Feature Plant for December: Zinnias With Zing!

I just LOVE Zinnias! They are so bright, happy and colourful and always brighten up the day. I do not know of any flower with more zing than a zinnia!!!BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0337 They are such easy plants to cultivate, growing quickly and blooming heavily and providing long-lasting colour in the Summer flower bed, as well as attracting bees, birds and butterflies.BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0294 The Zinnia genus (Photo 1 below) belong to the sunflower tribe (Heliantheae) (Photo 2 below) and the daisy family (Asteraceae) (photo 3 below) and  and comprises of 22 species of annuals, perennials and small shrubs, though the species, with which we are most familiar, Zinnia elegans, is an annual. BlogAutumngardenReszd2017-04-27 13.30.41BlogZinnia3018-01-11 10.38.09 BlogZinnia3018-02-24 09.55.00-2Since selective breeding began in the 19th century, there are now over 100 cultivars and an increasing number of interspecific hybrids. BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_0684They were named after the German botanist Johann Gottfried Zinn (1727 – 1759).blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0361

Distribution and Habitat:

Zinnias are native prairie plants, which grow in the scrub and dry grasslands from the South-West United States (the majority of species) to Argentina, South America ( a few species), with the centre of diversity being Mexico, so they love hot temperatures, full sun and long hot Summers and are very drought-tolerant.BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0260Description:

Zinnias come in a huge range of shapes, sizes and colours, so there is a zinnia to suit every situation! Even within the one plant, the shape of its blooms vary widely.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-23-29 The classic zinnia has a long sturdy single erect stem, 10 t0 100 cm tall, with soft downy opposite stalkless linear to ovate pale to mid green leavesBlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_7014 and topped by a single flower.BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_0187 Zinnia elegans has tall forms and dwarf varieties like the knee-high Magellan series (35 cm or 14 inches tall) and the tiny Thumbelina series (15-20 cm or 6 to 8 inches), while Zinnia angustifolia, especially the Crystal series is a creeping ground cover and is extremely drought-tolerant.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0337 The Profusion series is a cross between Z. elegans and Z. angustifolia and has good disease-resistance.BlogAprilGarden20%Reszd2016-04-10 18.36.07Flowers range from the simple single daisy-like form with an open centre and conspicuous disc and ray florets to semi-double and double forms (most modern varieties), the disc florets of the latter being much less obvious or absent. BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_0673The ‘true’ flowers, which produce the nectar are the tiny yellow florets.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-15-30-41 They have many different forms, described as : Cactus/ quill-like (long narrow petals); dahlia type; pompom spheres or buttons and domes; stars; and spiders. I love the form of the buds and the emerging quills!BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_6974BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_6976BlogZinnia5018-04-10 08.55.29 (3)blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-14-12-34-12BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0059They come in every colour, except for blue, and I have even seen two different coloured flowers on the one plant. As they age, the colours change and deepen.BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_0972Here in Australia, they bloom for a long time from Summer (end of January) through to Autumn (April/May).blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0335

Cultivation and propagation:

Zinnias are such easy tough plants to grow! I sowed the seed of Lambley’s Dahlia Flowered Mix in late 2015, the first year of my cutting garden, resulting in masses of flowers! BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0258They self-seeded with plants coming up in the nearby flower and vegetable beds in the Summer of 2016-2017 and I even had a few last season, though I think it is now time to sow fresh seed!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-01-21-06-19 Lambleys have a number of different hybrids. See: https://lambley.com.au/flower-seed-catalogue/z?items_per_page=25.

Zinnias are propagated from seed and should be sown directly into the garden, as their developing roots do not like disturbance, though having said that, I have transplanted zinnias once they have grown into sturdy young plants. They should be sown after the last frost and when the soil is warm. David Lambley often sows his seed in late November, early December, so I still have time to get some new seed sown!BlogZinnia25%IMG_4990 Sow seeds 1 cm deep and 8 cm apart, thinning to 30 cm apart when the first true leaves have formed, so there is plenty of air flow and powdery mildew doesn’t develop. A 60 cm tall plant will need a space of 45 cm between plants.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0998They can also be started indoors 4 to 6 weeks before the last frost and sown in peat pots, which can be planted straight into the garden.BlogZinnia5018-04-05 10.16.05-2Sow in fertile humus-rich well-drained soil in full sun and keep the soil moist, but not soggy, for young plants. Once they are established, only water as required (once a week if that!) and always water the base of the plant (never overhead) in the early morning, so the foliage and flowers have time to dry off before the evening.

Avoid cold draughts and wind, especially for the taller varieties. Otherwise, being prairie plants, they are tough, withstanding drought and tolerant of poor soils, including hard clay. They will shade out the weeds and do not require mulch.BlogAprilGarden20%Reszd2016-04-10 18.30.54Seed usually germinates in 7 to 10 days and it takes 60 to 70 days (seed to flower) for the plants to bloom. Deadhead regularly to extend the flowering season. Pinching back the plants will result in a bushier plant and constant trimming encourages further blooms.BlogAprilGarden20%ReszdIMG_0191 (2)

Diseases include:

Powdery mildew: Plant disease-resistant varieties like Zahara zinnias or the Profusion series; never water overhead; ensure plenty of air circulation and avoid overcrowding; camouflage tall, disease-affected stems with a foreground of other plants; and finally, live with it! It only affects the leaves and stems, not the wonderful flowers, though of course, disease-affected plants can be removed if too unsightly!blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-04-10-23-22Leaf spot and leaf blight: also caused by fungi. To prevent, remove the debris from the base of the plant and keep the stems clean. Long wet Summers can be a problem!BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0056Save the seed by removing the old dried spent blooms and harvesting the small arrow-head shaped seeds. Store seed in a cool dark dry place, then sow directly in the following late Spring.BlogAprilGarden20%Reszd2016-04-07 14.14.09Uses:

Garden Plant

Because of their huge variety in shape, colour and size; their fast propagation, ease of growth and low maintenance; their drought-tolerance and toughness; and their long-lasting colourful displays all Summer, zinnias are a very popular garden flower, especially in cottage gardens and cutting gardens.BlogAutumngardenReszd20%IMG_1019There is a zinnia for every situation. The tall forms of Z. elegans look great at the back of the border, while the dwarf forms look wonderful along paths. Z. angustifolia, especially the Crystal series, is often grown at the front of borders, in raised beds or containers and as a ground cover. They can even grow in weightless environments like the International Space Station!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0332They also make excellent companion plants for tomatoes, capsicums and beans- they self-seeded to the tomato patch and next to the beans last year!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0794blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_1046 BlogAutumngardenReszd2017-04-27 13.07.27BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_0655They attract bees for pollination and birds, especially hummingbirds, which eliminate white fly, and are a butterfly magnet par excellence!blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0028BlogAutumngardenReszd2017-04-03 13.48.38 The latter prefer the flat single varieties rather than the double forms.BlogZinnia3018-04-05 16.26.06-1Floristry

With their long vase life (5 to 7 days), huge range in colour and form and sturdy tall stems, zinnias are also popular in the cut flower trade.blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-02-02-11-23-45BlogAprilGarden20%Reszd2016-04-15 12.05.08 Their stems should be harvested at an angle above the bud joint, the bottom 2 cm recut on a sharp angle and the leaves stripped off most of the stem.BlogAutumngardenReszd2017-05-12 10.49.40 Use preservative in the vase and replenish the water daily.blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0356 They are not ethylene sensitive.BlogZinnia2016-01-01 01.00.00-11 In the Language of Flowers, a bouquet of mixed zinnias mean ‘Thinking of absent friends’,BlogAutumngardenReszd2517-05-06 11.16.50

while yellow zinnias denote ‘daily remembrance’;blogsummer-gardenreszd20%2017-01-16-13-36-39BlogMarchGarden20%ReszdIMG_0660 white zinnias ‘pure goodness’; blogsummer-gardenreszd20img_0462magenta zinnias ‘lasting affection’;BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_6949 and red zinnias ‘steadfastness and familial ties’.BlogAutumngardenReszd2017-04-29 20.26.32 BlogAutumngardenReszd2017-04-18 12.12.28Obviously, I was thinking about absent friends in April when making my colourful zinnia cushion!

BlogFeltBooks2016-04-14 14.02.47BlogZinnia2016-04-10 18.10.32BlogZinnia2016-04-14 14.01.48BlogZinnia2016-04-14 14.02.11

 

 

The Winter Garden

Winter is finally coming to a close! The first two months (June/ July) were very cold, with heavy frosts, which were much worse than last year, damaging all the fresh new growth on the citrus trees (first photo) and almost completely destroying our beautiful native frangipanis, which had been doing so well (second photo). Hopefully, they will recover this Spring!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.51.56BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-23 11.01.35Most of the salvias in the Moon Bed, a large area of agapanthus slope (1st photo) and the giant bamboo and the pots of succulents, daisies and aloe vera were also hit, and even the pink rock orchid (2nd photo) and the elkhorn (3rd photo), both of which should have been safe in their relatively protected positions! Luckily, they are both tough and show signs of recovery.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-23 10.56.32BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-23 14.42.40BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.54.51Heavy frost certainly sorts out your plant selection! Only the tough survive!!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-27 10.52.38BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-28 10.43.18Winter frosts also mean blue and gold sunny days and cold Winter nights and while the Winter Garden takes a holiday from blooming, we still did plenty of work in the garden, preparing for the new season, as well as exploring the local area and enjoying the Winter fires (both in the house and a friend’s bonfire night) and indoor activities.

I will start this post with an overall review of the garden in each month, followed by a recap of our garden jobs; creative pursuits and exploratory days out.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-28 10.53.21BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0253June saw the end of the Autumn foliage (1st photo above of the Japanese Maple), a bounty of ivy berries for the bowerbirds (2nd photo above) and the last of the late roses. The photos below are, in order: Stanwell Perpetual; and David Austin roses, Heritage and LD Braithwaite.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-28 10.45.22BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-28 10.46.56BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-28 10.46.36from which I made my birthday bouquet below: David Austin Roses: Heritage; Eglantyne; Fair Bianca; and William Morris; Feverfew; purple and white Dames’ Rocket; violets; Ziva Paperwhites and Buddleja foliage.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-30 13.04.00BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-14 13.29.16BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-06 13.49.24 From then on, it was vases of violets and Winter bulbs: Galanthus; Erlicheer and Ziva Paperwhites, all of which are flourishing in their new positions and naturalising well.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.44.24BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0215BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-20 11.51.42BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0177BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-20 14.56.25 Other June bloomers included: Primulas and Primroses; BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 11.51.28BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.44.01Winter Honeysuckle and Winter Jasmine;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-20 16.11.03BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 17.39.25 and Japanese Anemones and Wallflowers. Lots of  whites; purples; lemons and yellows, with sharp sweet clean scents! The bees just adore the wallflowers!BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0179BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-27 13.22.48BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-11 14.43.38There were also the richer colours of gold and red in the Hill Banksia and the Grevillea. BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-07 13.46.16BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0192 The first crop of our citrus was also very encouraging, though I should have harvested the limes and lemonades earlier before the frost damaged them! Seen below are photos of our lime tree; lemon crop (cumquats in background) and lemonade tree.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-05 14.56.44BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-05 14.58.27BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0307BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0153 I was very impressed with the sweetness of our first and only Navel Orange!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-06 12.34.34In July, I was also very excited to see the emergence of our first Winter Aconite, which I had bought at great expense from Moidart Rare Plants last Spring, planted in the Treasure Bed and then waited for signs of life for months, resigning myself to the thought of having totally lost it! Now, it needs to multiply, then I will try naturalising it in the bird bath lawn with the Galanthus, which enjoys similar requirements.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-03 16.17.01BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-08 14.18.30By late July, the leucojums (photo above) and hellebores had joined in. The first photo below is the corner of my neighbour’s garden by our shed. I can’t wait till our hellebores spread like that!!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 17.32.16BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 11.35.04 While I love the single form of Helleborus orientalis (above), I’m rather partial to the double forms: Purple, White and Red;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.46.25BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 17.25.46BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-27 13.01.51BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 17.26.11 as well as the rarer species hellebores: Helleborus x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 14.58.49The japonicas, daphne and camellias also really picked up their game in early August, having been a bit shy to shine this year!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-03 11.53.57BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-03 11.51.00 I felt they bloomed much earlier last year with its milder Winter. The first photo below is the view from our bedroom window!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-20 17.21.20BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-28 12.22.48BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-26 10.23.23BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 17.54.20BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-04 16.19.28I was delighted to have more flowers for the house.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-24 16.24.41BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-24 16.25.14While June and July can sometimes feel a bit long, I love the quickening pace of August with its increasing day length, resulting in miniscule changes in the garden, which gives such a sense of hope, anticipation and excitement: The tiny leaf buds swelling on the  trees (photo is the quince tree), shrubs and roses;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.53.12 The shooting of tulips and iris in the cutting garden, naturalised bluebells, crocus and Poets’ daffodils in the lawn and hyacinth and grape hyacinth in the treasure bed;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.43.48 and the celebratory blooming of miniature Tête à Tête daffodils and golden Winter Sun;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-23 19.21.12BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-20 11.48.16BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-24 16.39.37BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-20 11.56.09BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-22 14.46.57 Magnificent golden Wattle;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 13.31.09BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 13.31.15 Early Spring blossoms: Crab Apple; Plum and Birch;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-27 10.55.37BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-27 10.55.07BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-24 09.31.42 And the blooms of forget-me-knots, golden-centred white paper daisies and begonias.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 11.42.00BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-23 19.21.45BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-20 12.02.09The birds are also revelling in the return of Spring!BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0243BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 16.03.40BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-14 11.27.57BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-14 11.29.22 While the Winter trees were full of Currawongs, Crimson Rosella and Grey Butcher Birds (photos above in order), the tiny Striated Pardalotes have returned to the Pepperina tree, where their beautiful song marks the return of Spring.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 14.42.08BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 15.18.05BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 13.11.38Eastern Spinebills and Yellow-faced Honeyeaters are also enjoying the August sun.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-20 13.54.15BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 14.57.55The Bowerbirds have been feasting in great numbers on the new loquat crop, stealing a march on the Summer flying foxes!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 17.06.59BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 17.09.28They also enjoy a swim in the bird bath, when not picking off my erlicheer blooms!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 15.59.05BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 15.59.23

BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.47.19The magpies have been busy building their nest high in the Pepperina tree since late July. Can you see it up there?BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-07-30 15.06.56BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-28 12.07.26BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-11 11.37.45BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-27 10.57.23 Despite their vicious swooping assaults on any large bird foolish enough to come anywhere near their territory, they are incredible quiet with us, often waiting patiently within a metre of us while weeding for an easy meal.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-24 13.15.57BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-24 13.13.06I was very excited with the return of last year’s baby White-faced Herons, to check out the old family home in the cottonwood poplar. BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-09 10.25.02We are crossing our fingers that they will nest there again, despite the magpies’ plans to the contrary! They seem to think that they own all the trees in the garden – in fact, quite possibly our house as well, though Oliver (2nd and 3rd photo below) might have something to say about that!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-24 18.11.14BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-23 09.50.49BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-23 09.53.30 The nurturing aspects and bird-viewing potential of our neighbour’s giant tree makes up for its vigorous, and dishearteningly constant, propensity to shoot out roots deep into the soil under our vegetable beds! Raised vegetable beds are definitely part of our future garden plans!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-07 09.25.08BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-07 09.25.12Winter is a great time to clean up the old garden and prepare for the new season! Weeding has been a major job: the aforementioned battle between the cottonwood poplar and our vegetable garden; the Cutting Garden ( 1st photo); the Soho Bed (2nd photo) and Moon Bed; and the new Shed Garden.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.51.35BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-24 12.25.49We pruned all the old messy and dead growth: the feverfew and dames’ rocket in the Cutting Garden and the salvias and Paris daisy in the Moon Bed; the hydrangeas in late June and all the roses in late July; BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-27 14.54.15and lastly, all the old dead wood of the feral and incredibly prickly Duranta, creating a new semi-shady area to grow a white shrub bed, as well as lots of work, cleaning away all the lethal spiky offcuts! We transplanted the Viburnum mariesii plicatum, which was struggling in its old position in full shade; the white lilac, which really was out of place and would have eventually been too large for its location, and four Annabel hydrangea rooted cuttings from my sister’s garden at Glenrock.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 17.24.49BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.54.01 The neighbour’s cats were fascinated by this brand new garden, but I’m not sure how their feet fared! The tubs were protecting my Galanthus from being demolished by trampling feet as well!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-07 12.47.03We also transplanted the pomegranate and red azalea from the bottom of the garden to the entrance of the main pergola and the red border of the native garden respectively to make room for a future garden shed, which will hopefully be built in the next few months.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 17.24.06Winter is a great time for garden planning and reorganization, as well as for building structures!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-11 18.02.49BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-11 14.46.06 Ross has built a fantastic rose frame, using steel posts and weld mesh from old gates, against the old shed wall to support and effectively control our Albertine ramblers, which would otherwise take over the camping flat completely!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-11 18.00.22 I can’t wait to see the future wall of salmon pink roses!blogspeciesrosesreszd20%2016-11-16-09-47-07We dug up the area underneath for a mixed dahlia bed, the plants hiding the bare legs of the climbing roses and blooms taking up the baton after the Albertine has finished. BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-20 14.59.06 This decision has also freed up the old dahlia bed for a future Brassica crop, though we have reserved the front third for Iceland poppies!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-21 13.34.29We also finally put up the weld mesh on the top of the Main Pergola to support this year’s Summer growth of the climbing roses!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-27 15.25.57Ross is getting very organized in the vegie garden! He has defined the edges of the vegetable and cutting garden beds with old weatherboards;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-06 14.12.02BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-04 16.33.09 Confined all the raspberry plants to their own bed near the compost heap; planted two more blueberries, all in different stages (leaf bud; flowers; and Autumn foliage!);BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-06 14.40.12 Transplanted the rhubarb, asparagus and Russian tarragon to the new perennial vegetable garden (the northeast bed, which grew tomatoes and raspberries last year) and the snow peas to the corner of the compost heap, allowing some to stay and climb up the raspberries; pruned the old raspberry canes, transplanting the new Heritage runners to their own run and extending the old run with the Chilcotin and Chilliwack varieties;  and sown Calendula seed at the front of the bed.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-21 13.58.28BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-21 13.50.07 In the remaining space of the perennial bed, he will plant pumpkins and zucchinis, letting them rambler down the bottom corner. He will then rotate between the two old main beds, which will grow potatoes (with later cucumbers) and beans, carrots, beetroot, with the current parsley and rocket in one bed; and kale, silverbeet, shallots, snow peas and lettuce and the two new ex-cutting garden beds, which will house early Spring brassicas (cabbage, cauliflower and brussel sprouts), and solanums (tomatoes, capsicum and aubergines) this year, though he has promised to allow any self-sown sunflowers or zinnias from the old beds to co-exist. Here are photos of our Winter vegie bed, with kale; ornamental chard; snow peas; broccoli; Spring onions and carrot seedlings just up!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.51.02BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.50.51Meanwhile, I have been busy with the flower beds! I have transplanted overcrowded self-seeded rose campion and catmint to their new positions in the Moon and Soho Beds; planted gold and soft purple Bearded Iris to the back of the shed beds;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.53.39 and created a complete silver ring of Lambs’ Ear to define the border of the Soho Bed. Stachys lanata is so tough, it didn’t even miss a beat on division and transplantation and, once established, will certainly make it difficult for any external invasion of weeds and grass! I love the downy soft feel of its foliage!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-06 14.12.20 We planted our new roses from Thomas Roses in the Shed Bed (Mme Hardy; York and Lancaster; Rosa Mundi and Chapeau de Napoleon); on the flat (Maigold) and on the Main Pergola (Souvenir de St Anne).BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-06 16.27.24BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-06 17.07.37 Ross also dug up an area on the terrace under the Pepperina tree and divided the old clivia clumps, so we can enjoy a swathe of orange in Summer.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-08 14.28.27This month, we have started sowing seed  in punnets under a plastic poly-tunnel on the warm path for plants to be later transplanted after the frosts: Heartsease (already up) and Scabiosa; Aquilegia and Honesty; Green Nicotiana and Gaillardia, which has already emerged at two weeks; Yarrow and Echinaceae; and Sea Holly and Green Wizard Coneflower, though we should have read the fine print on the latter, as we later discovered that  they need a constant 20 degrees Celsius to allow them to germinate! In lieu of an incubator tray, we have been carting them in and out of the house each day!!!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-03 12.54.44BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-18 18.56.01We have also sown seed directly in the garden: Nigella, Miss Jekyll Blue, and pink oriental poppies, Princess Victoria Louise,  in the Soho and Moon Beds (photo below); Cerinthe major and burgundy-blue-and white mixed cornflowers (‘Fireworks’) in the shed garden; and Iceland poppies in the cutting garden (and third of the potato bed, as they are one if Ross’s favourite flowers!!!) You can see why I can’t wait for Spring!!!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-04 15.19.03The Winter kitchen has also been a hive of activity with a first batch of lime cordial, made from our very own limes;BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0183 28 jars of cumquat marmalade from 6.6 kg fruit, with still more setting and ripening on the trees!;BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0298BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0302 and making lemon cupcakes for a birthday, as well as lots of warming Winter soups!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-01 11.24.25BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-01 11.25.22On the colder, greyer days, I have enjoyed embroidering diatoms on a felt;BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0091 discovered the joys of making cords using a Kumihimo disc;BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0092BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0094 learnt to crochet a flower chain;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-16 12.24.22 and made another embroidery roll for a friend.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 16.00.45BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-08-14 15.46.43The majority of the days have had blue-and-gold days, as in sunny blue skies, perfect for exploring our beautiful local area:

Haycocks Point;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-01 14.21.09BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-01 15.19.08Canoeing on the Murrah River to the Murrah Lagoon and the sea, where architect, Philip Cox,  built his holiday home;BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0335BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0398BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0551BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0549BlogWinterGardenReszd20%IMG_0578Exploring Bombala and Delegate, platypus country and part of the ancient aboriginal pathway, the Bundian Way;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-04 13.13.41BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-04 12.56.29BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-04 15.11.21BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-04 15.40.14Visiting On the Perch, Tathra, with its amazing range of birds, organized into their different environments, including this Emerald Dove and Maud, the Tawny Frogmouth; Zoe loved feeding all the birds!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-13 13.54.16BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-13 14.56.17BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-13 14.18.27Hiking from Bittangabee Bay to Hegarty’s Bay, part of the Light to Light Walk from Boyds Tower to Green Cape Lighthouse in the Ben Boyd National Park;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-17 16.17.16BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-17 14.07.28BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-17 13.56.53BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-17 13.57.50BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-17 12.57.17BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-17 17.23.34Discovering Penders, the property owned by businessman Ken Myers and architect Sir Roy Grounds, which was donated to National Parks in 1976 and is now part of Mimosa Rocks National Park, with its amazing views from the Bum Seat, photographed below, of Bithry Inley and the sea;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 16.13.13 BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 13.18.48and fascinating history and built environment, including Roy Ground’s tepeelike outdoor eating area, The Barn, and his geodesic dome structure;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 13.34.56BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 13.22.50BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 17.12.51BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 13.17.45 the magnificent Spotted Gum and Macrozamia forests and old orchard, with huge old camellia trees in full bloom;BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 15.30.23BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 15.47.10 as well as the beautiful coastal walk to Middle Beach, with golden banksias against the blue blue sea and our first ‘echidna train’.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 14.44.25BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 14.55.32BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 13.43.08 Apparently, during the mating season in July and August, one female will be followed by two to ten males, until she tires and the first in line gets lucky! According to the ranger on the track, echidnas are also very active just before rain and sure enough, three days later, it did rain! This quiet Swamp Wallaby kept us company over our picnic lunch.BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 14.20.04BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-07-25 16.30.37Other Winter highlights included my birthday (What a cake!!! Thank you, Chris!);BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-30 19.28.44BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-05-30 19.29.08 and a visit to Canberra for an interesting woodcut exhibition at the National Library of Australia, ‘Melodrama in Meiji Japan’ (see: https://www.nla.gov.au/meiji). We also popped into our favourite nursery, where we bought some tuberoses to plant in September after the frost. I just adore their scent, but will have to plant them away from the frost!BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-12 13.52.04We finished the Winter with a local orchid show at Merimbula with some stunning plants and an incredible range of form and colour.BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-19 12.45.09BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-19 12.38.53BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-19 12.40.40BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-19 12.42.42BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-19 12.41.33BlogWinterGardenReszd2517-08-19 12.40.26Next week, I am returning to one of my favourite rose types, the Noisettes. I will leave you with a Winter miracle, the humble spider’s web!BlogWinterGardenReszd2017-06-06 13.49.57

Sunflowers: December Feature Plant

What better way to celebrate the start of Summer than with a feature post on the wonderful exuberant Sunflower, Helianthus annuus!BlogSummerDays20%ReszdIMG_3870 Sunflowers belong to the daisy family, Asteraceae, and the genus Helianthus has over 70 species, most of them native to North America, except for three species from South America. Most are ornamental, frost-hardy herbaceous perennials, like the Jerusalem Artichoke, Helianthus tuberosus, but the Common Sunflower, familiar to most people, is an annual, as indicated by its species name: ‘annuus’. The genus name Helianthus is derived from two Greek words: ‘helios’ meaning ‘sun’ and ‘anthos’ meaning ‘flower’.BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2015-12-31 15.26.43Mythology

In Greece, the sunflower is a symbol of the water nymph Clytie, who was turned into a sunflower after she lost her love Apollo, and constantly faces the sun, awaiting the return of his chariot. The visual similarity of the flower to the sun makes it a symbol of worship and faithfulness in many religions. In fact, the Incas used South American sunflowers to worship the sun in their temples, where priestesses wore necklaces of sunflowers, cast in gold, as well as sunflower crowns. The Hopi Indians of North America also used sunflowers in their tribal rituals, as well as for food and a purple dye. In China, the sunflower is an auspicious symbol, denoting long life and good luck, its bright yellow colour symbolising vitality, intelligence and happiness. Vincent Van Gogh is famous for his series of paintings, depicting sunflowers in vases, one of which sold for $39 Million in 1987. Here is my daughter’s sunflower painting- just as special and always makes me feel happy.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5641Habitat and Distribution

Native to North America, the sunflower was first domesticated in South-Western USA over 5000 years ago and soon became widespread throughout the Americas. Spanish conquistador, Francisco Pizzaro, saw large crops in 16th century Peru and the sunflower was carried back to Spain, where it was cultivated and hybridized. By the 19th century, it was being cultivated on a wide scale in Russia, the Ukraine and the Caucasus regions for the manufacture of vegetable oil. The sunflower  is the State flower of Kansas and the National flower of Russia. Mostly grown in temperate areas, it is now also grown as a commercial crop in the United States, Argentina, India, China, Turkey, the European Union (mainly France and Spain) and South Africa. In Queensland, it is widely grown in the Central Highlands and on the Darling Downs, as seen in the photo below.blogsunflowers50reszdimage-158Description

Helianthus annuus is an annual forb, which grows up to 5 metres tall, with a well-developed tap root, which extends up to 3 metres into the soil. There are now a number of cultivars, varying in colour (yellow, orange, rust red) and height, from dwarf varieties less than 1 metre tall to taller cultivars over 3.5 metres tall.blogsunflowers50reszdimage-159 The tallest sunflower ever recorded was 7.76 metres tall, though there is a German record of 8.23 metres tall! There is also a discrepancy in growth rates: one source states 30 centimetres in one day, while another estimate is 2 metres in 6 months- that’s 182 days. For mathematicians, that’s 2000 centimetres in 182 days or 11 centimetres a day! Suffice to say that they are one of the fastest growing plants in the world! Our Burgundy Spray sunflower reached 2 metres last year and was harvested and ploughed in at 20 weeks- that’s 5 months- but we did use plenty of manure!BlogButterflyHeaven 20%Reszd2015-12-01 17.20.36 BlogSummerDays20%Reszd2015-12-27 12.02.02The erect stem is rough and hairy and is branched in many wild varieties, but unbranched in cultivated varieties.BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 10.11.21 The petiolate leaves are dentate (toothed margins) and sticky. The lower leaves are opposite and ovate or heart-shaped, while the leaves higher up the stem are arranged spirally.

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Blooming in Summer, the inflorescence is a terminal head (capitulum), 10 to 50 centimetres in diameter, with a world record of 87.63 centimetres.BlogFestiveSeason20%Reszd2015-12-23 20.05.37 Each flower head is surrounded by three rows of bracts (phyllaries)- see photo above- and is composed of sterile outer yellow (or orange/ rust red) ray florets, which attract pollinators, and fertile inner brownish disc florets.blogsunflowers50reszdimage-160 A single flower head may have up to two thousand disc florets, each with the potential to develop into a seed. If there are multiple flower heads on the same plant, the number of disc florets per head will be much lower.BlogSummerDays20%Reszd2015-12-28 09.50.43 The disc florets open in sequence, beginning at the periphery of the disc and moving inward. The disc florets are arranged in spiral whorls from the centre of the flowerhead, according to the famous Fibonacci sequence, which allows for the uniform packing of the maximum number of seeds on a seed head without any central overcrowding or bare patches at the outside edges. The Fibonacci sequence is a number set, in which each number is the sum of the previous two numbers: ie 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610 and so on, and was described by Fibonacci (also known as Leonardo of Pisa) in his book : Liber Abaci in 1202.image-159-copy-copy

In the case of sunflowers, count the clockwise and counterclockwise spirals that reach the outer edge, and you’ll usually find a pair of numbers from the sequence: 34 and 55, or 55 and 89, or—with very large sunflowers—89 and 144. Another interesting mathematical fact is that each floret is oriented to the next by the Golden Angle, 137.5 degrees.BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-03 19.38.59 Botanists have not yet been able to determine a mechanistic model that fully explains how the sunflower seed patterns arise, as some  plants don’t always show perfect Fibonacci numbers. A study published by the Royal Society Open Science on 18 May 2016 of 657 sunflower photos revealed one in five flowers had either a non-Fibonacci spiralling pattern or more complicated patterns, including near-Fibonacci sequences and other mathematical patterns that compete and clash across the flower head. See: http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/5/160091 . Another interesting link is: https://plus.maths.org/content/sunflowers. Click on the first article in the search results: ‘Citizen scientists count sunflower spirals’ by Marianne Freiberger.

For more information about sunflowers and the Fibonnaci sequence, see :

http://momath.org/home/fibonacci-numbers-of-sunflower-seed-spirals/

and    https://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/nature-golden-ratio-fibonacci.html.BlogJanGarden20%Reszd2016-01-05 16.04.53Another fascinating fact about sunflowers is their heliotropism (sun tracking) when young. During growth, sunflower leaves and flowers tilt to face the sun during the day, accounting for their French and Portuguese names: Tournesol (French) and Girassol (Portuguese). As the buds open, the flexible part of the stem tissue (the pulvinus) hardens and heliotropism ceases, the sunflower blooms permanently facing east, thereby acting as a living compass!BlogSummerDays20%Reszd2015-12-27 17.41.12 Sunflowers are pollinated by bees, though some modern varieties are fully self-fertile. The following website has some interesting information about sunflower pollination, which highlights the importance of bees. See: http://www.pollinator.ca/bestpractices/sunflowers.html. Initially, each floret is male, the pollen-bearing anthers extending above the rim of the floret, then later on, the style emerges and the stigmatic lobes spread, opening the receptive surfaces for pollination – see the photo below. If there is enough pollinator activity, the pollen is removed from each floret before the stigma opens, reducing the chances for self-pollination. The resultant seeds are 15 to 25 mm long and vary in colour from white to brown and black and even striped.BlogFeb Garden20%Reszd2016-02-12 10.24.58Growing Conditions and Propagation

Heat and drought-tolerant, sunflowers are very easy to grow in most climates, so long as they have full sun all day  (6 to 8 hours) and well-dug, nutrient-rich, well-drained soil. They are propagated by seed. Dig the seed bed well with plenty of manure/ compost, as they are heavy feeders, then rake the soil level. Broadcast the seed and rake into the surface or plant seeds individually to a depth of 2 cm. In cool temperate climates, sow seed in Spring after the last frost (we sowed our Burgundy Spray sunflower seeds on 7 October last year); in warm temperate climates, from late Winter to late Spring; and in frost-free subtropical and tropical regions, seed can be sown all year round, though Autumn to Spring is best. Sunflowers prefer long, hot Summers and hot wet humid Summers increase the risk of fungal diseases like downy or powdery mildew or rust. Mulch the seedbed with chopped sugar cane or lucerne to retain moisture, keep the soil cool and deter pigeons or mice. As the seedlings develop, thin them according to the size of the plants. Giant Russian sunflowers grow to over 4m high with a flowerhead of 5o cm, so require 1.5 m between each plant.BlogJanGarden20%ReszdIMG_5166 Water or foliar feed weekly with seaweed extract in the morning, so that the foliage is dry by sunset, also reducing the risk of fungal mould and rot. For show flowers and maximum seed production, apply two handfuls of poultry manure per square metre when the seedlings are 15 cm high and a 4 cm layer of well-rotted cow manure and compost when they reach 0.5 m in height. Stake the stems when necessary- old pantihose are good. The dwarf varieties should flower within 10 to 12 weeks of sowing, while the taller varieties take 12 to 16 weeks to bloom. Our Burgundy Spray sunflower had its first bloom open at 12 weeks, just in time to celebrate the New Year! We harvested the seeds on the 23 February 2016.BlogFestiveSeason20%Reszd2015-12-25 11.10.42

If your plants are affected by fungal disease, a general fungicide can be applied. Slugs and snails love browsing on the stems and leaves of sunflowers, so spray the seedlings with an organic snail bait or a mixture of 1 part espresso coffee to 3 parts of water, then mulch, repeating after heavy rain or irrigation. Bees and butterflies love the flowers, while birds, rodents, squirrels and deer are attracted to the sunflower seed, though large amounts are fatal to the latter! There are numerous insect pests, most of which attack other plants as well. More information on these insects and their management can be found on :http://ipmguidelinesforgrains.com.au/wp-content/uploads/Sunflower_IPM-Workshops_north-March2013.pdf and https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/plantsci/pests/e1457.pdf BlogFeb Garden20%ReszdIMG_0005 (2) Seed heads should be harvested when very dry ie once the back of the flower heads are turning yellow or brown. Tie paper bags over their heads, then cut the stems and hang upside-down in a dry, well-ventilated place till fully dry.BlogFeb Garden20%Reszd2016-02-12 10.21.10 The seed head can be sharply struck or rubbed across an old washboard to release the seeds. To process sunflower seed for consumption, soak them overnight in a bucket of 1 gallon (4.5 litres) water and 1 cup salt. Redry in a 250 degree Fahrenheit (120 degrees Celsius) oven for 4 to 5 hours and store in airtight containers.For replanting,  the seeds are viable for 5 years, according to: http://tcpermaculture.com/site/2013/06/14/how-long-will-seeds-last-stay-viable/, but if you want to check their viability before planting, see: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/check-sunflower-seeds-viable-68389.html.

Uses

Sunflowers are grown extensively throughout the world for human and animal food and sunflower oil production. There are two types grown. The first is oilseed, a very small black seed  with a very high  oil content , which  is processed into sunflower oil and meal and is also the seed of choice of most bird feeders. The second type is non-oilseed (confectionery sunflower), a larger black and white striped seed used in a variety of food products from snacks to bread. Sunflower seeds are rich in healthy fats, oil, vitamin E, protein, fibre and minerals and can be eaten raw or roasted for a savory snack or ground into a seed paste (Sun Butter) like peanut butter. They are excellent for promoting heart health and lowering cholesterol. The seeds can also be ground into a sunflower meal and used as a substitute for wheat flour in breads and cakes and the seed husks can be ground into a coffee-like beverage.blogsunflowers20reszdimg_0176 Sunflowers are also widely used as an animal food, mainly for birds (seeds) and cattle (forage crop or a high protein meal, which is a by-product of sunflower oil extraction and is often blended with soya bean meal). The seeds can also be pressed to make an  oil, which has been used in salads and for cooking, margarine production and in industry : as drying oils for paints and varnishes and in beauty products like soap and cosmetics. However, readers should be aware that there is some research about health risks associated with cooking with vegetable oils. See these links for further information: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11981884/Cooking-with-vegetable-oils-releases-toxic-cancer-causing-chemicals-say-experts.html and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20886885. The cooking oil is recycled as a biofuel. For more on the commercial industry overview of sunflowers in the United States, see: http://www.sunflowernsa.com  and   http://www.soyatech.com/sunflower_facts.htm. Sunflower oil can also be used in medicine: for constipation and lowering bad LDL cholesterol or applied directly to the skin for poorly healing wounds, skin injuries, psoriasis and arthritis and as a massage oil.blogsunflowers20reszdimg_0171Native Americans also grew sunflowers for food and oil, medicine, fibre and dyes , as well as to provide shelter for crops of maize, pumpkins and beans. The juice from the stems was used to treat wounds and an infusion of the plant in water was used to treat kidney and chest pain. The fibre from the stalks could be made into cloth and both the seeds and flower heads yielded a dye: purple, blue and black from the seeds and a bright yellow from the flowers.image-159-copySunflowers can also be grown as a green manure crop, the plants being dug into the ground once the seedlings reach a height of 30 cm. The plants can bioaccumulate heavy metals in contaminated soil, like lead, arsenic and uranium, and were used to remove nuclear fallout after the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters.image-160-copy-copyAnd finally, sunflowers are commonly used in floristry and are often given on the third wedding anniversary as a sign of adoration, strength and loyalty. Stems should be cut early in the morning before the flowerbuds are fully open- preferably ½ to ¾ open. If buying them, the leaves should be a strong green colour and the stems should be strong. They must be sold with a water source, as they shock easily. Remove any foliage below water level and cut the stems on a sharp diagonal (2 to 4 cm from the stem ends), under water if possible to avoid air blockages in the stems. Do NOT bash the stems. Use a preservative to maintain open flowers and change the vase water daily. The flowers have a vase life of 7 to 10 days. The leaves will wilt and die before the flowers, so only retain the upper leaves. To help prevent leaf drooping, add 10 drops of household detergent to 5 litres of water and leave in this solution for 1 to 3  hours, but no longer than overnight. If the leaves do start to droop, immediately recut the stems up to 6 cm and place in deep water with preservative for up to 3 hours. If the flowers droop completely, recut the stems and place them in boiling water to clear the blockage quickly (though the lifespan of the flower will be halved).

I really enjoyed researching my last feature post for this year. The sunflower is a fascinating plant and I hope you enjoyed the post as much as I enjoyed writing it.  If I have whetted your appetite to know more, it would be worth trying to source ‘Sunflowers: the Secret History’ by Joe Pappalardo. See: http://www.overlookpress.com/sunflowers-the-secret-history.html.

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The May Garden

With Autumn colds, exploratory trips of the local area and the demands of general day-to-day life, we have not spent as much time as we would have liked in the garden this month, but the weather has been superb! Hence, the recent excursions to the national parks of the hinterland and the escarpment, before it gets too cold or too snowy!!! We’ve visited Tuross Falls and the Cascades (Wadbilliga National Park); Deua National Park, both covered in last week’s post, and this last weekend, Lake Crackenback Resort, between  Jindabyne and Thredbo.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-12 12.27.36BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-02 16.50.50Ross has however managed to upkeep the vegetable garden from liming the soil to planting out new vegetable seedlings (sugarloaf cabbage, cauliflower, Winter greens and onions) and sowing spinach and snow pea seed.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-22 14.26.07BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-23 13.28.54BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-23 13.22.44BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.56.46BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0597 The capsicum are still productive, but the tomatoes are taking much longer to ripen. We harvested them all today to make Green Tomato Chutney!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-22 19.22.03BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-22 13.36.01BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-22 13.36.30He has also totally finished the pergola, with all the wiring done as well, so we should be able to train the climbers correctly for next season.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.21.46BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0587BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.18.48BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.19.07 We were rewarded with some late blooms of the climbing tea rose Adam.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.42.31Other roses still throwing out blooms include: Alister Stella Gray; Jude the Obscure and Evelyn; Heritage, Eglantyne and Alnwick; Mrs Herbert Stevens and Lamarque; Icegirl and The Children’s Rose; and Mutabilis and Monsieur Tillier.BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0596BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.02.40BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0590BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.41.56BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.58.16BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0592BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0577BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0578BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0594BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0595BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-02 17.06.03BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.10.37As you can see from the pergola photos, the Autumn foliage of the Snowball Tree (Viburnum opulus) has been superb from muted golds (south) to fiery reds (north).  BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-12 12.11.02BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.19.22BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.37.59 The Carolina Allspice beneath the snowball tree is also turning, its golden green leaves contrasting well with the red of the latter.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.37.49BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.16.14At the bottom of the garden, where the poplar and plums are bare, the pomegranate provides a welcome splash of gold.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.33.20 A softer gold carpet is forming under the Floribunda Crab Apple Tree.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.13.10 The maples too vary from an green-orange-red combination to more red-purple-orange hues, depending on the variety.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 12.21.21BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 12.56.02BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 12.01.38BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 16.59.07BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 16.59.02 In fact, the whole backdrop to the garden is in its most interesting and colourful phase.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 15.34.41BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 11.55.52The Paris daisies are in full gold regalia in the Moon Bed and attract many butterflies.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.36.58 The dahlias are the other major highlight in the May Garden.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-23 13.21.56 The tree dahlias are finally in bloom, their fragile, soft mauve-pink flowers and buds superbly contrasted against the intense blue Autumn skies.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.56.04BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.56.45BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 12.00.35BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.54.33BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.56.37BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-11 16.40.03 This is why I still grow them, despite their instant capitulation to wind and frost!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.53.27BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 18.43.05BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 12.01.27The seed dahlias have provided us with such joy and are unfortunately slowly finishing off for the season.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 12.56.15BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_1402BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.03.34 Knowing that their days are limited, their foliage already touched up by a few early light frosts, I have started cutting them with longer stems for beautiful floral arrangements for the house.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.44.04BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.35.40 It is such a shame that they don’t flower over Winter, as they really cheer the place up with their wonderful colours.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.31.59BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.33.19BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.32.23BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.32.46BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.47.18BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.47.23BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.46.38BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.46.49BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-01 12.10.49BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-01 12.11.12 While I love the flamboyance of the deep reds, deep gold and bright oranges and pinks, I equally love the softer warm orange-pink shades.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.34.29BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.36.46BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 12.21.41BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.36.08 I suspect this is the last dahlia bouquet for the season!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 19.26.55BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.28.47BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.28.56Here is the last zinnia bouquet, picked in early May as we cleaned up the cutting garden, as well as a sweet little posy of violets, the first of the season.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-01 12.08.45BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-03 10.37.59We attacked the chaos of the late Autumn cutting garden with a vengeance, pruning back the rampant wayward stems of the ‘Meadow Lea’ dahlia, removing spent plants and transplanting the Angelica and Lady’s Mantle to more appropriate (ie larger) sites of the garden. We transplanted the foxgloves to the back of the cutting garden and left the old biennial stock, the new cornflowers and a very brave, tenacious but foolish Iceland poppy seedling !BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-02 16.55.28BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-02 16.55.55BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.58.43 I have sowed seed of Ladybird Poppies, Linum and more Stock in egg cartons, for less disruptive transplantation in the cutting garden later on.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.48.25  All the old bulbs are surfacing, except for the De Caen anemones, whose corms have disintegrated to nothing! Possibly, the ground was too wet during their dormant period or maybe the greedy zinnias took all their nourishment! We planted out Species Tulips (Tulipa clusiana ‘Cynthia’), as well as 3 ‘Bokassa Gold’ Tulips, down the centre of their empty bed on Mothers’ Day.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.37.17 We also moved 2 camellias (‘Little Red Riding Hood’ and ‘Nuccio’s Gem’) forward, so they get more light, while still being shaded, and removed the dying Maple on the north-west corner of the cutting garden, which will be a great improvement , as it will decrease the amount of Winter shade on the bed.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.40.45 Earlier this month, we also planted the bulbs of Snake’s Head Fritillary, a Delft Blue Hyacinth and miniature Tête à Tête daffodils in the rockery garden, as well as 25 Grape Hyacinth, which are already up. I also planted some pinks: Valda Wyatt, Dianthus Pretty and Coconut Sundae into this bed . The Rockery Garden is a good spot for all my smaller treasures! We moved the Rozanne Geranium into the end of the bed, and while it will die back with the frosts, it should come again in Spring.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 15.34.49BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.31.54BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0579Across the way, the heliotrope continues to colour the foot of the climbing rose Mrs. Herbert Stevens.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 18.37.45 The violets are coming into their own, as are the forget-me-knots in the Soho Bed.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.30.20BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 17.30.34BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.18.56BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.58.09At the back of the house, the white Nerine show is coming to a close, but the Nandina is now taking centre stage with its red Autumn foliage and berries and the occasional cream flower spike.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 18.44.29BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 18.44.38BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0826BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.59.38BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.54.37 The Bowerbirds are  loving the black ivy berries.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.55.16 The Loquat trees are in full bloom this year, so we should get plenty of fruit (and probably accompanying flying foxes!).BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-15 10.28.02BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 17.17.13 BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.07.14The King Parrots and Crimson Rosellas are back to harvest the Duranta berries, as well as nibble the fresh shoots of the Giant Bamboo.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 10.08.59BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 10.11.01BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-08 10.09.20BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_1180  The bird bath is still a popular venue with female Bowerbirds, Crimson Rosellas and Currawongs all vying for a place!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 14.16.29BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 14.18.38BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 14.21.30 And the first of the camellia blooms are out- a soft pink and a few deep rose pink flowers, complementing the warm pink cyclamen at the front door.BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 11.56.10BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-13 11.58.44BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-24 15.34.24The Grevillea has grown so much and is in full bloom and the protea is flowering again.BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0584 BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-22 18.20.34We have started protecting our second Firewheel Tree and Silky Oak from the frost with hessian covers.BlogMayGarden20%ReszdIMG_0585The cumquats are covered in little orange globes – I can’t wait to make a new batch of Cumquat Marmalade!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-06 12.44.14 BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-21 17.17.00This little thrush is doing a stirling job keeping the bugs under control! Not a sign of the bronze orange stink bugs, though Leaf Miner has been distorting the leaves on the new citrus plants, so Ross has administered an application of Eco-Oil to treat them. See : http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s2528879.htm BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-12 12.13.50BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-12 12.13.56Maybe, we should send this little praying mantis down to the citrus!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-05-09 13.23.07 I can’t wait for all the citrus to reach fruit-bearing age, though our Lemonade already has 3 fruits on it! I feel another batch of Lime Cordial is also calling!!!BlogMayGarden20%Reszd2016-04-29 12.09.30And my first ever Peony Rose (Dr. Alexander Fleming) and Lily-of-the-Valley bulbs have just arrived from Tesselaars, so I am back into the garden! Till next week…!

 

Favourite Gardens Regularly Open To the Public : Nursery Gardens in Victoria

Now to some famous old nurseries in Victoria, which are open all year round and sell a wide variety of plants. Next month, I will feature the smaller, more specialized nurseries. I am starting with a very famous name in the nursery world in Australia, that of Clive Blazely and The Diggers’ Club and their two properties : ‘Heronswood’ and ‘The Garden of St. Erth’, followed by ‘Cloudehill’, which opened a Diggers’ shop in 2014 and two of our current suppliers : Tesselaars and Lambley Nursery.

The Diggers’ Club

https://www.diggers.com.au

The Diggers’ Club was formed back in 1978, when Clive and Penny Blazely saw a need to preserve and promote heirloom vegetable and flower varieties, which were being dropped from the mainstream seed companies. The name : ‘Diggers’ refers to the 17th Century English diggers who grew food on public land to donate to the poor, as well as the goldrush diggers who rebelled at Eureka Stockade and of course, the Australian soldiers in World War I. Their first mail order catalogue listed 300 varieties of vegetable and flower seeds.BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9315In 1983, Clive and Penny bought ‘Heronswood’ on the Mornington Peninsula and developed a 2 hectare cottage garden based on heirloom varieties. They pioneered the use of drought-tolerant plants in 1988 and led the revival of heirloom vegetables in 1991. Slowly, the business grew. In 1996, they opened a thatched roof cafe ‘Fork to Fork’, as well as buying a 2nd Diggers property, The Garden of St. Erth. Unfortunately, the cafe burnt down in 2014, but ‘Heronswood’ now has its restaurant in the historic house itself.BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9308In 2007, the nursery, seed departments and office moved to a 20 acre site in Dromana and in 2011, Clive and Penny gifted ownership of the entire operation : Diggers’ Club, Heronswood and The Garden of St. Erth to the Diggers Garden and Environmental Trust, to ensure that all their work over the last 30 years would be continued forever. The trust is involved with research, education and the preservation and conservation of botanical and ecological habitats, historic houses and gardens and heirloom seeds, as well as the promotion of the use of horticulture for dietary wellbeing and health. In amongst all this, Clive has also written 7 books on flower, vegetable and fruit gardening!

In 2011, they also opened their 3rd Diggers shop in Adelaide Botanic Garden, their 4th shop  at Cloudehill in April 2014 and their 5th shop at Heritage Nursery, Yarralumla, Canberra, in November 2015. We are particularly happy about this latest development, as Heritage Nursery (http://heritagenursery.com.au/) is one of our favourite nurseries in Canberra and we will now seriously consider rejoining Diggers’ membership, not just for their wonderful heirloom seed range, including their Sun and Moon watermelon seeds, but also the fact that as Diggers members, we get a 10 percent reduction on the price of any future plant purchases from Heritage Nursery!

Diggers’ Club is now the largest garden club in Australia with the biggest range in heirloom seeds and plants. Membership costs $49 per year, with the cost reducing if you sign up for longer. Membership benefits include :

  • 7 Seasonal magazines with lots of gardening advice, including a bumper seed annual for vegetables, flowers and herbs.
  • Discounted prices on shop products, including collections of plants, seeds and bulbs and books.
  • Member-exclusive products of rare and extra special plants, seeds and bulbs.
  • Free entry to the Heronswood, The Garden of St. Erth and Cloudehill.
  • Free gardening advice from Diggers’ experts.
  • Free seed offers in Autumn and late Spring, as well as 2 year memberships.

Their current emphasis is on preserving the best plants and gardening traditions for Australian conditions. They are strong vocal advocates against climate change and genetically-modified seeds and food, as well as speaking out against industrial agriculture and the corporatization of our food supply. They are also heavily involved in education from tours of their gardens to seasonal festivals, monthly workshops and special events led by gardening experts. Their wealth of garden expertise listed in https://www.diggers.com.au/about-us/experts/  reads like a ‘Who’s Who’ of the gardening world in Australia and I recognized a number of names : Andrew Laidlaw from Burley, Tino Carnevale from ABC TV’s Gardening Australia, Indira Naidoo (Ex-SBS news reader and author of ‘The Edible City’), Penny Woodward, writer of herbal books and Robyn Francis of permaculture fame, to name but a few.

Diggers’ website is a mine of gardening information. Their ‘What’s On’ tab includes :

  • What’s In Season
  • Garden festivals and gardens to visit
  • Garden Travel
  • Workshop Events and Master Classes
  • Little Diggers for Junior Green Thumbs and even
  • Recipes from the Diggers chefs.

There is also a Plant Finder, which helps you to compile a list of plants, which will grow well in your climatic zone, based on postcode, and which can be narrowed down according to variables like plant height and colour, position and water and flowering, fruiting and sowing times. They also have a number of gardening fact sheets and video tutorials on: Composting; Sowing seeds and planting strawberry runners or garlic; Summer pruning; Growing beans and Espaliering fruit trees. These are all freely available, whether you are members or not. A visit to both their gardens is well worthwhile.

Heronswood Gardens, Nursery and Restaurant

105 Latrobe Parade Dromana Victoria 3936

Open 7 days 9am-5pm. Closed 24-26 December and Good Friday

$10 visitors; Free for Diggers’ members and children under 16 years old;                   Shop: free entry

https://www.diggers.com.au/our-gardens/heronswood/

Home of the Diggers’ Club and classified by the National Trust of Australia, as well as being on the Australian Heritage Places Register and the Victorian Heritage Register, Heronswood Garden is one of only 4 gardens in Victoria to be listed in the ‘The Oxford Companion to Gardens‘, edited by Patrick Taylor (http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780198662556.001.0001/acref-9780198662556), a garden design encyclopaedia listing gardens from all over the world from the earliest times to the present day. The other three are Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne (see my post : https://candeloblooms.com/2015/10/08/favourite-early-19th-century-botanic-gardens-in-australia/), Mawallock (http://www.williewildlifesculptures.com.au/general/mawallok-open-garden/ and http://www.homelife.com.au/gardening/gardening-tips/grand-designs-article) and Rippon Lea (see last month’s post : https://candeloblooms.com/2016/02/09/favourite-gardens-regularly-open-to-the-public-historic-homes-and-gardens/)BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9310The steep-roofed two-storey house was built in 1866 from granite, dressed with limestone. It was the family home of Melbourne University’s 1st Professor of Law, William Hearn (1826-1888), He employed William Moat to develop the spacious lawns, gardens and orchard. He planted many oriental and occidental trees, including a Cape Chestnut, which still stands today. William Hearn  sold his property to another university professor and ex-student Alexander Sutherland, who then sold it to his friend and another ex-student of Hearn’s, H.B. Higgins (1851-1929), who rose to become a very influential politician and Federal Attorney General.

The house is now home to Heronswood Restaurant, whose meals are all based on fresh produce, local wines and organic vegetables from their gardens.BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9309Heronswood Garden was the first garden in Australia to be certified organic. There are 5 separate vegetable gardens with the best heirloom vegetables for Australian conditions. as well as extensive plantings of flowers in perennial borders, dry climate and cottage gardens and annual gardens. One of Diggers’ trademarks is the integration of vegetables and flowers with fruit trees and herbs. The garden showcases the best flowers and plants for Australian conditions. Different plants provide highlights throughout the year, culminating in a peak in Summer with the Summer perennials and heirloom vegetables.BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9320BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9305BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9303BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9316The garden shop sells a wide range of plants : cottage flowers; edible plants; flowering shrubs and cool-climate trees, as well as Diggers heirloom seeds. Current monthly workshops at ‘Heronswood’ include : ‘Summer Fruit Tree Pruning’; ‘Floral Arrangements’ and ‘Growing Your Own Garlic’.BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_9307

The Garden of St. Erth

189 Simmons Reef Rd. Blackwood Victoria 3458

Open 7 days a week, except 24-26 December; Good Friday and Code Red or Extreme Fire Warning Days. 9am-5pm  $10 for visitors; Free for Diggers’ members and children under 16 years old; No charge to visit the shop or restaurant.

https://www.diggers.com.au/our-gardens/st-erth/   and

https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/better-homes-gardens/tv-and-video/video/watch/17516874/gardening-st-erth-walkaround-ep-19-07-06-2013/#page1BlogFavNurseries30%ReszdIMG_4541Diggers’  2nd property (see their official brochure above) and one of our favourite spots to visit, especially in Spring! It is situated at the end of Simmons Reef Rd between Wombat State Forest and Lerderberg State Park, so has plenty of native bird life in the area. It also has a long and interesting history!

In 1854, Matthew Rogers, a Cornish stonemason, left Sydney for the goldfields of Mt. Blackwood, now the village of Blackwood and named after the plentiful Blackwood wattles in the area. Back then, Mt. Blackwood was a bustling town of 13, 000 people and was surrounded by the townships of Red Hill, Golden Point, Barry’s Reef and Simmons’ Reef. In the early 1860s, Matthew built a sandstone cottage, which he called after his birth place in Cornwall. He attached a wooden extension to the western side of the cottage, where he ran a post office and store, as well as the boot factory behind the cottage. As the gold ran out, all the surrounding wooden cottages were moved to Trentham, the sandstone cottage became empty and the bush moved back in, until the land was bought by a group of Melbourne business men called the Simmons Reef Shire Council.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 4 022The Garden of St. Erth was developed by Tommy Garnett, a former Geelong Grammar Headmaster and horticultural writer and plant enthusiast. He would have had to have been the latter, as back in the 1970s, the soil was very poor due to the heavy gold mining activities of the 1880s. Basically, it was mining rubble! Tommy persisted and established a 2 hectare (6 acres) garden with many rare and unusual plants. He sold to the Diggers’ Club in 1996.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 3 249The current gardens were designed around the sandstone cottage, which is the entrance to the garden and houses the Diggers’ shop. The colour of the perennial borders complements the golden colour of the sandstone. Heaps of compost were added to improve the soil and intensive French horticultural practices applied to get the maximum productivity out of the small plots of land. Julian Blackhirst is now the Head Gardener.BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdmarchapril 130BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdmarchapril 133It is a wonderful place to visit with lots of inspirational ideas. There are over 3000 plant varieties, grown in a variety of  garden areas, including :

  • Herbaceous borders of long flowering Summer Perennials and ornamental grasses.
  • Mature trees including a Monterey Pine from gold mining days. Autumn colour.
  • Bush Garden.
  • Dry Climate gardens with drought-tolerant plants like Achillea, Bergamot, Russian Sage and a variety of Flowering Salvias.
  • Kitchen Garden containing heirloom vegetables like Tuscan Kale and purple carrots, which are used in the garden cafe.
  • Food Forest, based on permaculture principles, under a canopy of walnuts, hazelnuts and olives. I love their idea of growing Rattlesnake beans up the stems of corn with cucumbers underneath!
  • Espaliered pears and apples of over 200 varieties next to the old 1930s orchard at the back of the garden.
  • Berry arbours grown with sage and rhubarb  and finally…
  • Daffodil paddock, a wonderful sight in Spring!

BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdmarchapril 129BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 4 015BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 4 010BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdmarchapril 125BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 3 280BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 4 003BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 3 275BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 3 269Again, the emphasis is on educating the public about sustainable gardening and what is possible in the Australian climate. Workshops include courses on growing garlic or herbs and pest-repellent plants; companion planting and crop rotation; and bee-keeping for beginners or urban dwellers. Like Heronswood, there are also garden tours during the week.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 4 026BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdgrampians 3 297

Cloudehill

89 Olinda-Monbulk Rd. Olinda Victoria 3788

Open 7 days a week except 24-26 Dec and Good Friday 9am-5pm

$10 for adults; Children and Diggers’ members free

http://www.cloudehill.com.au/

https://www.diggers.com.au/our-gardens/cloudehill/

Cloudehill is situated on the easterly slope of the Dandenongs at a height of 580m above sea level. It receives 1.25 m rainfall per year, falling in most months, though February to April are the driest months. There is little frost, but it does snow occasionally. The big advantage, compared to the last garden, is its soil, which is deep volcanic loam.

Cloudehill started as a working farm back in the 1890s. George Woolwich cleared the 10 acres of old growth Eucalyptus regnans in 1895 to grow cherry trees and raspberry canes. At the end of the First World War, his elder son Ted built a cottage with Art Deco features and started a nursery on the bottom half of the land. In the 1920s, George’s younger son Jim grew wholesale flowers and foliage for the Melbourne florist market on the upper half. The two brothers bought neighbouring blocks of land and at one stage  had 70 acres of land under cultivation. During the 1920s,  they also imported plants from all over the world: Beech trees for foliage from England; Kurume Azaleas from the USA and beautiful Maples (1928) from Japan.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 017Ted’s Rangeview Nursery and Jim’s flower farm were very popular between 1930 -1950, but both closed down in the late 1960s. The nursery was sold on as a building block and the nursery plantings converted to a garden by Keith Purves. It is now owned by Mary and Ches Mason and run as a Bed&Breakfast establishment called Woolwich Retreat and Rangeview Gardens.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 027In 1991, Jim died and in 1992, Cloudehill was bought by the current owner Jeremy Francis. He inherited the old 1920s Beech trees, rhododendron hedges, deciduous azaleas and meadows naturalized with bulbs from the 1930s, a good start for a garden. Inspired by the Renaissance gardens of Europe and the English Arts & Crafts gardens, Jeremy developed a wonderful garden and his gardening journey is documented in his book : ‘Cloudehill : A Year in the Garden’ with beautiful photography by Claire Takacs. It is also worth receiving his newsletter. The layout can be seen in the photograph of the official brochure above.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 001BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 012BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 051BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 050BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdlate june 028Cloudehill has 20 garden compartments, including :

  • Diggers Shop and Bambouserie with a collection of cool-climate bamboos
  • Restaurant Walk : the menu of Seasons Restaurant is dictated by the vegetable garden
  • Commedia dell’arte Lawn with South African bulbs flowering in Spring and Summer
  • Water Garden with hornbeam hedges, oak leaf hydrangeas and ornamental grasses
  • The Maple Court with the old maples imported from the Yokohama Trading Nursery, Japan, back in 1928
  • Warm Border – bright red, orange and gold mixed herbaceous plants flowering from November through to Early March
  • Cool Border-pastel flowers from Late Spring to Early Autumn
  • Summer House Garden including English Beech trees from 1928
  • Quadrangle Lawn with scuptures, topiary and Japanese Botan Tree Peonies
  • Marquee Lawn for weddings and receptions with a huge old ‘picking’rhododendron
  • Gallery Walk with art and sculptures, more tree peonies, mixed shrubs and Scotch Briar roses
  • The Peony Pavilion with hostas, Beech and American Lutea hybrid Tree Peonies
  • Shade Borders- American Tulip tree, conifers and yews and hydrangeas and camellias
  • Theatre Lawn, perfect for hosting Shakespearean plays performed by OzAct in the Summer Twilight evenings and backed by a mixed beech hedge of Green and Copper Beeches, planted in 1950s for foliage
  • Azalea Steps : Deciduous azaleas, Beech and Kalmia
  • Seasons Glade : Witch Hazels, maples and tree ferns surrounding a beautiful sculpture called ‘The Seasons’ by Leopoldine Mimovich (see 2 photos below)
  • Upper Meadow full of naturalized daffodils, bluebells, grape hyacinth in Spring and South African bulbs through the Summer
  • Beech Walk : Copper Beech planted for foliage production in the 1960s and underplanted with bluebells
  • Lower Meadow: more long- established bulbs and meadow grass, leading to the entrance to ‘Rangeview’ with a huge Magnolia denudata over the entrance. I love Madeline Meyer’s whimsical glazed terracotta figures (see photo below)
  • Kitchen Potager

BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 010BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 056BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 066BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 033BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 034BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 052BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 030BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 094BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 099We loved our visits to Cloudehill and managed to see it in all seasons. The bones of the garden are very visible in Winter, when cyclamen and hellebores dot the ground and rhododendrons and magnolias towards Spring. BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 014BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdlate june 023BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdlate june 063BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 045The Spring bulbs are spectacular, as are the tree peonies and lilacs in October and the peonies, rhododendrons and peonies in early November. Diggers’ Garden Festival is held in Spring.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 037BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 029BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 047 I love the Warm and Cool Borders in Summer- such colour and abundance!BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 012BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 023BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 051BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 049BlogFavNurseries50%Reszdjens visit jan 2010 075 And then, it’s Autumn with all the wonderful colour of Fall.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 043We never got to see the new Diggers’ shop, started in April 2014, but it offers all the same things as at its other stores : heirloom seeds; cottage flowers; edible plants; flowering shrubs and cool-climate trees; books; garden tours and more workshops in crop rotation and companion planting; permaculture; worm farming; composting; backyard chook keeping; pests and diseases; cider making; growing blueberries,  herbs, bulbs and Spring wildflowers; pruning and training berries; and growing hedges and topiary.

Tesselaars

357 Monbulk Rd. Silvan Victoria 3795

Office Monday-Friday 8.30am-5pm; Plant shop Monday-Friday 8am-4.30pm, weekend and public holidays 10am-4pm; Closed mid December to late January.

https://www.tesselaar.net.au

http://www.tesselaarflowers.com.au/

http://tulipfestival.com.au

https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/better-homes-gardens/tv-and-video/video/watch/25283981/graham-ross-tesselaar-tulips-ep-38-17-10-14/#page1

http://gardeningandplantsexpo.com.au/about.shtml

BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 237Tesselaars is not far from Cloudehill and is another very big player in the nursery and floristry industry in Australia. It was started by a young Dutch couple, Cees and Johanna Tesselaar, who left Holland on their wedding day to settle in Australia in June 1939, just before the outbreak of the Second World War. They first settled in Ferntree Gully and in 1945, they bought a 6 hectare farm at Silvan, which they called Padua Bulb Nurseries. Their first crops were tulips and gladioli.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 239The business grew into Australia’s largest family-owned floricultural operation and is now run by the eldest son Kees and involves 3 generations of the family. Indeed, many of the employees are also successive generations of their families, so there is a strong family tradition at Tesselaars. They also have specialist network subsidiaries and associated companies in Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia with 140 growers throughout Australia.BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 266BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 248Tesselaars not only grows and markets bulbs, but also plants, perennials and cut flowers. The bulbs are mostly field-grown and are distributed to other wholesalers, prepackaged in large amounts for major Australian distributors, as well as being sold by mail-order. They are the largest bulb and perennial mail order company in Australia and have a loyal customer base, including me! I have always bought by bulbs from Tesselaars ever since I had my first garden back in the early 1980s. They also provide excellent notes on growing bulbs, as well as other plants, with your order. There is also lots of information on their website (see their tab :  Gardening Resources).BlogFavNurseries20%Reszd2016-02-25 11.24.43BlogFavNurseries30%Reszdmelbourne spring 250