plant, rain water collection, underground evaporative air‐conditioning ducts,  an award winning energy-efficient Visitor Centre with rammed earth walls, LED lighting, recycling and the sale of locally produced ecoproducts. I am really looking forward to visiting it one day !!!

And finally, because it is a fairly new botanic garden and we have a personal connection :

6. Gold Coast Regional Botanic Park (Rosser Park), 31ha, 2002

http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/documents/bf/promo-booklet-botanic-gardens.pdf

: The land for these botanic gardens was donated in 1969 by the Rosser Family, who are relatives of my husband. John Rosser was a very good friend of Ross’s uncle Alf, who was killed at Pozières in World War I and married Alf’s sister Essie. He was a man ahead of his times in so many ways and was vitally interested in many social issues from education to politics, peace activism, environment , self-sufficiency, gardening, beekeeping and  health.  John and Essie were both vegetarians and both lived well into their nineties. The couple led simple, non-materialistic lives and valued lifestyle over possessions.They raised 6 highly intelligent, well educated, high achieving children, who all returned to their self-sufficiency roots in later life.

: I remember visiting their daughter Jean and their beautiful old home and garden on a hill at  ‘Benowa’ when I was newly married. I struck my first successful rose cutting from their old bush of ‘Countess Bertha’. It was such an interesting place with 4 types of plumbing in the kitchen, lots of unopened packets of hardware on the backs of doors, bookcases of folders and folders of newspaper clippings and scrapbooks and a glass-less lounge window overlooking the beautiful garden and the blue Springbrook mountains beyond the Nerang River. Only now, there is a mass of brick houses between their property and those mountains, as the Gold Coast had grown and developed!!! If ever there was an antidote to the urban sprawl and concrete jungle of the Gold Coast, this garden is it and I think John would be very happy to know his donated land has been put to such good use!

: It includes a sensory garden, specially designed for the disabled, a native butterfly garden, a rose garden, native plants, a montane rockery, freshwater wetlands and a Mangroves to Mountains walk. There are also Commemorative Avenues of Queensland forest giants planted by the Curators of Australia’s Botanic Gardens and International Friendship Force, a nonprofit cultural exchange organization promoting friendship  and goodwill through a program of home-stay exchanges since 1977, a concept I’m certain John would have wholeheartedly embraced. We are really looking  forward to visiting this botanic garden next time we go to Queensland!

The 1st photo below shows my old rosebush, which I grew from the cutting. The 2nd photo shows my current ‘Countess Bertha’ rose bloom.

BlogLate20thCent BG 30%ReszdIMG_0626BlogLate20thCent BG 20%Reszd2015-11-22 17.16.40Next month, I will be starting to write about my favourite gardens, which are regularly open to the public, including historic homes and gardens, nursery gardens, specialty nursery gardens, education gardens and  sculpture gardens. In the mean time, enjoy all those wonderful botanic gardens!


 

 

 

Year’s End in Candelo

It is amazing to think that we have been here almost a full year! Candelo is such a beautiful little village, full of history and charm, and we are so happy that we live here! We arrived just after the re-opening of the General Store, which has been a major boost to the life and energy of the town. The first general store opened in the early 1860s and was soon followed by a Post Office (1st and 2nd photos), school and churches, until the town took over the role of Kameruka as the main provider to the local population. The first town blocks were surveyed and sold in 1865.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-22 11.53.04BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_1508St Peter’s Anglican Church was also designed by the Blacket brothers (sons of Edmund, who designed the church at Kameruka- see previous post) and built in 1906.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.59.25BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.58.54There was also a hospital (1888), a lovely pink Catholic Church (St. Josephs) at the top of the hill (naturally!) and an old convent. The old hospital and convent are now private residences.

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The old hospital
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St. Joseph’s Catholic Church
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The old convent
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The old convent has a beautiful garden

We always enjoy our walk up the opposite hill to our house, as it provides a wonderful birds’ eye view of the village, especially in Winter when all the deciduous trees have lost their leaves. Just about every house in Candelo has a stunning view of the mountains. These photos show the view of the mountains to the north; Candelo in Winter and Summer, looking back to our side of the valley and ‘a horse with a view’!BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_2752BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-09-06 16.33.39BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 12.40.56BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 12.47.30In its heyday, Candelo had 3 hotels; 3 blacksmiths- all along Sharpe Street, which is why we are constantly digging up old ironware!; a bakery; 3 butchers; a chemist and its own doctor; a hospital built in 1888;  a tailor, a hardware store; banks; a School of Arts and Literary Institute; a newspaper and 3 general stores. The first newspaper ‘The Candelo & Eden Union’ began publication in May 1882. In the early 1900s, ‘The Candelo Guardian’ also operated for 6 years and eventually, the two newspapers amalgamated into ‘The Southern Record’ and continued until 1938. Here are some more photos of the old buildings, now mostly residences, along Sharpe St on our side of the creek : the old general store, which stood to the right of the blacksmiths; an old beauty salon; Candelo Pub; more old stores on our corner; The Crossing Gallery, reopening in February 2016; my neighbour’s house (2 photos); her walking bridge across the gully between her house and garden; and finally, another rustic wooden bridge across the gully on the other side of the street.BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_3023BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_3025BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_3024BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-22 11.38.43BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-22 11.38.29BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-22 12.17.15BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-22 10.52.23BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-11 09.21.20BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-22 11.39.44We were fortunate to be able to view an album of historic photographs of the village, mostly taken by Robert Hayson :

Looking across Candelo Creek from the main street to our neighbour’s blue house and the old storesBlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0592
Dated 1908, this photo shows our neighbour’s house marked ‘Commercial Bank’ and the hill behind. I’m glad the road has improved!BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0598
Our neighbour’s house, marked as ‘Board of Residence’ in this photoBlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0593
Looking back across the bridge from our side of the creek to William St and the old School of Arts building 1881, which burnt down and was replaced by the Town Hall in 1930.BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0594
A 1910 postcard of William St with a closeup of DH Clark’s Royal Hotel and the footbridge, which had been washed away. A little cynicism with the Greetings message perhaps?!BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0597
Main St with Royal HotelBlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0599
William St : a grocery store in the background, the hotel and then a store owned by Mr Collins, where the General Store now standsBlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_0600
Abraham Levy started the Candelo General Store in 1879, site unknown, then built in the current location in 1882. A fire destroyed the building in 1903 and a new store in its current form was built on the same site in 1904. It has changed hands many times in its 110 year old history and is now owned and run by the Moffitt Family. It is open for breakfasts, lunches and the odd Friday night dinner, as well as providing very well-priced groceries and garden supplies. We feel so lucky to have such a great store so nearby.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.21.39BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.21.50BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_2758And we love Barry’s old cars!!! Especially his truck advertising that ‘cosy local wives would fire!!!’BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-22 11.58.27BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 14.28.00BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 13.06.27BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-28 11.10.41Unfortunately,  the advent of the motor car and better roads saw the demise of the town as the predominant shopping venue, but ‘progress’ is often a two-edged sword! Perhaps, it is also the reason that so many historic buildings  are still intact and have not been demolished to make way for modern shopping complexes – horror of horrors!!! Candelo is an urban conservation area and has a  charming atmosphere, which has attracted many artists and musicians to the area. Here are some photos of William St today…

From left down the street  : Town Hall, Eric’s Garage, Leanne’s parlour, the old hotel, the General Store and the Post Office. The bridge is on the right of this photo.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.54.57Eric’s paraphenalia! Eric is the go-to man if ever there is a problem or you need information.

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Closeup of Town HallBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.54.29Looking down William St from the shade of the old plane treeBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.55.50The old bank, still with its vault intact, across from the Town HallBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.54.50BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-30 03.12.48Bridge across Candelo Creek to our side. Eden St goes straight up the hill. You can just see our laneway on the right.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 16.13.22We have a wonderful organization called the Candelo Arts Society (http://www.candelovillagefestival.org/), which holds great  performances at least once or twice a month in the Town Hall or St. Peter’s Anglican Church, as well as the wonderful Candelo Village Festival every two years. The first one was in 2008. Here are some photos from the 2015 Candelo Village Festival :

From left to right : Scott Cook (Canada); Frank Yamma (Australia); Melanie Horsnell (local) in the foreground, backed by Azadoota.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 11.25.13Talented duos, from left to right : Sweet Jean (Victoria); Kate and Ruth (local) and Elegant Aliens (local)BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 12.45.50Leanne’s Ragtime Parlour. She often opens her front door and plays on market days. It sounds wonderful!BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.20.46BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.20.33We felt very proud of ourselves, erecting this stage on the back of Barry Moffitt’s old truck!BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.23.26Kids’ artwork on the streetBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.21.02Queen Porter StompBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.33.54Jordan C Thomas BandBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 13.44.11Nighttime marketsBlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 19.06.21BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 19.05.56The Tricksters’ Caravan of Wonders : there are some wonderful talented young performers out there!BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 19.07.21The Festival entrance was flanked by creative bamboo cane structures, covered with greenery and lit from within, to create a magical nighttime atmosphere!BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-03-28 19.07.43Proceeds from the organization are fed back into community projects like the wonderful full length swimming pool. The water laps the edge of the lawn and the view over grazing cattle and green paddocks is sublime! Often, we get it totally to ourselves if we swim in the early afternoon on a week-day.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 12.55.02BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 15.07.41BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 15.20.37BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 15.07.57It’s a very active community with lots happening from flamenco to Spanish lessons (1st photo); a Beginner’s Orchestra, where the only rule is that you haven’t played the instrument before!; an active Land Care group; Social Tennis every Friday morning with  Tuesday night comps (2nd photo); a Kindergarten and school (see 5th and 6th photos); a bowls club (7th photo); a police station and fire station; another cafe and deli (Two Blokes’ Food Cafe); a wonderful wood-fired sourdough bakery ‘Wheatley Lane’, just around the corner from us;  a very well-known large market on the 1st Sunday of every month (3rd and 4th photo) and a cute Agricultural Show in January, which has been held since 1883. I will be writing a post about the 2016 Candelo Show in mid-January.

BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-22 12.13.51BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 16.19.00BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-30 11.41.55BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-30 11.42.08BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 15.59.51BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 13.00.18BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-15 13.00.07It’s such a beautiful area , backed by the South East Forests National Park and scenic beauty spots like Six Mile Creek, rolling lush green paddocks and dairy farms and a stunningly beautiful coastline, only 20 minutes away. We lie half way between the old agricultural service centre Bega and touristy coastal Merimbula, so have easy access to both. We always enjoy our drives to either town. I will finish with some photos of Candelo Creek and Bega River en route to Bega, then the country drive to Merimbula.

Here  are the photos of the drive to Bega :BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-10 12.14.00BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-10 12.10.38BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-07 08.25.43BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-11-10 15.08.03BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-07 08.33.24BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-07 08.37.38BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-10-10 12.10.31BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-07 08.35.58BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-07 11.41.14BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-28 16.44.45BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-03 16.11.12BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-02-07 08.33.28BlogyearEndCandelo50%ReszdIMG_2530.jpgAnd photos of the drive to Merimbula. I will describe the wonderful Potoroo Palace in more detail in my post on local wildlife venues later in the year.BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-28 16.47.01BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-10 12.57.10BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_2620BlogyearEndCandelo20%ReszdIMG_2616BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-01-27 12.18.24

We feel so privileged to live in this very special area!BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-04-26 17.12.26BlogyearEndCandelo20%Reszd2015-07-11 16.17.31